Bachelor of Science with Honours - Handbook

© University of New England 2017
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Table of Contents

Files for download

Introduction

The Honours year provides an opportunity for well-qualified graduates to undertake a fourth year of study with a major component involving a research project in one of a suite of disciplines offered by the university. Students are able to develop their own individual research project and conduct either empirical or theoretical research under the guidance of a supervisor.  Completion of the Bachelor of Science with Honours provides an avenue into postgraduate study or into a career as a professional researcher or academic. Honours graduates are able to demonstrate to potential employers that they have the ability to produce high quality work with minimal supervision.

The Bachelor of Science with Honours is offered by The School of Science and Technology with the following Schools providing honours in the majors/disciplines indicated:

School of Science and Technology: Biochemistry, Chemistry, Computational Science, Genetics, Mathematics, Microbiology, Physics, Physiology.

School of Environmental and Rural Science: Agronomy, Animal Science, Botany, Ecology, Environmental Science, Genetics, Geoscience, Physiology, Zoology.

School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences: Geography, Psychology.

School of Humanities: Archaeology.

This handbook and process described herein is relevant to all Honours with majors/disciplines described above.

Honours can be studied internally or externally, and in full time or part time modes. A start can be made in Trimester 1, 2 or 3 each year. For students commencing in Trimester 1, the schedule for full-time candidates is a start date at the beginning of T1 and a completion/submission date 39 weeks later. For T2 commencement or T3 commencement, the timeline is extended to 41 weeks to take into account the university closure over the Christmas/New Year break. For part-time candidature, which generally includes students studying in external mode, candidates have additional time from the commencement date with appropriate deadlines for assignments. See the table below for commencement and completion dates for 2017 enrolment.

Important Dates

 

Full time

Part time

 

Commence

Submission

Commence

Submission

T1 commencement (39 weeks)

5th March 2018

30th November 2018

5th March 2018

August 2019

T2 commencement (41 weeks including 2 week Christmas break)

9th July 2018

18th April 2019

9th July 2018

December 2010

T3 commencement (41 weeks including 2 week Christmas break)

5th November 2018

16th August 2019

5th November 2018

April 2020

Important Contacts

Head, School of Science and Technology

Professor Aron Murphy

Email:  hos-st@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 3118

Course Coordinator,  Bachelor of Science with Honours
(School Science and Technology, School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences, School of Humanities)

Dr Heather Nonhebel

Email:  hnonheb2@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 2083

Course Coordinator,  Bachelor of Science with Honours
(School Environmental and Rural Science)

Dr Susan Wilson

Email:  swilso24@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 2789

Academic Manager, School of Science and Technology

Mrs Chris Sisson

Email:  csisson@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 4209

Major/Discipline Contacts:

Major/Discipline

Contact

Contact Details

Animal Science

Dr Sam Clark

Email:  sam.clark@une.edu.au
Phone:  02 6773 3328

Agronomy

A/Professor Chris Guppy

Email:   cguppy@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 3567

Archaeology

A/Professor Peter Grave

Email:  pgrave@une.edu.au
Phone:  02 6773 2062

Biochemistry

Dr Heather Nonhebel

Email: hnonhebe@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 2083

Botany

Professor Jeremy Bruhl

Email: jbruhl@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 2429

Chemistry

A/Professor Chris Fellows

Email:  cfellows@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 2470

Computational Science

Dr Peter Loxley

Email: ploxley@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 2307

Ecology

Professor Caroline Gross

Email: cgross@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 3759

Environmental Science

Dr Lisa Lobry de Bruyn

Email: llobryde@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 3119

Genetics

Dr Heather Nonhebel

email: hnonheb2@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 2083

Geography

Dr Raj Rajaratnam

Email:  rrajarat@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 3435

Geoscience

Dr Luke Milan

Email: lmilan@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 2019

Mathematics

Dr Adam Harris

Email: adamh@turing.une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 2210

Microbiology

Dr Heather Nonhebel

Email: hnonheb2@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 2083

Physics

Professor David Lamb

Email: dlamb@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 3565

Physiology

Dr Heather Nonhebel

Email: hnonheb2@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 2083

Psychology

Dr Suzie Cosh

Email:  scosh@une.edu.au
Phone: 02 6773 2073

Zoology

Dr Stuart Cairns

Email:  scairns@une.edu.au
Phone:  02 6773 2170

Course coordinators are responsible for issues with enrolment and progression, and issues related to supervision, resources, and thesis submission and examination.

