UNE 2015 Indigenous Education Statement

UNIVERSITY OF NEW ENGLAND UPDATE ON 2014 YEAR

Reporting on 2014 Outcomes and Future Plans

Indigenous Tertiary Programs, Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

Prepared By

Oorala Aboriginal Centre, UNE In Consultation with Schools and Directorates of The University of New England


Section 1: Achievement of National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Policy (AEP) Goals in 2014 and Plans for Future Years

Please provide evidence of:

  • strategies you have implemented which seek to achieve the AEP goals and your assessment of whether these strategies are working;
  • constraints on your ability to achieve the AEP goals; and
  • plans for future improvement of existing strategies or implementation of new strategies to meet each of the AEP goals relevant to higher education.
The AEP goals (paraphrased) relating to higher education are to:
  1. Establish effective arrangements for the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in educational decision-making.
  2. Increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples employed, as academic and non- academic staff in higher education institutions.
  3. Ensure equitable access of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to higher education.
  4. Achieve the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in higher education, at rates commensurate with those of all other Australians.
  5. Enable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to attain the same graduation rates from award courses in higher education as for other Australians.
  6. To provide all Australian students with an understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander traditional and contemporary cultures.
1. Establish effective arrangements for the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in educational decision-making.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people involved in institutional decision-making processes and the nature of their involvement at UNE

Encouraging and increasing Indigenous representation within governing and decision-making bodies, such as the UNE Council, Academic Board and other University Committees, as well as in management positions, is a core focus for UNE. Organisational commitment to this is expressed in the Compact and operationalised through the UNE Regional Aboriginal Higher Education Strategy. A key achievement during 2014 is the addition of two Aboriginal members to the UNE Council, an Aboriginal undergraduate student and a ministerial appointment.

UNE recognises that effective education requires a cohesive approach that draws in the wider staff and student bodies, University structures and the community in a way that ensures cultural safety and allows greater opportunity for educational goals to be achieved. This includes the bringing of diverse perspectives in such areas as decision-making, to reflect the needs and aspirations of UNE’s diverse communities.  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are involved in UNE decision-making in the following ways:   representation by the Director and staff of the Oorala Aboriginal Centre, and UNE staff and representatives from Aboriginal communities.  Their number and nature of their involvement in 2014 is detailed in the following:

  • UNE Council (2): The UNE Council has no explicit requirement for Indigenous representation, however membership now includes an Aboriginal student as the elected UNE Undergraduate Student Representative and an Aboriginal member as a ministerial appointee
  • Infrastructure Committee of the UNE Council (1): The ministerial appointee was elected as a member during 2014
  • Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) (4): HREC has 1 mandated position for an  Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander with a tertiary qualification and research experience and one mandated position for a Minister of Religion or person in the community with a similar role such as an Aboriginal Elder. In 2014 Aboriginal representatives included the Director of the Oorala Aboriginal Centre, an academic from the School of Humanities and the Vice-Chancellor’s Aboriginal Research Fellow,  with additional representation by an Aboriginal academic from the School of Health, (as an academic member with knowledge and current experience in professional care, counselling or treatment of people) [1]
  • Academic Board Teaching and Learning Committee (1): Oorala Director
  • School of Law Advisory Board (1): Oorala Director
  • School of Law Teaching & Learning Committee (1): Oorala Director
  • Social Work External Advisory Committee (1): Oorala Director
  • Vice-Chancellor’s Committee (1): Oorala Director
  • Vice-Chancellor’s Social Justice Committee (1): Oorala Director
  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy Governance Committee (2): Oorala Director and UNE Aboriginal Employment Officer
  • Enrolment Steering Committee (1): Oorala Student Services Manager
  • Student Administration & Services Forums (1): Oorala Student Services Manager
  • Occupational Health & Safety Committee (1): Oorala Administrative Assistant

In addition to the above, non-Indigenous Oorala staff represented the Centre as nominees to the following due to their professional roles:

  • Library Advisory Committee, Dixson Library (1): Lecturer
  • UNE Forums on Draft Disability Action Plan (1): Policy & Planning Officer
  • UNE HR User Group and UNE Finance User Group (1): Resource & Compliance Officer

The School of Health consults and reviews with its External Advisory Committees on the development of Nursing and Counselling curricula; the relevant Nursing Committee includes Indigenous representation from UNE and the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses (CATSIN).


 

Footnotes

[1] HREC membership complies with the NHMRC National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research.

If there is no Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander membership on key decision making bodies, please provide an explanation

In addition to the formal representation outlined above there are opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff to be members of other University committees, including the Academic Board. However as staff are not required to identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander the representation will not be identified as such.

The roles and responsibilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders at UNE

The roles and responsibilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders at UNE is to provide advice and input on matters related to UNE’s governance, strategies, policies and procedures as a higher educational institution.

  • The two Aboriginal appointments to the UNE Council during 2014 are among the 17 members of the UNE Council who are responsible for the governance of the University and are involved in the decision-making and overseeing of UNE’s operations for the benefit of its students, staff, academic community and the wider community as a whole.
  • The role of the Director of the Oorala Aboriginal Centre includes leadership at UNE through involvement in committees and high level liaison with Schools and Directorates on matters and issues that relate to academic support and outcomes in recruitment, access, participation, retention and completion for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in higher education, as well as providing strategic direction for the Centre’s role in the University’s community and student engagement, academic programs and cultural competency.
  • From 2014, Oorala’s Student Relationship Officer undertook the role of ‘Elder in Residence’ to represent Oorala and UNE. Local Aboriginal community leaders, including Oorala’s Elder in Residence, are invited by areas across UNE to provide consultation and participation in protocols for official events, programs and projects, including Welcome to Country and incorporation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives.
  • The Vice-Chancellor’s Aboriginal Research Fellow appointed in 2013, who is an Aboriginal academic seconded from Oorala, continued through 2014 to advise on a number of UNE research projects.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff from Oorala and across the University are involved extensively in engaging with community groups in the region, providing valuable expertise to the University, gained through their academic and professional experience and community engagement. These staff provided input on UNE employment and student support matters.
  • Aboriginal Employment Officer develops and maintains relationships with the community and represents UNE on government and community organisations and sits on the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy Governance Committee that oversees its implementation.
  • In 2014 the Indigenous Student Association was reactivated at UNE, with a goal to advance
    Indigenous student representation on student and UNE committees.
Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s role

The Director, Elder in Residence and other staff of Oorala, throughout 2014, maintained involvement in several groups engaging with the community and the higher education sector. The Director was also involved in consultation and decision-making at UNE through several University committees, boards and working parties, as listed above ['Roles and responsibilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders at UNE'].

In the broader higher education sector Oorala represented UNE on:

  • the National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Consortium (NATSIHEC) (2): Oorala Director and Oorala Elder in Residence
  • the National Indigenous Elders Think Tank (1): Oorala Elder in Residence

Across the local community Oorala’s participation by Aboriginal staff included:

  • Gayinyaga Aboriginal Advisory Committee (1)
  • Local Armidale lnteragency Committee (1)
  • East Armidale Community Garden Project (2)
  • Armidale Clontarf Academy Awards Night (2)
2. Increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff employed as academic and non-academic staff in higher education institutions.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

An outline of UNE’s active Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy including details on how it was authored, how current it is and whether or not it is publicly accessible on the internet (current link provided below)

UNE identifies attracting and retaining Indigenous staff as a major priority in its Mission-based Compact and this is echoed in the UNE Strategic Plan 2011-2015 which seeks to innovate in the recruitment and retention of regional, remote and ATSI students and staff, particularly within the New England region.

To operationalise this, the UNE Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy 2013 - 2018 was developed to provide a platform for increasing employment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples within UNE with a strong focus on recruitment, employment retention and career development for current and future staff of UNE. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy also guides the development of strategies that target appropriate workplace culture and practices, employment opportunities, career development plans and academic career paths, for both staff and students.

The strategy was authored by the Aboriginal Employment Officer in consultation with Human Resource Services, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, local community representatives, the Director of Oorala Aboriginal Centre and UNE senior staff. The strategy is on the UNE webpage, at a link accessible to UNE and the public via ‘Information for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community’.

The strategy identifies objectives and initiatives aimed at increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment across all UNE schools and directorates through:

  • Community Partnerships – strengthening relationships between the community and UNE.
  • Career Development – building meaningful career paths for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff.
  • Becoming a Good Employer – building understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and appropriate workforce management practices.
  • Attracting and Retaining – increasing employment options for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Its key objectives are:

  • Achieving ongoing representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at UNE.
  • Identifying and introducing specific strategies to support the attraction of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander professional and academic staff.
  • Establishing and promoting career development options for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees.
Strategies for increasing numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff employed at UNE. (Link to the current Employment Statement is already noted herein)

UNE’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy 2013-2018 is progressing well, with staff numbers ahead of projected targets. UNE is in a similar position to many universities across the country in that we are facing challenges in the recruitment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples into academic roles. In recognition of this the Strategy was refocused to concentrate on the attraction and retention of Aboriginal people into both Professional and Academic roles through “growing our own”. A successful example is the creation of an additional academic role (Pre-Doctoral Fellow in Law) in the UNE School of Law to be filled in June 2015.

