Adjunct Professor Michael Allen Fox

Adjunct Professor , Philosophy - School of Humanities

Michael Allen Fox

Biography

From 1966-2005, Michael taught undergraduate and postgraduate courses in 19th-century European philosophy, existentialism, environmental philosophy and other subjects at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.  He also edited Queen’s Quarterly, Canada’s oldest general interest intellectual review for ten years.  Michael has had a long association with Australia, having been a Funded Visiting Fellow, teaching at the Australian National University (1987); Visiting Fellow at ANU (1995-96); James Martineau Memorial Lecturer at the University of Tasmania (1996); and Adjunct Professor at UNE since 2004.  He retired to Australia in 2005 and now lives in Brisbane, where he continues his research and writing.

An eclectic approach and dedication to reaching a broader audience beyond academic circles are characteristic of Michael’s work.  He has delivered papers and talks on a wide variety of topics in Canada, the United States, Russia, Australia, and Taiwan.

Qualifications

BA (Hons), Cornell University; MA and PhD, University of Toronto

Research Interests

19th-century European philosophy, existentialism, environmental philosophy, ethics and animals, philosophy of vegetarianism, philosophy of peace, metaphysics.

Publications

Books

Home: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2016)

Understanding Peace: A Comprehensive Introduction (Routledge, 2014)

The Remarkable Existentialists (Humanity/Prometheus, 2009)

The Accessible Hegel (Humanity/Prometheus, 2005)

Deep Vegetarianism (Temple University Press, 1999)

The Case for Animal Experimentation: An Evolutionary and Ethical Perspective (University of California Press, 1986)

Selected recent articles/book chapters

“A New Look at Personal Identity,” Philosophy Now Bookazine #2: Metaphysics (2018); in press.

“The Ideology of Meat-Eating,” Harvard Review of Philosophy 25 (2018); in press.

“Nonviolence and Pacifism in the Long 19th Century,” Routledge Handbook of Pacifism and Nonviolence, ed. Andrew Fiala (New York: Routledge, 2018), pp. 15-29.

“Rethinking the Value of Water: Stewardship, Sustainability, and a Better Future,” Water Policy, Imagination and Innovation: Interdisciplinary Approaches, ed. Robyn Bartel, Louise Noble, Jacqueline Williams and Stephen Harris (London: Routledge, 2018), pp. 113-126.

“Reflections on Violence,” The Peace of Nature and the Nature of Peace: Essays on Ecology, Nature, Nonviolence, and Peace, ed. Andrew Fiala (Philosophy of Peace Series, Value Inquiry Book Series 282) (Leiden and Boston: Brill Rodopi, 2015), pp. 31-40.

“Vegetarianism and Veganism,” International Encyclopedia of Ethics, ed. Hugh LaFollette  (Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013), vol. 9, pp. 5310-5316.

“Childhood and the Environment in The Little Prince” (co-authored with Elizabeth Hale), Dalhousie Review 93 (2013): 289-303.

“Relating to Animals in Space and Time: An Exercise in Moral Imagination,” Strangers to Nature: Animal Lives and Human Ethics,ed. Gregory Zucker (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2012), pp. 201-212.

Book in progress

Fate: A Strange but Revealing Idea