Major/Discipline contacts can also assist with supervision arrangements and tracking progression. Students experiencing personal problems with their supervisors may discuss matters with the Honours Course Coordinator or the discipline contact, but the actual content and research undertaken is the responsibility of the student in consultation with the supervisor.

Enrolling in Honours

1. Interested students are asked to refer to the course rules for the Bachelor of Science with Honours regarding admission to candidature and course requirements (see Courses and Units Catalogue). To be considered for admission students must have completed a Bachelor of Science or an equivalent Bachelor qualification in a relevant discipline and have achieved a GPA of 5.5 or better in the undergraduate degree; or a credit average in at least 24 credit points at 300-level in Science units from an area related to the Major/Discipline area.

2. Select a supervisor and decide on a research topic. The best plan is to approach a potential supervisor in a field relevant to your topic and discuss together a suitable research project. Of course, you may take your own ideas to a potential supervisor for discussion. Supervisors and research projects are best organised at least 2 months before the Honours year is due to begin. You can also contact the course coordinators or the discipline contacts listed above for additional help with this.

Projects are supervised by academic staff within the relevant School. For staff and their interests see lists of staff for the following Schools:

3. Information on the on-line application process for Bachelor Honours with Thesis Proposal Form and additional requirements is available on the admission page.

Students, with input from their proposed supervisor, are required to first complete the Thesis Proposal Form. Students are required to provide details of their proposed supervisor(s) and their proposed research area on the Thesis Proposal Form.  Applications will not be processed if the Thesis Proposal Form has not been completed fully and attached to the on-line admission application. This form indicates that your proposed supervisor(s) agree(s) to supervise the project, has the facilities and resources to support your work, and that alternative supervisory arrangements are in place if the supervisor plans to be absent for part of your project.

4. Finally, to formally enrol in the degree, complete the Bachelor of Science (Honours) Online Admission Application. Don’t forget to attach the completed Thesis Proposal Form and a copy of your academic transcript. The application, together with the Thesis Proposal Form, will be forwarded to the School of Science and Technology (regardless of the area in which study is to be completed).  The School of Science and Technology will seek advice on the application from the relevant Discipline and Honours Course Coordinator and will advise the Student Administration and Services (SAS) of the outcome of the application.

All applications for admission to candidature for the

Bachelor of Science with Honours

MUST be approved by the

Bachelor of Science with Honours Course Coordinator.

When an application has been processed and the student has been accepted as a candidate for the degree, SAS will send an offer of enrolment.  Students accept this AND then at the same time enrol into the honours unit SCI400 assigning their relevant Major/discipline.    (NB: Students completing Honours in Psychology, are required to enrol in the Psychology Major and 24 credit points of course work plus a 24 credit point thesis unit)  Information on SCI400 can be found in the Course and Unit Catalogue. Students will then be enrolled in the Honours Moodle site.

For part-time students, and this generally includes off-campus students, students have four trimesters from the commencement date with appropriate deadlines for thesis submission.  Students will be required to enrol twice, for example, YLH1 (Year 1) and YLH1 (Year 2).

Requirements of the Honours Year

The primary requirement is to perform well in conducting the research project and writing the thesis. You are also required to complete satisfactorily other items of written work and a research seminar. There is also an opportunity to prepare a non-assessable introductory seminar, which will help you to plan your experimental work and receive feedback.

The structure of the Honours year is slightly different for students in different disciplinary areas.  Students should refer to their relevant Major/Discipline requirements. Regardless of the Major/Discipline chosen for Honours, the Honours year is quite different from undergraduate studies.  The Honours year, particularly with respect to the research project, is less structured and the student is responsible for time-management (for example, developing a timetable for completion of the thesis). Students are also responsible for maintaining contact throughout the year with their supervisor and the School Office, as various matters arise with respect to changes in circumstances, seminar schedules, time-off for medical reasons, etc.  The most efficient means of contact is via email, and it is essential that students check their UNE email account regularly. Students will also be enrolled into the Honours Moodle Site where all Honours notifications will be posted.