Employment of suitable Indigenous candidates is seen as a necessity to increase Indigenous cultural safety within the University, and a number of schools and directorates sought to employ more Indigenous staff in various roles in 2014. Flexible approaches have been used to meet longer-term staffing requirements, especially where there is a limited pool of suitable candidates, e.g. for academic positions.

Several UNE schools have aimed to attract Indigenous people to academic positions and have committed to ‘grow our own’ through offering scholarships into Honours and HDR programs. UNE’s School of Arts, for example, sought to create an Indigenous fellowship in creative practices through a part-time professional doctorate or HDR with long-term potential for the candidate to supervise Indigenous study in an academic role. Another school offered an Aboriginal Honours Scholarship in 2014 with the intention of training candidates potentially suitable for employment at a later stage.

The directorate of Human Resource Services has undertaken a number of activities to facilitate more successful Indigenous employment by the University. This includes workshops for Aboriginal community members on UNE recruitment processes and application requirements. Internally, HRS has also created an Indigenous staff career development framework and is working towards using the ATSI work study program to provide an employment opportunity in an administrative role linked to the progression of a Human Resources qualification.

The number of Indigenous-specific positions at UNE (detailed by occupation and level).

Table 1a – Permanent positions

Faculty/Institute/SectionAcademic / Non-
Academic
Position title
Oorala Aboriginal CentreNon-Academic (Contract)Director
Oorala Aboriginal CentreNon-AcademicStudent Relationship Officer, HEO4
Oorala Aboriginal CentreNon-AcademicStudent Services Administrative Assistant, HEO4
Oorala Aboriginal CentreNon-AcademicAdministrative Assistant, HEO4
Oorala Aboriginal CentreNon-AcademicStudent Services Officer, HEO6
Oorala Aboriginal CentreNon-AcademicStudent Services Manager, HEO7
Oorala Aboriginal CentreNon-AcademicSpecial Projects Officer, HEO6
School of Humanities - HistoryAcademicLecturer, ATB
Research ServicesAcademicVC's Aboriginal Research Fellow, ATA
Human Resource ServicesNon-AcademicAboriginal Employment Officer, HEO7
 
Total10 

Table 1b – Fixed term positions

Faculty/Institute/SectionAcademic / Non-
Academic
Position title
Oorala Aboriginal CentreNon-AcademicStudent Service Officer – Retention, HEO6
Research ServicesNon-AcademicLight the Fire Project Coordinator, HEO7
School of Environmental & Rural
Science
Non-AcademicTechnical Assistant, HEO2
School of Environmental & Rural
Science
Non-AcademicTechnical Assistant, HEO3
School of Environmental & Rural
Science
Non-AcademicTechnical Assistant, HEO3
 
Total5 

Table 2 – Casual Positions

Faculty/Institute/SectionAcademic / Non-
Academic
Position title
   
TotalNil 

In 2014 UNE Life proposed plans for an ongoing Indigenous traineeship for Aboriginal people.

The current number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff at UNE and their roles across the University (including numbers in academic and non-academic roles, and by level)
Number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff and their roles across the University

Faculty/Institute/Section

Academic / Non-Academic

Position title

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic (Contract)

Director

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Student Services Manager, HEO7

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Student Services Officer, HEO6

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Student Relationship Officer, HEO4 *

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Student Services Admin. Assistant, HEO4

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Admin. Assistant, HEO4

School of Humanities - History

Academic

Lecturer, ATB

School of Health - Counselling

Academic

Lecturer in Counselling, ATB/Adjunct Associate Professor HVA

School of Health - Nursing

Academic

Lecturer, Mental Health Nursing, ATB

School of Science & Technology

Non-Academic

Admin. Assistant, HEO4

School of Environmental & Rural Science

Non-Academic

Project Officer – Soil & Plant Analysis, HEO5 *

School of Environmental & Rural Science

Non-Academic

Laboratory Assistant, HEO2

Research Services

Academic

Vice-Chancellor’s Aboriginal Research Fellow (ATA)

Research Services

Non-Academic

Light the Fire Project Coordinator, HEO7 *

IT – Client Services

Non-Academic

Client Services Officer, HEO5

Learning Futures, Learning Innovations Hub

Non-Academic

Despatch Coordinator, HEO5

Student Administration & Services

Non-Academic

Admin. Assistant, HEO4

Student Administration & Services

Non-Academic

Admin. Assistant, HEO4

Dixson Library Collections Services

Non-Academic

Library Assistant, HEO4

Yarm Gwanga Child Care Centre

Non-Academic

Trained Child Care Worker, HEO4

School of Environmental & Rural Science

Non-Academic

Technical Assistant, HEO2

Human Resource Services

Non-Academic

Aboriginal Employment Officer, HEO7

Facilities Management Services – Operations

Non-Academic

Plumber, HEO4

Mary White College

Non-Academic

Maintenance Officer, HEO3

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic (casual)

Correctional Centre Tutor, ATA

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic (casual)

Senior Project Officer, HEO7

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic (casual)

Special Projects Officer, HEO6

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic (casual)

Admin. Assistant, HEO4

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic (casual)

Student Casual, HEO Student Level 1

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic (casual)
&
Non-Academic (casual)

1 staff employed in multiple positions:
ITAS Tutor, Casual Academic (workshops)
and
Student Casual, HEO Student Level 1 *

Yarm Gwanga Child Care Centre

Non-Academic (casual)

Casual Child Care Worker, HEO2

   

Total

31

 

* Some staff were employed in other short-term casual positions at various levels across UNE during 2014 in addition to the roles listed in the above table.

The data for number of ATSI staff employed at UNE indicates an increase from the 2013 total of 24. The number of ATSI academic staff remained stable over the 2013-2014 period.

3. Ensure equitable access of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to higher education.

UNE identifies Indigenous access, participation and retention in higher education as a long-term strategic priority and is reflected in UNE’s Mission-based Compact 2014-2016. The provision of alternative entry pathways to UNE for ATSI students has proven to be a successful strategy to improve access, with the number of commencing ATSI students growing by 5% in 2014, compared to 2% over the same period in the non ATSI domestic population. Retention and completion remain the focus for ongoing improvement activity and UNE acknowledges that improving access to higher education for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates will require a sustained University-wide commitment to implement short, medium and long-term priorities as outlined in UNE’s Strategic Plan 2011-2015 and it subordinate Teaching and Learning Plan 2012-2015 and Research Plan 2012-2015, which include the following strategies.

  • Provide effective academic scaffolding and support services.
  • Innovate in the recruitment and retention of regional, remote and ATSI students and staff, particularly within the New England region.
  • Employ innovative recruitment and retention activities aimed at regional, remote and Indigenous students, particularly within the New England region.
  • Develop innovative partnerships focused on students from low SES areas and Indigenous students (e.g. alternative entry pathways, scholarships, strategic courses) that build capacity in these students and their communities.
  • Ensure our graduate attributes promote social and cultural understanding including an appreciation of Indigenous culture and history.
  • Establish alternative pathways and academic support programs that address Indigenous and low SES student participation in higher degree programs.

In addition, in 2013 UNE developed a Regional Aboriginal Higher Education Strategy (RAHES) which focuses on meeting two discrete but equally important strategic aims of the University:

  • innovate in the recruitment of regional, remote and ATSI students, particularly within the New England region, and
  • support collaboration between education providers to ensure a coordinated approach to engaging with Aboriginal communities to assist in building educational aspiration, relevant pathways to higher education and rates of retention and completion of higher education by Aboriginal students.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

Commencing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (all student comparison access rate, 2013-2014)
Student Group

2013

2014

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

284

299

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (Domestic students only):

8,960

9,114

Of the total commencing ATSI students enrolled at UNE (including enabling programs), on campus enrolments grew from 67 in 2013 to 78 in 2014; off campus enrolments grew from 217 in 2013 to
221 in 2014.

Programs run by UNE to improve access by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

The provision of alternative entry pathways is a significant component of UNE’s current and successful approach to ensuring Indigenous student access, which includes a flexible approach to entry requirements through Oorala’s ISP and TRACKS Programs or UNE’s enabling courses. UNE’s sub-degree undergraduate programs also play a valuable role, as qualifications requiring shorter duration of study, which also offer pathways into further study at the Bachelors level. This approach has resulted in consistently excellent outcomes, with UNE meeting enrolment targets in successive years. However, UNE has identified potential for expansion of Diploma level programs to include more content with Indigenous knowledge and perspectives.

The following table outlines the programs run by UNE to improve access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

UNE programs to improve access for ATSI students

Program Name

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

TRACKS Tertiary Preparation Program

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants (18 years and over)

Ongoing alternative entry program offered on campus and online through Oorala; Tertiary preparation assists Indigenous students to develop their study skills and their transition to mainstream UNE courses (TRACKS includes five core TRAX units and one undergraduate unit).

Enrolments have remained steady (see data under ‘Oorala’s Role – Access Programs’)

Internal Selection Program

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants (18 years and over)

Ongoing alternative entry program offered on campus through Oorala; Testing and assessment for UNE course admission; applicants are either recommended for admission to their selected UNE degree or alternatively the TRACKS Program or other tertiary study options

(see data under ‘Oorala’s Role – Access Programs’)

UNE Pathways Enabling Course

All applicants who do not meet standard entry requirements for UNE undergraduate courses  and have not successfully completed any part of a university course

Ongoing enabling program offered online through UNE; Prepares students for admission to UNE undergraduate courses (Pathways includes two Foundation units and two undergraduate units, with mentoring and additional tutorial support)

(see data for Pathways course under ‘UNE's Access Programs’)

Teacher Education Enabling Course

All applicants admitted or seeking admission to an undergraduate teacher education course who have not attained the required level of Mathematics and/or English in prior study

Ongoing enabling program offered online through UNE; Students complete a Mathematics and/or English unit that aligns to the Band 4 HSC subject descriptors (required by the Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards (BoSTES) for students intending to seek teacher registration in NSW)

(see data for Teacher Education Enabling course under ‘UNE's Access Programs’)

‘Miroma Bunbilla’ Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Pre-entry to Medicine Program

New Indigenous applicants for Joint Medical Program selecting enrolment at University of Newcastle or UNE

Eligible Indigenous applicants attend one week Program for Pre-Entry to Medicine (testing, interviews, assessments); run by Wollotuka Institute, University of Newcastle

Involvement of Oorala Student Support staff with Wollotuka in the Program;

3 Indigenous students were admitted to commence JMP at UNE in 2014

Vice-Chancellor’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Fellowship Scheme

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates

Inaugural Aboriginal Research Fellowship which commenced under this scheme for 2013-2016 continued in 2014

Level A ‘Pre-Doc’ Fellow position established in 2014 (School of Law, 3 year research fellowship for PhD candidate, with 0.5 teaching load)

Continuation of inaugural fellowship;

School of Law Fellow to be recruited in 2015

Indigenous Fellowship in Creative Practices

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates

Planned for offer in 2015 as part-time professional doctorate or HDR, Potential to build capacity for candidate to supervise Indigenous study, with supervision by Arts and mentoring from Oorala

May be offered in 2015

Diploma of Business

All students including Indigenous students

Students have option to undertake 8 Humanities units with a specific Indigenous focus (equating to an Indigenous Organisation Management major) that may lead into Bachelor of Business

No Indigenous students enrolled in Dip Business in 2014; targeted promotion required

The University's access programs include the UNE Pathways Enabling Course, the Teacher Education Enabling Course and programs offered specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through the Oorala Aboriginal Centre (see details under 'Oorala Aboriginal Centre's Role -Access Programs'). In 2014, approximately 11% of all UNE ATSI students were enrolled in these access programs through UNE or Oorala. In the 2013-2014 period, ATSI enrolments in UNE's Pathways Enabling Courses were:


Enrolments in UNE's Pathways Enabling Courses for 2013-2014
  Total Enrolments Commencing Enrolments
Course 2013 2014 2013 2014
Pathways Enabling Course 30 37 27 31
Teacher Education Enabling Course 11 16 7 11
     
Total 41 53 34 42
Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s Role - Access Programs

Oorala offers alternative entry programs specifically for Indigenous people: the Internal Selection Program (ISP) and the TRACKS Tertiary Preparation Program (TRACKS). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students receive advice through Student Services and Oorala to choose the access programs that are most appropriate to their prior learning and educational goals. Through Oorala's program activities, UNE academic staff also offer academic advice relevant to students' areas of interest.

In ISP, participating applicants for admission are assessed by Oorala to gain entry to a UNE course. In 2014, three prospective students participated in the ISP program for admission to commence undergraduate study in Trimesters 1 and 2, 2014, and Trimester 1, 2015. All of these applicants were subsequently successful in admission to UNE undergraduate courses.

In 2013 the application process for the TRACKS Program was revised to ensure admission by the most suitable applicants regarding their readiness to study at university. It was envisaged that this will lead to a smaller intake, as reflected in the enrolment data below, however over time this initiative is expected to lead to a greater retention rate. 2015 enrolments to date already show a steady increase compared to 2013-2014.

TRACKS Enrolments for 2009 through 2014
TRACKS Enrolments 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
On campus 10 7 16 14 14 8
Off campus 18 25 40 34 24 25
             
Total Enrolments 28 32 56 48 38 33

Oorala's further initiatives to improve access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students at UNE included the following in 2014:

  • From 2013 OORA1OO, 'Aboriginal Resilience and the Arts', has been listed as an elective undergraduate unit in the TRACKS Program, for students interested in Arts and Media disciplines. OORA100 provides TRACKS students the opportunity to transition into undergraduate studies by being able to take an elective unit with an Indigenous focus which, the Bradley Review defined as being critical to Indigenous engagement in higher education. The unit has been listed as a core unit for the Bachelor of Music in 2015.
  • Support mechanisms available through Oorala and UNE for TRACKS students were reviewed during 2014 and strategies developed to strengthen effectiveness of services, to improve retention and progress into undergraduate courses. These included tutorial support sessions through Oorala's Student Support Team.
  • In 2014, TRACKS students at the Woodford Correctional Centre continued to be supported by an on-site tutor for 6 hours per week. Visits to Woodford Correctional Centre for orientation and intensive support for TRACKS students by the Elder in Residence and TRACKS lecturing staff also continued. As a standard, Oorala provides learning materials in hard copy format to correctional centre students, as online Moodle materials are not accessible to these students.
  • Throughout 2014 Oorala continued to develop a partnership with New England TAFE to offer a pathway into the TRACKS Program. Oorala received HEPP funding in late 2014 for this program which commenced in 2015.
  • This cross-sectorial partnership offers the students a 'first step' towards university learning as well as providing specific foundational learning support to ensure readiness for the university learning experience. It aims to enable a greater number of Aboriginal people in the New England region to consider university study.
    There are currently five participants in the TAFE/TRACKS pathway program and two 2013 participants from the initial pilot program continue to study TRACKS in 2015.
  • Oorala was successful in attracting funding from UNE’s VC Scholars program to provide high achieving undergraduate students an opportunity to interact and mentor TRACKS students. Four scholars have taken up this opportunity; one of whom is an Indigenous student.
  • The successful Pre-Orientation Program (‘POP’) for TRACKS students continued in 2014 and into 2015. This has been linked with more support such as mentoring through Oorala’s VC Scholars and Student Retention Projects, to increase its effectiveness in early student engagement.
UNE’s Outreach activities to include and attract Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and their effectiveness

During 2014 UNE was involved in a number of community projects that would assist in generating aspiration for higher education. These outreach programs are aimed at addressing specific areas of community need, with the potential for participants to see further possibilities after achieving success in higher education. The approaches are either a natural extension of UNE academic programs or research, or making use of current UNE facilities.

An example is the HEPP funded UNE Youth Leadership Project which was designed to provide capacity building activities that develop educational aspiration among young people from low SES backgrounds in the New England North West, in conjunction with educational assessment and identification of pathways to higher education. The project had the following objectives:

  • Design and deliver a series of youth leadership workshops at UNE, its Access Centres and in local communities to support the determination of young people from low SES backgrounds within the context of educational opportunity. It also sought to:
    • Provide low SES communities with the necessary skills to develop and implement a community research strategy for the William Lindt Collection, while connecting young people with experienced community mentors, building educational aspirations and practical pathways to higher education.
    • In conjunction with the youth leadership programs, develop and distribute a series of popular role models, a media campaign and school/community resource kits to support capacity building in local communities during and beyond the life of the project.

Details of other outreach activities that were undertaken by UNE during 2014 are provided below.

Other outreach activities conducted by UNE during 2014

Outreach activity

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

Education and Skills Forums on the mid-North Coast of NSW

All

Participation in these forums encourage collaborative partnerships with the communities we serve

Community relationships strengthened

Elder in Residence Program

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Oorala Elder in Residence has advisory role to Oorala and UNE on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student and community engagement and protocols

Elder in residence involved in Oorala and official UNE functions, community networks; representation on key committees and other groups

Increased Oorala involvement with local Elders’ groups

Stellar Program –HEPPP funded in partnership with SCU

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Low SES future students

Stellar facilitates aspirational programs and workshops for low socio economic and Indigenous students attending Year 7 to 10 at Clarence Valley High Schools

83% of students expressed an increased confidence they could go to university

UNE Youth Leadership Project

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Low SES future students; see details below on programs through the project aimed at specific age groups of ATSI youth and others

HEPPP funded set of leadership programs including workshops and capacity building for higher education, in partnership with Aboriginal Land Councils across the Northern Region for leadership training, fostering engagement, maintenance of current education pathways, educational aspiration and awareness, address health and domestic issues.