A significant part of the learning process is via informal contacts with fellow graduates and with academic staff other than the immediate supervisor.  Students are encouraged to participate in the various activities organised by their Discipline or School whether it be going to morning and afternoon tea in the appropriate common rooms, where the relaxed atmosphere is conducive to informal discussions, or to more formal academic activities.  It is an expectation and most important that Honours students attend the School/Discipline seminars (not just those in areas relevant to your Honours project).  The Honours course co-cordinator and supervisor will advise on seminars that students have to attend. Ensure that you check posted schedules on Moodle and email advice for accurate details.

On-campus Requirements for Off-campus Students

It is a requirement that ALL students attend UNE to present their final seminar.

There is also a requirement for external students to be on campus for a certain period in each semester, although this will depend on the research topic. As a guide, this would be at least the equal of an intensive school, i.e., 4 days per semester. Experience has shown that the success of the project is positively correlated with the amount of contact between the supervisor and student. The frequency and timing of visits will depend on the nature of the project. Students must discuss the on-campus requirements with their supervisor(s).

Assessment

The assessment for Honours incorporates a research thesis that represents the main body of your work, and additional components as determined for each major/discipline. These can include a seminar, literature review or research paper. A summary of the assessment requirements is provided in the table on p15.  This information is also available in the Course and Unit Catalogue.

Submission of the research thesis will be 39 weeks from the commencement of the trimester in which a candidate was enrolled for full time students and pro-rata equivalent for part-time students.

Seminars

Students should consult their supervisor and the Honours course co-ordinator for definitive information on seminar requirements for their Discipline. Not all Disciplines require their Honours students to present a seminar but for those Disciplines where a seminar is required, the following information is provided as a general example.

An introductory seminar may be required and is presented early in the project and will consist of a Powerpoint outline of the background, aims and methodology of the proposed research project. The aim of these initial seminars is to ensure research progress and engender comments from staff (other than your supervisor) and other students with time to consider comments before data collection commences.

The final seminar is assessed and is presented towards the end of the project. The presentation should consist of a PowerPoint brief outline of the Background, Aims and Methods, and present the Results and Conclusions from the research project. This will be typically 15 minutes with then five minutes for questions, but specific discipline requirements will be provided on the Honours Moodle Site. The supervisor is expected to have input in one trial presentation but the final presentation is the responsibility of the student. As a guide for students an assessment form for the final seminar is provided in Appendix 3.  It is a requirement that ALL students attend on campus to present their final seminar.

Viva Voce (Oral Examination)

Some Disciplines require students to complete a viva voce in defence of their thesis.

Where a viva voce is required it is commonly scheduled at the same time as the final seminar or shortly after submission of the thesis.  Each student will take part in the oral discussion with a panel, chaired by the Honours Coordinator, and consisting of at least three academics, one of whom shall be the supervisor.  Other academic staff may be present and participate in the oral discussion, if approved by the supervisor and Honours Coordinator.

Students should consult their supervisor for details of specific requirements.

Honours Assessment Summary

For candidates with a Major in Agronomy, Animal Science, Archaeology, Biochemistry, Botany, Chemistry, Computational Science, Ecology, Environmental Science, Genetics, Geography, Geoscience, Mathematics, Physics, Physiology, Zoology

cps

Assessment and Weight

SCI400

48

For candidates with a Major other than Mathematics

Assessment 1: (Weight: 30%)

This may be in the form of a literature review/coursework units/seminar/reading, as directed by discipline and supervisor.

Assessment 2: (Weight: 70%)

A research project requiring the submission of a thesis – a viva voce examination, as directed by the discipline and supervisor, may be required after submission of the thesis.  The outcome of the viva voce may be used in determining the final Honours grade.

Only for candidates with a Major in Mathematics

Assessment 1: (Weight: 70%)

This will comprise advanced-level coursework units to be determined in consultation with the candidate’s supervisor.

Assessment 2: (Weight: 30%)

A research project requiring the submission of a thesis – a viva voce examination, as directed by the discipline and supervisor, may be required after submission of the thesis.  The outcome of the viva voce may be used in determining the final Honours grade.

Candidates with a Major in Agronomy, Animal Science, Botany, Ecology, Environmental Science, Genetics, Geoscience, Zoology will be required to give a final seminar weighted at 10% of the final honours grade. The research project is weighted 70%. The remaining 20% assessment will be determined by discipline and supervisor.

For candidates with a Major in Psychology

cps

Assessment and Weight

  Assessment information for the following units will be available on the Course and Unit Catalogue prior to the commencement of teaching.