20 leadership workshops; consistent  attendance at weekly leadership workshops; excellent participation at ‘Light the Fire’ event; advanced standing into UNE Pathways program; recruitment of role models; funding sought to extend project into 2015

 

‘Get Active Days’ (Years 7-10 male and female Aboriginal school students from Armidale, Guyra and Walcha; aimed at students ‘at risk’ of disengaging with school and community)

Series of weekly physical activities designed to engage young Aboriginal people; program included self-esteem and confidence building in the context of youth leadership

‘Get Active’ encouraged and maintained pathways and fostering of aspirations into future education for 15 students referred into the program by local schools; multiple full day sessions held weekly outside school hours at sport and gym facilities

 

Connected Communities Youth Leadership Workshops (Year 10 Aboriginal school students, Moree Secondary College)

Initial broad spectrum Leadership workshops to be held for Moree students, follow up sessions planned

32 students attended initial workshops in Moree; excellent feedback from student participants and school

 

‘Kaih Alinta’ – Girls Engagement/Leadership Workshops (Year 10 female students, Armidale High School; for students ‘at risk’ of disengaging from high school)

Developed to engage local female students, based on model developed through ‘Lighting the Fire’ camp materials

Session programs developed and pilot group established; 7 Aboriginal female students enrolled in the program in Armidale; Kaih Alinta program then linked with local ‘BackTrack’ program which aimed at the same target group, sharing resources and support mechanisms

 

‘Mums & Bubs’ Trial Sessions (Aboriginal mothers aged 18-24 years in Armidale)

In partnership with Hunter New England Community Health’s Mothers and Babies program and Medicare Local, sessions planned to re-engage young mothers into exercise, group social activities and discussion with crèche service provided.

Community Health and Medicare Local ran ‘Mums &  Bubs’ sessions at Sport UNE; 4 mothers and 5 babies participated

    
 

‘Light the Fire’ Walcha Family & Community Engagement Day (Aboriginal children 0-15 years and Parents/carers 18-70 years in Walcha), including ‘Light the Fire Aboriginal Youth Leadership workshop’ for Aboriginal youth aged 13-16 years

Engagement event to be held at Walcha Central School by ‘Light the Fire’ project in partnership with Walcha Family Support and Walcha Aboriginal Lands Council

Program included the ‘Light the Fire’ Aboriginal Youth Leadership workshop, support workshop on health and domestic violence issues. The event also raised awareness of higher education pathways for Aboriginal people, and  promotion of Youth Leadership Project events (Knockout Touch Footy Competition and ‘Light the Fire’ Aboriginal Youth Leadership camp); 20 parents/carers and 57 children participated at the event

 

Aboriginal Rugby League Touch Footy Knockout Tournament (mixed age target group, male and female Aboriginal people from northern region of NSW)

A major component of the Aboriginal Youth Leadership project aimed to hold a one day football competition at Sport UNE for 12 mixed gender teams through the Northern Region Aboriginal Lands Council network

120 team members participated and approx. 200-300 supporters, families and spectators attended, from Aboriginal communities in Armidale, Uralla, Walcha, Tamworth, Inverell, Glen Innes and Guyra

 

‘Light the Fire’ Youth Leadership Camp (for Aboriginal male and female youth aged 14-20 years from across local regions)

The second major Aboriginal youth leadership camp to be held over 3 days through ‘Light the Fire’ at the Echidna Gully bush camp complex near Armidale. The culminating event of the UNE Youth Leadership project and its associated 2014 activities.

Successful Leadership camp held following the Footy Knockout: Eight team leaders were recruited as casual employees to supervise camp participants, four of those supervising had been participants in the 2013 ‘Light the Fire’ camp; 44 participants attended, most of whom had engaged with other Youth Leadership project activities during 2014

Youth reengagement programs (BackTrack and Clontarf)

BackTrack through Jobs Australia targets disadvantaged youth

Armidale Clontarf Academy at Armidale High School runs programs for Aboriginal boys Years 7 to 12, see http:www.clontarf.org.au

Funded by SportUNE; Health and wellbeing programs;

support for Backtrack pilot Program, to improve health and wellbeing of youth from Indigenous and low SES backgrounds; Clontarf engages school students with education, employment and community through football and wellbeing programs

For Backtrack SportUNE developed customised exercise and nutritional program for participants, personal trainer, membership passes and gym equipment for Backtrack School in Armidale

For Clontarf: SportUNE and UNE supported a major cricket carnival for Clontarf Academies involving Aboriginal role models

Implementation of the QuickSmart program in schools, prisons and remote workplaces

Educationally disadvantaged groups who are experiencing learning problems or delays and, hence, not achieving their academic potential. (see simerr.une.edu.au/quicksmart/)

The QuickSmart program is a responsive small-group intervention that aims to develop fluent (Quick) and efficient (Smart) strategy use. QuickSmart uses research-based instructional strategies to support the learning of persistently low-achieving middle school students so that they are more actively and successfully engaged in inclusive classroom settings.

Independent (federal, state-wide or standardised tests) assessments gathered from QuickSmart and comparison students over ten years consistently show that Indigenous and non-Indigenous QuickSmart students have made substantial academic improvement.

Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s Role – Outreach Activities

In 2014 the Oorala Aboriginal Centre worked with approximately 26 schools and communities to enhance community engagement and access to educational opportunities and services through ongoing contact with the Centre. The Centre’s outreach is firmly linked with its retention initiatives and Oorala’s outreach role also included:

  • Involvement of Oorala’s Elder in Residence with Student Support staff and UNE’s School Liaison and Future Student teams on school visits to local schools to raise awareness of UNE, the UNE Open Day and the programs offered specifically for Aboriginal students, generating substantial
    follow-up inquiry.
  • Parent information sessions to build relationships with Aboriginal students and their families through local schools.
  • School visits to Oorala and UNE during 2014 included: Boggabilla Central School, Mungindi Central School, Collarenebri Central School, Armidale High Clontarf Group, Oxley High School, Tamworth High School & Farrer High School.
  • Information sessions at Oorala with current Aboriginal Education Officers (AEOs) who are located in local schools (Walcha to Guyra) to address the future educational needs of the schools' students and AEOs.
  • Working with the HEPP funded Stellar Project (running in the Clarence River), providing information on Oorala’s support services and alternative entry programs.
  • Promotion of scholarship opportunities on Oorala’s webpage and regular information sessions included in Oorala’s student support, retention activities, community outreach and programs.
  • Representation by Oorala staff at local Public School Annual Award Presentations and sponsorship of school awards.
Indigenous-specific and other scholarships offered by UNE

New 2014 Indigenous Commonwealth Equity Scholarships

New Indigenous Commonwealth Equity Scholarships offered in 2014

Scholarship details

Government/

Private/University

No. Allocated

Cost

No. Awarded

Comments

IAS

Government

27

$4,702

17

 

ICAS

Government

11

$4,985

7

6 ICAS initially allocated, a further 5 allocated during 2014

IECAS

Government

12

$4,985

1

 

ICECS

Government

21

$2,492

14

 

IECECS

Government

25

$2,492

3

 
      

Total

 

96

 

42

 

Continuing 2014 Indigenous Commonwealth Equity Scholarships

Indigenous Commonwealth Equity Scholarships offered in 2014 

Scholarship details

Government/

Private/University

No. Allocated

Cost

No. Awarded

Comments

ICAS

Government

13

$4,985

5

 

ICECS

Government

30

$2,492

11

 
      

Total

Government

43

 

16

 

2014 UNE Scholarships - Undergraduate

UNE Undergraduate Scholarships offered in 2014

Scholarship details

Government/

Private/University

No. Allocated

Cost

No. Awarded

Comments

Indigenous-specific scholarships

 

 

 

 

 

Ella Schroder Indigenous Residential Scholarship

University

2

Annual Accommodation cost to a maximum of $10,000

2

 

Max Schroder Scholarship

University

4

$6,000 per annum for the duration of Course with a 4 year maximum

4

 

Max Schroder Indigenous Mentoring Scholarship

University

1

Full residential scholarship (exc meals) or up to $8000pa

1

Open to final year undergraduate students or postgraduate students - awarded to postgraduate  student in 2014 (Master of Environmental Advocacy)

Annie and Terry Connor Memorial Scholarship

University

1

$5,000 per annum full-time or $2,500 per annum part-time

1

 

Max Schroder SportUNE  Scholarship

University

1

$3000 for 1 Year

0

No applicants in 2014

      

Total Indigenous-specific

 

9

 

8

 

      

Other Scholarships

 

 

 

 

 

Equity Scholarships (Open to Equity Groups)

Country Women’s Association of NSW/Earle Page College Equity Scholarship

4

$2,000 per annum for 1 year

0

Open to applicants from Equity groups; high number of applications (2 out of 74 applicants were Indigenous)

4 scholarships awarded to non-Indigenous applicants in 2014

Scholarships for Low SES Applicants

Social Inclusion

10

$5,000- 1 off payment

1

Open to 1st year off campus applicants commencing in Trimester 3, 2014; 3 out of 54 applicants were Indigenous;

9 scholarships awarded to non-Indigenous applicants in 2014

      

Total Other Scholarships

 

14

 

1

 

      
      

Total of All

 

23

 

9

 

Postgraduate

UNE Postgraduate Scholarships offered in 2014

Scholarship details

Government/

Private/University

No. Allocated

Cost

No. Awarded

Comments

Indigenous-specific scholarships

 

 

 

 

 

Apted Honours and Postgraduate Scholarship for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Students

University

3

2x $10,000, 1x $5,000

Total  $25,000

3

All applicants received part or full funding requested

Promotion of scholarships to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

UNE promotion of scholarship opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in 2014 included:

Scholarship take-up rates

2014 take-up rates were as follows for scholarships offered for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students:

  • The take-up rate for Indigenous-specific UNE undergraduate scholarships improved in 2014 compared to 2013, however the take-up rate for other UNE undergraduate scholarships was low compared to previous years.
  • The overall take-up for Commonwealth Equity Scholarships in 2014 was 44%, and this had declined compared to the 63% take-up rate in 2013.
  • 100% take-up rate for postgraduate scholarships offered for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

The following factors may have affected 2014 take-up rates for Commonwealth Equity Scholarships and are being reviewed by UNE in 2015:

  • Requirements of supporting documentation to be submitted by applicants.
  • Since the introduction of trimesters at UNE in 2012, for CES applicants who do not demonstrate exceptional circumstances for part-time study, UNE has required students to be enrolled full-time in Trimesters 1 and 2 (3-4 units each trimester).

As take-up rates for Commonwealth Equity Scholarships (CES) were considerably lower in 2014 than in previous years, strategies to address these factors and increased promotion and support for applicants have resulted in greatly improved take-up rates in 2015.

Indigenous Education / Support Unit’s role

Oorala's role in ensuring equitable access of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to higher education can be found above below the sections:

  • Programs run by UNE to improve access by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, and
  • UNE's Outreach activities to include and attract Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and their effectiveness.
4. Achieve the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in higher education, at rates commensurate with those of all other Australians.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

The total number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student enrolments (all student comparison, 2013-2014

The total number of ATSI enrolments at UNE exceeded the targets set in the Compact for all (530 in 2013 and 560 in 2014). In 2014, the largest number of ATSI students were undertaking programs in the School of Education (23.8%), the School of Health (12.7%) and the School of Law (9.2%).

ATSI and Non-ATSI student enrolments for the years 2013 and 2014

Student Enrolments

2013

2014

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students:

570

594

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (Domestic students only):

20,745

21,369

UNE Strategies to address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student participation

As detailed in 1.3, participation by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in higher education, is one of UNE’s strategic priorities stated in the Compact and other key documents. UNE’s Research Plan 2012-2015 emphasises pathways and academic support programs as strategies to address participation in higher degree programs. The Regional Aboriginal Higher Education Strategy (RAHES) also prioritises Community Engagement principles as key to meeting strategic goals in participation and other educational outcomes. Specifically the RAHES expresses a commitment to building and maintaining relationships with regional Aboriginal communities and providing a culturally safe environment for Aboriginal students and staff.

The services, facilities and engagement activities through Oorala Aboriginal Centre are pivotal in UNE’s participation strategies, as well as the academic programs through UNE Schools which consistently attract strong continuing enrolments from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. Since 2010 there has been a 52.5% increase in continuing enrolments in UNE’s undergraduate and postgraduate awards.

Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s Role - Participation

In 2014, Oorala’s strategies to improve participation included:

  • Oorala’s Student Relationship Officer/Elder in Residence and the Convenor of the TRACKS Program visited students and Education staff at Woodford Correctional Centre, South East Queensland. Oorala discussed with the students their progress in TRACKS, plans for further study at UNE and learning materials.
  • Orientation activities including the Centre’s Pre-Orientation Program (‘POP’) for on and off campus TRACKS students and involvement in major UNE orientation events for commencing UNE students (‘Townies’ Welcome BBQ, Lifesaver Day, etc), to foster early engagement and participation by local and regional students.
  • Oorala’s Student Retention Project increased the Centre’s capacity for student engagement with its support services and ITAS tutoring, including workshops, visits to prospective and enrolled students in regional communities and involvement of local Elders and community groups in on campus engagement activities.
  • Involvement in ‘Youth Expo’ and ‘Well Fair Day’ at UNE, ‘A Day in the Dale’ organised by Armidale Dumaresq Council and other events with the UNE and local communities featuring Aboriginal services, organisations and local cultural activities.
  • Oorala submitted and supported a number of proposals for HEPPP funded projects to increase Aboriginal people’s participation from target regions in higher education through community engagement. Oorala has been successful in most of its proposals which are commencing in 2015, including extension of funding for its Student Retention Project.
  • A UNE team was organised by the Indigenous Student Association with support from UNE, Oorala and other sponsors to participate in the National Indigenous Tertiary Education Student Games held at the University of Western Australia.
  • Items noted under Oorala’s role in Access, Outreach and Support are also relevant to participation.
Strategies to improve ATSI student participation

Strategies

Outline of strategies

Constraints

Outcome

Build the number of indigenous HDR students

Three new Apted Honours and Postgraduate Scholarships offered for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Students (2014). Research Fellowships through Vice-Chancellor’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Fellowship Scheme (from 2013). New HDR Participation Scholarships for ATSI Masters and PhD students (2015).

 

 

All new Apted scholarships awarded in 2014.

Continuation of inaugural Fellowship;

School of Law Fellow to be recruited in 2015. 4 new UNE HDR Participation Scholarships for ATSI Masters and PhD students to be offered in 2015.

 (see details under ‘Programs to improve access’)

UNE Business School continued to offer courses with Indigenous content

 

Dependent upon allocation of targeted promotion to prospective students

ATSI enrolments in Business have remained steady (25 in 2013, 28 in 2014) for courses from Diploma through to undergraduate and postgraduate level, with a promising increase in postgraduate Business degree enrolments (8 in 2013, 12 in 2014)

UNE MATSITI Exploratory Research Project

Funded by the ‘More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teachers Initiative’ (MATSITI), commenced in 2014 by School of Education with Oorala Aboriginal Centre, includes strategy development to improve participation by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teacher education students at UNE.

MATSITI Funding guidelines and voluntary student participation

Student surveys, analysis and consultations undertaken in 2014. The research phase will conclude in 2015 and a follow-up action phase will commence in 2016.

5. Enable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to attain the same graduation rates from award courses in higher education as for other Australians.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

Total number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student completions at Bachelor level and above (all student comparison, 2013-2014)

The totals for ATSI completions at Bachelor level and above (48 in 2013, 62 in 2014) exceed the targets set for all ATSI student completions in the Compact (45 in 2013 and 47 in 2014). In addition to the completion data in the table above there were completions by ATSI students in undergraduate courses below Bachelor level (one in 2013, two in 2014).

ATSI and Non-ATSI student completions

 Student completions by degree type

2013

2014

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Higher Degree)

12

10

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Higher Degree)

864

883

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Other postgraduate)

4

13

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Other postgraduate)

907

836

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Bachelor degree)

32

39

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Bachelor degree)

1,625

1,768

UNE Support mechanisms for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students
 Support mechanisms for ATSI students at UNE

Support mechanisms

Description

Constraints

Outcome

Oorala Student Retention Project

HEPP funded project to improve retention rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander undergraduate students, including a number of strategies to support academic progress (e.g. proposed academic skills camp or workshop, stronger engagement of students with Oorala and UNE support mechanisms and increase of student take-up rate for ITAS tutoring)

Project initially funded for 2014, new funding submission required to extend project into 2015

Successful workshop held in Trimester 3, 2014, strategic student and community engagement visits implemented throughout 2014, increase in students accessing ITAS tutoring and improved academic outcomes; Project successful in funding round for 2015 and further workshops and retention activities planned for 2015

Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme (ITAS)

Provides additional academic tutorial assistance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students; coordinated by Oorala with Commonwealth funding

Scope limited by ITAS funding guidelines and availability of ongoing funding;

Availability of suitable tutors in local areas for off campus students in non-local regions

Intensive promotion and other strategies resulted in increased no. of students tutored (from 32 in 2013 to 53 in 2014) and increase in number of hours for which students were tutored (1,149 in 2013; 2,330 in 2014).