PSYC421

PSYC422

PSYC423

PSYC424

6

6

6

6

Professional Practice 1 (Trimester 1)

Advanced Research Skills (Trimester 1)

Professional Practice 2 (Trimester 2)

Advanced Topics in Psychology (Trimester 2)

PSYC402H

24

Literature Review (Weight: 25%)

Research Proposal (Weight: 0%)

Research proposal is assessed as satisfied/not satisfied requirements.

Thesis (Weight: 75%)

The Research Thesis is to be submitted in the form of a research report in journal article format.

It is mandatory to pass all assessment tasks in order to pass this unit

PSYC403H

24

Literature Review (Weight: 25%)

Research Proposal (Weight: 0%)

Research proposal is assessed as satisfied/not satisfied requirements.

Thesis (Weight: 75%)

The Research Thesis is to be submitted in the form of a research report in journal article format.

It is mandatory to pass all assessment tasks in order to pass this unit

The Research Project/Thesis

The aim of the research project is to introduce the student to original scientific work.  The student, in conjunction with their supervisor, should develop a realistic research project and plan, given the restraints of time, funding and availability of infrastructure.   It is important that individuals develop the habit of keeping up-to-date with the relevant scientific papers and related published materials (reviews, textbooks etc). In addition to the resources of the Dixson Library, the Internet is a most important resource, with many journals/reviews available in full text. Your supervisor, colleagues and relevant School Librarian can advise as to the availability of on-line journals, related materials and your document delivery entitlement.

Students are expected to use a reference management program such as Endnote for referencing.  Endnote is a personal reference database program.  The main functions of such programs are to:

  • maintain a personal library of references
  • download references from journal databases and Google Scholar
  • insert references into word-processed documents
  • generate a bibliography in the correct style for publication

Information on Endnote can be found on the library web pages.

Honours students can obtain Endnote through the UNE IT Service Desk on the Ground Floor of Dixson Library.  Email the IT Service Desk for further information.

The thesis must be produced by a suitable word processing software package and care taken in the presentation and grammar. Your supervisor is expected to comment on the first draft and sufficient time (at least three weeks before the due date of thesis submission) should be given for appropriate feedback from the supervisor.  Remember that a first draft, particularly the Results and Discussion, should be in such a form that the supervisor has all the necessary information to make constructive suggestions.

The final version of the research thesis is the individual’s responsibility. A pdf copy of the thesis must be submitted through the University’s e-submission system via the thesis submission portal on the SCI400 Moodle site before 4 pm on the thesis submission date. In addition the student must submit three softbound copies to the supervisor before 5pm. The supervisor may also request a word copy of the thesis.

The following is a suggested structure for your thesis but you should refer to the requirements of the relevant Discipline and you should also consult copies of previous Honours theses in the relevant Discipline for further guidance on the thesis layout.

Length

Length is generally a maximum of 20,000 words (or the applicable word limit for your Discipline), 50 to a maximum of 100 pages (including figures, tables and references).

Format

12 font – 1.5 spacing – normal margin setting (not less than 2cm)

Suggested Structure

Title page

Signed declaration by student (example provided in Appendix 1)

Table of Contents

List of Figures and Tables

Summary/Abstract, (1 page A4 page maximum)

Introduction

Literature Review

Methods

Results, including relevant figures, tables and graphs

Discussion and Conclusions

List of References/Bibliography (style APA or as directed by supervisor)

Appendices (e.g. supplementary data not included in the Results)

Students are strongly advised to ensure on-time submission of their thesis.

School Policy on Late Submissions will be enforced.

It is also permissible to produce a thesis with self-contained data chapters (i.e. each containing an introduction, methods, results, discussion similar in format of a peer reviewed journal publication) together with a general thesis introduction and literature review and a unifying conclusion or synthesis.

Thesis Examination and Other Assessment Marking

The thesis will be examined by at least two examiners with expertise in the area of study neither of whom will be the candidate's supervisor. One of the examiners should be external to the University of New England.

In case of dispute, the supervisor and Honours Course Coordinator, generally in consultation with appropriate academic staff, will determine the appointment of the examiners. Examiners will be required to submit a written report along with a completed 'Examiners Assessment Form'. If marks vary by more than 10% for the thesis, then a third examiner may be appointed. In all matters relating to examiners, the Head of School shall have the final decision.

The following are examples of areas of importance when grading Honours theses and serve as assessment criteria – consult your supervisor for advice on any specific discipline requirements in terms of assessment criteria:

1. Subject Content

  • adequacy of candidate’s understanding of concepts
  • level of scientific rigour gauged from description of approach
  • thorough, critical review of previous research and key papers
  • clear statement of why research was undertaken, put in context
  • clear statement of hypotheses

2. Competence in research

  • level of scientific rigour gauged from description of approach
  • methods of survey and experimental design
  • analysis of results
  • interpretation and discussion of results
  • adequacy of discussion of project limitations and contribution to the field

3. Presentation

  • organisation and presentation of the work
  • clarity of writing style
  • referencing and graphics

Two internal markers assess other written work and can include the supervisor(s).

Assessment of the final Honours seminar is based on marks awarded by academics in the audience.

Honours Grades

The grades Honours are:

  • ≥85%          H1     Honours Class I
  • 75 to 84%   H2A   Honours Class II, Division 1
  • 65 to 74%   H2B   Honours Class II, Division 2
  • 50 to 64%   H3     Honours Class III
  • <50%          Fail

Honours Class I (H1) – equivalent to a High Distinction, 7 on the GPA scale

Excellent performance indicating complete and comprehensive understanding and/or application of the subject matter; achieves all basic and higher order intended unit objectives and graduate attributes linked to the assessment tasks; minimal or no errors of fact, omission and/or application present; clear and unambiguous evidence of possession of a very high level of required skills; demonstrated very high level of interpretive and/or analytical ability and intellectual initiative; very high level of competence. (Numerical conversion: scores and/or aggregate marks of 85% or above.)

A First Class Honours degree demonstrates that the student has excellent potential for independent research and would be strongly supported in an application for a higher degree and for a scholarship application. A first-class thesis would be free of major faults, demonstrate originality and skills in planning, analysis and execution of a logical research plan, and would be written clearly and succinctly.  It would also illustrate the scientific and/or applied relevance of the project work.

Honours Class II, Division 1 (H2A) – equivalent to a Distinction, 6 on the GPA scale

Very good performance indicating reasonably complete and comprehensive understanding and/or application of the subject matter; achieves all basic and most higher-order unit objectives and graduate attributes linked to the assessment tasks; some minor flaws; clear and unambiguous evidence of possession of a high level of required skills; demonstrated high level of interpretive and/or analytical ability and intellectual initiative; high level of competence. (Numerical conversion: scores and/or aggregate marks between 75% and 84%.)

This identifies a very competent student who has potential to proceed to a higher degree but would need appreciable guidance to meet the required standards.  A H2A thesis would exhibit a thorough understanding of the research issue and a professional or original approach to its resolution.  Research design and analyses would be good, presentation clear, and errors of fact and style minimal.

Honours Class II, Division 2 (H2B) – equivalent to a Credit, 5 on the GPA scale

Good performance indicating reasonable and well-rounded understanding and/or application of the subject matter; achieves all basic but only a few higher-order intended unit objectives and graduate attributes linked to the tasks; a few more serious flaws or several minor ones; clear and unambiguous evidence of possession of a reasonable level of most required skills; demonstrated reasonable level of interpretive and/or analytical ability and intellectual initiative; reasonable level of competence. (Numerical conversion: scores and/or aggregate marks between 65% and 74%.)

This implies the student is capable of proceeding to a Master by research degree but would need considerable further development before commencing a PhD. Such a thesis is competently written but contains some inadequacies in scope, content, presentation, data analysis or understanding of the topic.

Honours Class III (H3) – equivalent to a Pass, 4 on the GPA scale

Satisfactory performance indicating adequate but incomplete or less well- rounded understanding and/or application of the subject matter; achieves many basic but very few or none of the higher-order intended unit objectives and graduate attributes linked to the assessment tasks; several serious flaws or many minor ones; clear and unambiguous evidence of possession of an adequate level of an acceptable number of required skills; demonstrated adequate level of interpretive and/or analytical ability and intellectual initiative; adequate level of competence. (Numerical conversion: scores and/or aggregate marks between 50% to 64%.)

A student awarded this grade would not be encouraged to seek a higher degree.  Thesis work may indicate much effort but suffer inadequacies in scope, content, presentation, data analysis or understanding of the topic.

If the overall mark is <50%, the student has failed the degree and the thesis contains serious inadequacies in some or all areas.