Targeted Library Orientation Sessions

Run by Dixson Library to inform Indigenous students about its function, services and resources

Funding and staff resource limitations

Increased student engagement with the Library; service to be reviewed regularly with Indigenous staff and students

Peer Assisted Library Support (‘PALS’) Program

Run by Dixson Library from T2 2014 to engage and support all UNE students requiring librarian and technical assistance, especially those in first year of study. ‘PALS’ to be recruited as student casuals from current UNE enrolments for this service.

 

Twelve ‘PALS’ recruited in 2014, including one ATSI student, providing peer support.

Further PALS training and ongoing service resourced in 2015.

Establish alternative pathways and academic support programs that address Indigenous and low SES student participation in higher degree programs.

Stated as initiative 1.1.7 of the UNE Research Plan; Support mechanisms include establishment of 4 new UNE HDR Participation Scholarships for ATSI Masters and PhD students.

 

HDR Participation Scholarships for ATSI students to be offered in 2015.

UNE MATSITI Exploratory Research Project

Funded by the ‘More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teachers Initiative’ (MATSITI), commenced in 2014 by School of Education with Oorala Aboriginal Centre as a project partner, to expand support strategies which aim to improve retention and graduation rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teacher education students at UNE.

MATSITI Funding guidelines and voluntary student participation

Student surveys, analysis and consultations undertaken in 2014. The research phase will conclude in 2015 and a follow-up action phase will commence in 2016.

The UNE Residential system is a large contributor to the on-campus student experience and in 2014 UNE considered new strategies for its residential system to better support Indigenous students, such as greater inclusion of cultural safety considerations, community relationships and representation to influence the college environment. Costs of study and accommodation, especially for on campus students, are also factors that impact upon support requirements and UNE reviewed the need for more intensive promotion of scholarship opportunities for Indigenous students, or potential for more Indigenous-specific scholarships to be offered.

Indigenous attrition has been identified as higher in those universities that have more flexible admission. In response UNE has flagged its engagement with Indigenous students as being critical to retention and success, especially in areas which have direct student contact. A broad approach has been recommended starting with staff training to develop competencies and awareness of the specific support needs of Indigenous students. Some outcomes include the provision of development for staff to scaffold a broader action plan (developed in conjunction with Oorala) aimed at increasing the enrolment, retention and graduation of Indigenous students.  Also plans for an ongoing Indigenous scholar position with the objective of increasing Indigenous enrolments and completions in Arts courses were developed to promote student access and social inclusion, and to enhance integration with Oorala.

Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s Role – Support Mechanisms

Oorala’s initiatives in student support and involvement with UNE to improve graduation rates included:

  • Oorala provides support for TRACKS and TAFE Pathways students, as well as for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in UNE courses. Key elements include Oorala’s orientation and project activities, ITAS tutoring, mentoring, community networks, online support hubs through Moodle and development of a multi-faceted approach collaborating with UNE’s services on engagement and retention.
  • Collaboration with UNE Schools and First Year Advisors to increase the uptake rate of ITAS tutoring and the pool of suitably qualified ITAS tutors, especially where students needed more targeted support such as Health and Law disciplines, or off campus students in remote areas. Promotion of ITAS tutoring through on campus sessions and retention visits resulted in improved uptake rates and outcomes. In Trimester 1 of 2014 80% of students receiving ITAS tutoring obtained pass grades or higher.
  • Ongoing advice and support on scholarship and Abstudy matters, intensive schools and clinical placements.
  • Mentoring and socio-cultural support through the Elder in Residence/Student Relationship Officer assists student adjustment to university life. This staff member also joined UNE’s Special Needs Contact Network to provide specific support to special needs students and advise on UNE’s Disability Action Plan.
  • ‘Yarn-up’ event for commencing, continuing and future Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students with participation from 21 organisations and UNE service providers, to foster ongoing support networks for student peer groups with services in accommodation, health, careers, financial assistance and academic support.
  • Information sessions by ‘Career Trackers’ and motivational presentation by an Indigenous Educational Ambassador.
  • Event hosted at Oorala linking local community health providers with Aboriginal students in UNE Health awards, to improve arrangements for clinical and work placements.
  • Maintenance of Oorala’s focus on providing a culturally safe place for students, including study and learning facilities, equipment (computers, internet, printing, scanning, copying, etc) and social spaces.
  • Seven retention and engagement visits to target areas which had shown high attrition rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (North Western NSW and North Coast of NSW). Visits included workshops and face-to-face group or individual support.
  • Continued liaison and collaboration with UNE Schools and Student Administration Services to identify strategies for improved outcomes, and visits to Aboriginal Support Units at other universities to review ‘best practice’ in support. Work with UNE included a focus on admission and enrolment processes, course requirements, advice and advocacy on academic progress issues, liaison with unit coordinators and referrals to specialised support services (first year advisors, Academic Skills Office, counsellors, etc.)
  • Following Oorala’s participation as a research partner in the project ‘The transition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students into higher education’, funded in 2011 by the Australian Government’s Office for Learning & Teaching (OLT), the ‘Student Voices’ website was launched in 2014 to help Aboriginal students entering university. The information in this website has been collected from 96 Aboriginal university students who told the research team of their experiences of studying in bridging programs, undergraduate degrees and postgraduate degrees.  Student participants came from Curtin University (Perth, WA); Charles Darwin University (Darwin, NT); The University of New England (Armidale, NSW); and Monash University (Melbourne, Vic) (see: http://www.ahetp.edu.au/studentvoices ).
  • Oorala was a project partner with School of Education in the UNE MATSITI Exploratory Research Project. The Centre’s academics and student support staff provided consultation to the project’s research group to expand support strategies for ATSI teacher education students at UNE with the aim of increasing retention and completion. Surveys and discussion groups were developed and implemented in 2014, with data collection continuing in 2015 and activation of strategies planned to commence in 2016. Oorala’s involvement broadened the School’s awareness of culturally relevant and authentic ways in which to support Indigenous students.
  • Oorala also provided input to School of Education on other support methods for education students, e.g. specific orientation initiatives, cultural awareness training for School staff and pathways for AEO’s into education degrees.
6. To provide all Australian students with an understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander traditional and contemporary cultures.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

Indigenous perspectives in curriculum at UNE

The UNE Graduate Attributes are the generic characteristics and personal qualities that define UNE graduates, together with the core knowledge, skills and capabilities specific to a student’s course of study and are therefore embedded in course learning outcomes. Course mapping is a means by which UNE ensures that graduate attributes are given an appropriate focus which may be discipline-nuanced, are aligned with course content and are achieved. The attribute of ethical conduct and social responsibility instils in UNE graduates the ability to recognise, reflect on and respond appropriately to social, cultural and ethical issues.

In 2014 UNE identified that a whole-of-university approach requires Indigenous cultural content to be included in units and a more inclusive approach to pedagogy. This makes the content more accessible to Indigenous students, as well as increasing the cultural capital and competency of the University as a whole and of students in their learning and qualifications.  During 2014, the Oorala Director engaged pro-actively with UNE’s Schools including Arts, Education, Law, Health, Humanities and UNE Business School, to improve linkage and discussion on Indigenous knowledges in curriculum.

The School of Health continues to work in collaboration with Indigenous stakeholder groups such as the peak body CATSINaM (Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives) to ensure that the nursing curriculum at UNE reflects a strong Indigenous health component. The School also adheres to the Australian Nursing and Midwives Association Committee’s accreditation requirement that nursing curriculum include an Indigenous health focus.

Several clinical practice settings for students have been available including placement in an Indigenous community health setting, for example Coledale Community, Tamworth. An Indigenous focus is further incorporated into other core units in the pre-registration Nursing program.

Oorala linked with the School of Education’s Indigenous Research Network, which included discussion on Indigenous knowledges in curriculum and involvement in the School’s MATSITI project. Student Support staff also presented Aboriginal perspectives to 3rd year tutorials in UNE’s Joint Medical Program and were involved in cultural competency training arrangements for remote community placements in Pharmacy. Cultural knowledge and perspectives were provided to UNE’s Indigenous Archaeology course and proposals for School of Arts to facilitate student seminars on this discipline. UNE Schools also worked with Oorala to generate a more ‘authentic expression’ within a number of courses and are actively seeking to embrace a more culturally sensitive approach to knowledge.

Oorala offers the units OORA100/300: Aboriginal Resilience and the Arts and OORA200/400: Working with Aboriginal People which are included in the TRACKS Program, undergraduate and postgraduate UNE courses as core or listed units as outlined below.

In 2014 Oorala’s ‘OORA’ units were offered within a number of UNE courses as core, listed or elective units.  These include Bachelor degrees in Nursing, Social Work, Social Science, Criminology, Criminology/Law, Theatre and Performance, Media and Communications and Education (Primary), with plans in place for inclusion in other courses in 2015. OORA200 is also a core unit in the Master of Nursing Practice.

Enrolments in OORA units in 2014 were as follows:

The number of students enrolling in Oorala's OORA units during 2014

Unit

Enrolments

OORA100

10

OORA200

170

OORA300

19

OORA400

3

  

Total

202

The units are offered on campus and online in Trimesters 1 and 2 and attract Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, other domestic students and a significant cohort of international students.

During 2014 there were an additional 21 units of study offered providing specific Indigenous content across UNE courses.  These include:

  • Ten units through School of Humanities in the Bachelor of Arts Indigenous Studies major, which address the Australian context and comparisons with international examples, in subject areas such as contemporary issues, policy, health, business, archaeology and history. Eight of these units also form the major in Indigenous Organisation Management within the Diploma of Business offered by UNE Business School.
  • The EDCX unit Aboriginal Education which is mandatory across all of the School of Education’s Teaching awards at Bachelor and Masters level. The unit is presented in conjunction with Indigenous Education Consultants from the Tamworth office of the NSW Department of Education & Training and at 300 and 500 level requires students to complete 20 days Professional Experience.
  • EDCX 515 Indigenous Australian Education: Issues and Policies, which is a key unit in the Master of Education (coursework) and EDSS328/428 Secondary Education: Aboriginal Studies, offered in Teaching degrees for secondary teachers.
  • Units through School of Health including HSNS231 Nursing Australian Indigenous People, an elective in Nursing degrees, and four units offered through Counselling degrees.
  • LING366 Australia’s Indigenous Languages, offered through School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences
  • Two law units, LS364 Indigenous Australians and Law, included in undergraduate Law degrees and the Indigenous Studies major in Bachelor of Arts, and the postgraduate unit LLM632 Indigenous Natural Resource Issues and the Law which has a focus on protection of Indigenous cultural knowledge.

There were also units offered with some Indigenous content:

  • Indigenous content is embedded in a number of courses and units through UNE Business School, e.g. GSB722 ‘Managing Diversity’ which includes the main study topic ‘Employing Indigenous Australians’; also MM200 ‘Contemporary Management’ has a broad focus on cultural diversity and social inclusion is addressed. The UNE Business School’s Master of Economic and Regional Development includes a major in Indigenous Futures which seeks to prepare students for a career involved in community and regional development projects.
  • Indigenous content in School of Law is incorporated into 12 or more undergraduate core or elective units at first year through to third year level. An example is the unit LS357 ‘Alternative Dispute Resolution’ which includes a topic examining dispute resolution processes of Australian Indigenous people, comparing and contrasting these with mainstream processes, and the implications of cross-cultural ADR process.
  • All Bachelor of Nursing / Master of Nursing units in School of Health contain at least one theme of Indigenous Health focused learning, including understanding and respect for traditional and contemporary Indigenous culture. The elective unit HSNS527 Rural and Remote Contexts of Practice has a major component of Indigenous content.
  • Through the School of Environmental & Rural Science, Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander perspectives are presented in CANI310/510 ‘Wild Dog Ecology’ in relation to the role of dogs in Indigenous societies, and the influence of customs and culture on wild dog management and dingo conservation. The unit includes teaching materials produced by Aboriginal people and an opportunity for students to gain Aboriginal community experience through participating in a dog health program in the Tiwi Islands.
How UNE addresses the cultural competency of its staff and students

Cultural awareness training has been made available to all staff by UNE’s Human Resource Services directorate to improve staff competencies in engagement with students and staff from diverse cultural backgrounds.

A one day pilot cultural awareness program was offered and delivered to staff across the School of Environmental Rural Sciences. After this initial program it was decided that a more in-depth cultural immersion program would be more appropriate and would affect greater attitudinal change across the University. The immersion program will be run over two days, with one day on campus and the next visiting sites of cultural significance in the local area under the guidance of local Aboriginal Elders and National Parks. Human Resource Services are currently in the process of investigating, costing and implementing such an Aboriginal Cultural Immersion Program of which it is anticipated a pilot will be delivered in August 2015.

Cultural awareness training has application to the general UNE student body, especially for those students who may engage professionally with Indigenous people through practical placements or as early career graduates going into their field, and students who benefit from developing their overall professional skills.  For example, Medical students who attended University Departments of Rural Health in Tamworth or Taree undertook cultural training.

Cultural competency for UNE students is largely through Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander content and perspectives in curriculum and involvement by Elders and community members in a range of professional networks, events, programs and projects. The increased involvement of Aboriginal representatives on UNE Council and the Human Research Ethics Committee also serves to enhance the level of cultural competency in high level consultation and decision-making on governance, teaching and research matters.

UNE’s new website launched in 2014 included the link ‘Information for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community’, accessible on the UNE homepage by public, staff and students. This makes more prominent the online presence of UNE’s ‘Acknowledgement of Country’ statement, Reconciliation Statement, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy, course and unit information and other relevant information.

UNE’s involvement with Indigenous community members in working toward this goal

Welcome to Country presented by Aboriginal community members or Acknowledgement of Country is a quality standard in UNE official proceedings including meetings of the UNE Council and its Committees, Graduation Ceremonies, Orientation and other major events through Schools and Directorates.

The annual Frank Archibald Memorial Lecture and NAIDOC Ceremony are two key UNE events in the University’s community engagement, coordinated by Oorala with UNE. Both events involve a high level of Aboriginal community protocol and participation in their official proceedings and associated activities. Established in 1986, the Archibald Lecture is Australia’s longest running university lecture in honour of an Aboriginal person and is dedicated to Mr Frank Archibald, a revered Aboriginal community member of the Armidale area, as well as his descendants and Aboriginal people of the New England region.

Several UNE research projects specifically relate to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander issues and culture, linking with UNE curriculum and extensive community involvement. One example is the ARC research project which had commenced in 2012 on 'Indigenous heritage: working ancient wetlands for social benefit and cultural understanding' which focuses on the local New England region, and its archaeology. This research is being carried out in partnership with a number of Local Aboriginal Land Councils and in 2014 involved field trips to sites of significance with participation from UNE’s Archaeology discipline, Aboriginal cultural advisors and young Aboriginal people engaging in training and education.

UNE’s Indigenous Education Research Network (IERN) lead by academics in the School of Education during 2014 worked in partnership with Oorala, an Aboriginal Advisory Group and researchers from other UNE Schools, to align SOE’s research with Aboriginal-determined priorities. The IERN has worked towards addressing areas such as greater inclusion of Aboriginal perspectives in the Teacher Education curriculum, and how research, pedagogical and institutional practices engage with Indigenous knowledges. The Network also supports development of relevant research projects by SOE staff and HDR students, building research capacity that will contribute to addressing Indigenous disadvantage in education. Projects in 2014 included:

  • Study of retention of Aboriginal teacher education students - MATSITI funded project involving quantitative and qualitative surveys of about student experiences
  • Reconstructing the Lower Southern Aranda/Wangkangurru Identity: Post-colonial approaches to Indigenous knowledge and learning, in partnership with Aranda/Wangkangurru communities in South Australia/NT
  • Aboriginal adult literacy campaign evaluation/longitudinal study – a partnership with the Literacy for Life Foundation and participating communities in western NSW
  • “Have we met before?”: Historical Consciousness and education research in Aboriginal Communities, involving an Aboriginal researcher to collect oral histories of UNE’s involvement with Aboriginal community development and community education in the 1960s and 1970s

UNE has been awarded an Australian Government grant to manage a Collaborative Research Network (CRN) on Mental Health and Well-being in Rural and Regional Communities, in collaboration with four partner universities and Hunter New England Local Health District (HNELHD). The CRN involves Research Services with a number of UNE Schools with research interests related to mental health and well-being in building links with rural communities and health providers and a focus on three thematic areas. For example one of School of Health’s core research areas in the CRN is ‘Improving health and well-being of rural and regional communities, including Indigenous communities’.

Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s Role in Cultural Competency at UNE
  • OORA units offered through Oorala have enhanced the opportunities for undergraduate and postgraduate students to study Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander content within their degrees.
  • Oorala includes Aboriginal guest presenters in lectures for OORA units and input from the Elder in Residence and other Aboriginal staff into cultural perspectives for the Centre’s TRACKS Program. Program activities included excursions to local sites of cultural significance with community presenters.
  • Oorala Aboriginal Student Support staff provide input to UNE First Year Advisors on cultural awareness training.
  • The Director co-authored a published paper examining cultural safety offered to Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students within their university environments (Rochecouste, J., Oliver, R., Bennell, D., (2014) Is there Cultural Safety in Australian Universities?). The Oorala Director was invited to be a Cluster Leader in the 2014 OLT National Teaching Fellowship - Aboriginal knowledges in higher education in the 21st Century (in partnership with Fellowship Leader: A/Professor Karen Martin,   Griffith University). This project aims to advance the education issues regarding Aboriginal participation and outcomes in higher education and cultural competency in learning, teaching and leadership.
  • The Director participated in the Australian Indigenous Psychology Education Project (AIPEP), funded by The Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) with a collaborative project team lead by the University of Western Australia to investigate Curricular approaches to increasing cultural competence and Indigenous participation in psychology education and training. Oorala’s Elder in Residence presents Welcome to Country at official UNE events and in Oorala’s student activities, also participating on several local community committees and boards and providing consultation to UNE projects such as the ‘Ancient Wetlands’ project.
  • Oorala Director and Aboriginal staff supported the East Armidale Community Garden, a postdoctoral research project Nourishing Culture and Developing Social Capital in a Community Garden. The project leader collaborates with members of Armidale's Aboriginal community and local organisations as partners, to develop a garden in East Armidale on the border of Narwan Village, a former Aboriginal reserve, with a focus on positive engagement with place through caring for Country. Oorala endorsed and agreed to participate in the Southern Cross University research project ‘Successful options for the Indigenous Tutor Assistance Scheme Tertiary Tuition (ITAS-TT) in NSW regional universities’. The project investigates the views and experiences of students, tutors and personnel working in Indigenous support units in relation to the current operation of the ITAS-TT tutoring scheme.
  • The 2014 NAIDOC event hosted by Oorala involved UNE, student and community representatives who spoke on the theme ‘Serving Country: Centenary and Beyond’ and the contribution of generations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have served in Australia’s defence forces from the Boer War, the First and Second World Wars, through to contemporary military conflicts across the globe.
  • The 2014 Frank Archibald Memorial Lecture was presented by Mr Romlie Mokak, Chief Executive Officer of the Lowitja Institute, on ‘Our People in Professions: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their representative bodies shaping the future for our people.’ One of the successes in Oorala’s 2014 community engagement was increased involvement by local Aboriginal Elders’ groups in the Centre’s events, programs and student support activities.

Oorala’s Director and key staff attended the following to maintain development of cultural competency within the Centre’s role at UNE:

  • Australian Institute of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) National Indigenous Studies Conference (2): Oorala Director and Oorala Elder in Residence
  • Queensland University of Technology (QUT) led National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Strategy and Portal Projects (2): Oorala Director and Oorala staff member
  • World Indigenous Peoples Conference of Education (WiPC:e2014 – Honolulu) (1): Oorala Director.

Section 2: Expenditure of Indigenous support program grant  (Attachment 1)

Please use the financial acquittal template attached to report on the expenditure of your University’s ISP grant for 2014, noting that a breakdown of expenditure is required.  Where ISP expenditure does not match the audited annual financial statements for the year ending 31 December 2014 provided under section 19-10 of Higher Education Support Act 2003, please provide a reconciliation.

This ISP report is a legislated requirement, under the Higher Education Support Act 2003Other Grants Guidelines (Education) 2008.
Financial Acquittal

Organisation: University of New England

Postal Address: Armidale NSW

Contact Person: Lyndel Taylor

Financial Acquittal

This financial acquittal proforma is designed to acquit all ISP Funds provided in 2014, including all interest or royalties/income derived from ISP Funds during 2014. 

Attachment

 

AttachmentChecklist
1: Indigenous Support Program (ISP)X

For each Attachment:

  • Part A seeks information on the GST component of funding provided to you under that element, if applicable.
    • If GST is paid to you, the amount of GST funding which is included in each payment is set out in a Recipient Created Tax Invoice (RCTI) issued to you at the time of the payment.  You must state whether these amounts have been remitted to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) or committed for payment to the ATO.
    • If GST is not paid to you, do not complete Part A.
  • Part B seeks information about the funding received and expenditure and commitments, exclusive of any GST.  Do not include the GST component of any expenditure in this part.
Certification

Complete this certification after you have completed the Financial Acquittal for any ISP funding which you have received in 2014 and after you have entered all relevant information in the Assets Register.

ISP FUNDING RECIPIENT'S CERTIFICATION

I, Prof Annabelle Duncan, Vice-Chancellor & CEO certify that:

  1. the details shown in this financial acquittal form and the accompanying pages  - including the details of assets acquired and disposed of - represent a complete, true and correct summary of transactions that took place during the funding year under the Indigenous Education Program (ISP);
  2. Funds were spent on activities and initiatives to achieve the outcomes/targets indicated in the Higher Education Support Act 2003;
  3. any interest earned or royalties/income derived from these Funds was expended on activities to advance the objects of the Higher Education Support Act 2003; and

I understand that:

  1. in the event that I have not remitted GST paid under the Agreement to the Australian Taxation Office, that it is my obligation to remit those amounts, as required under the A New Tax System (Goods and Services Tax) Act 1999; and
  2. it is an offence under the Criminal Code Act 1995 to provide false or misleading information.

Signed by Prof Annabelle Duncan on  25.05.2015

Privacy Notice

The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C) collects your personal information (including your name, organisation and contact details) for the purposes of administering Indigenous Education Programmes.  PM&C will not otherwise use or disclose your personal information without your consent unless required or authorised by or under law.

Attachment 1 - Indigenous Support Program

Provider Name: University of New England

For the 2014 funding year (1 January - 31 December 2014)

PART A – If applicable, Goods and Services Tax (GST) paid under the Agreement:

Condition Amount
1. If applicable, GST received by you in 2014 as part of the Indigenous Support Programme funding under the Higher Education Support Act 2003. This amount is stated on your Recipient Created Tax Invoices (RCTIs). N/A
2. If applicable, GST remitted or committed for payment to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) (in the remittance instalments shown below) N/A

Amount remitted: $  N/A  

Date remitted:         /       /

PART B - Acquittal Summary Details (excluding GST):

INCOME AMOUNT

1. Unexpended Indigenous Support Programme funds from 2013 which were committed for expenditure prior to 31/12/2013.

$
2. Unexpended and uncommitted Indigenous Support Programme funds from 2013 which were approved for expenditure in 2014.

$265,729

3. Indigenous Support Programme funds provided in 2014.  These amounts appear on Recipient Created Tax Invoices (RCTIs) or Payment Advice Letters. $1,219,000
4. Interest, royalties and other income derived from Indigenous Support Programme funds in 2014. $182
  
5. Total Indigenous Support Programme funds to be acquitted in 2014. $1,484,911
EXPENDITURE AMOUNT
6.  Total Indigenous Support Programme expenditure in 2014,excluding any GST. $1,321,968
7. Unexpended Indigenous Support Programme funds which were committed for expenditure prior to 31/12/2014. $162,943
8. Requested carryover into 2014 of unexpended Indigenous Support Programme funds which were not committed for expenditure by 31/12/2014 – written approval date     /…/2014. [1] $
  
9. Total Indigenous Support Programme funds which by 31/12/2014 were fully expended and/or committed for expenditure. $1,484,911
  

10.  Returns of 2014 Indigenous Support Program Funds by 31/12/2014.

$
11. Returns of 2014 Indigenous Support Program Funds by 31/12/2014. $0
  
12.  Balance of provider’s Indigenous Support Programme bank account or cost centre as at 31/12/2014.$0

[1]  The Department will only approve the rollover of unspent funds in exceptional circumstances.

Section 7 - Breakdown of ISP Expenditure (excluding GST)
The Centre's salary expenditure

        Salaries

Amount

The Centre's salaries account for 15 full, part-time and casual positions covering an FTE of 9.28 and an average salary plus on-costs of $124,493

 

Total Salaries

$1,154,911

The Centre's non-salary operating costs 

Non-salary Operating costs – Itemised

Amount

Catering Consumables

$                       429

Catering Services

$                       595

Cleaning Materials

$                         59

Computer Services

$                       143

Facilities Repairs & Maintenance

$                         86

Fuel Purchases

$                    2,886

Hire Charges

$                    2,314

Marketing

$                       227

Membership Subs

$                    2,365

Minor Consumables

$                    3,504

Minor Equipment

$                       188

Motor Vehicles

$                    8,260

Parking fees

$                       327

Photocopying

$                    3,705

Postages

$                       429

Stationery

$                    4,096

Telephone Calls

$                    8,468

UNE Internet Charges

$                    2,492

  

       All Operating Costs

$                  40,573

  

Less costs allocated to teaching program

($                13,268)

  

       ISP Operating Costs

$                  27,305

The Centre's non-salary Program costs 

Non-salary Program costs - Itemised

Amount

Advertising & Promotional costs

 $                 10,870

Promotional Materials

 $                 23,428

Building repairs & Maintenance

 $                      979

Minor Equipment 

 $                 13,962

Other Student Activities

$                13,226

Research Costs

$                12,810

Professional Development

$                  4,063

University Engagement Events

$                27,457

Student Engagement Activities includes Access, Retention & Recruitment                      

$                30,265

Teaching

$                  2,692

Office & Student Foyer Refurbishment’s as per 2013 c/f approval – 2014 commitment’s

$              162,943

  

Total 2014 ISP Program Expenditure

$           1,484,911

Optional Information – Breakdown of Non-ISP expenditure to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

Expenditure

Amount

 

$

 

$

 

$

Total of 2014 Non-ISP expenditure

$