Deadlines

Early in the Honours year, the supervisor in conjunction with the Honours Coordinator will discuss the expectations and requirements with the student and develop a research assessment plan – a program of assessable tasks, their deadlines and their percentage of the final assessment.

Extensions of time for thesis submission will be granted only because of circumstances beyond the student’s control (e.g., medical problems evidenced by production of a medical certificate, equipment failures, disasters in the field). Due dates for the thesis are outlined at the beginning of this document. Due dates for other assessment items are to be negotiated with the supervisor.

Penalties for late submission will follow the UNE policy as per undergraduate units. Requests for extensions must be made to the supervisor and copied to the Honours course co-ordinator in writing before the relevant deadline. Failure to hand in any of the assignments will result in the Honours degree being classified as a “Failed Incomplete”. Students seeking additional time for submission may also seek a Special Extension of Time through the Student Centre.

Special Extensions of Time

Requests for special extensions of time have to be made in writing, with supporting documentation (e.g. medical certificate) as per the University Special Assessment policy.

Responsibilities of the Student

It is the student’s responsibility to confirm a research project and a willing supervisor prior to enrolment in the degree.  The student is then expected to develop the project from an idea or an outline discussed with the supervisor. The supervisor will ask the student to write a research plan and develop a timetable for the work. Regular communication between the student and supervisor about the progress of the research is essential. Although the student is responsible for the day-to-day running of their project, the experience of the supervisor is invaluable when deciding on study sites, methods and appropriate analyses of results. It is the student’s responsibility to regularly consult with their supervisor and organise suitable times for meetings.

Students are also responsible for administration of the project and the program of study. For example, the student must ensure that all work is handed in by the due deadline, and that drafts of the thesis are submitted to the supervisor allowing adequate time for comment.

Similarly, if the research project requires a student to undertake any travel for fieldwork, it is the student’s responsibility, in consultation with the supervisor, to ensure that all paperwork (SmartBook/4.13a, b, c, d, e/Approval to use UNE vehicles) required is completed in due time before such fieldwork is undertaken.

The student is also responsible, in consultation with the supervisor, for ensuring relevant ethics approval and permits are obtained where necessary before work commences.

Students should not be reticent about organising meetings to discuss their work, concerns, or future plans with the supervisor.

As previously mentioned, there is a requirement for off-campus students to attend on campus for a certain period in each trimester.  Experience has shown that the success of the project is positively correlated with the amount of contact between the supervisor and student. The frequency and timing of visits will depend on the nature of the project and the Discipline in which study is being completed.  Students should consult with their supervisor to organise appropriate dates for on-campus attendance.

Responsibilities of the Supervisor

The supervisor will ensure that the project has sufficient scope for Honours and will provide guidance on research approaches. He/she will advise on methods and field sites and ensure that the student knows how to use equipment properly and safely. The supervisor will ensure that the student is aware of correct procedures in the particular discipline area.

The supervisor will endeavour to ensure that the student maintains satisfactory progress on the research and will usually suggest that the student provides a timetable or research plan to assist this progress. Progress reports and drafts should be read and annotated as rapidly as possible. Importantly, the supervisor will consult with the student early in the Honours year to produce a program of assessable tasks, their deadlines and their percentage of the final assessment.  An example is provided here:

Student: ………………………………….………..……..……………………………….

Supervisor: ..…………………..………………………………………………………….

Assignment       Provisional Title                                                          Weighting             Deadline

Thesis                   “Wetland plant dynamics”                                                70% 30 October

Essay 1                 “Reproductive strategies in wetland plants”             10% 15 April

Essay 2                 “Impacts of drought on plant recruitment”               10% 15 August

Final Seminar     “A year in the mud” 10%                 25 October

In addition, supervisors need to ensure that alternative supervisory arrangements are in place should they decide to be absent for part of the student’s project.

The supervisor is responsible for nominating examiners for the thesis and advising the Honours Coordinator at least four to six weeks before the thesis is due for submission.  The supervisor cannot act as an examiner but may discuss the nomination of examiners with the student.  The student must not be advised of who is finally nominated as examiners.

The supervisor will organise marking of the other assessment tasks, including seminars. Marks for the various assessment tasks should be recorded and collated by the supervisor and forwarded to the Honours course coordinator and Honours administrative assistant at the earliest opportunity for ratification by the relevant Teaching and Learning Committee.

Responsibilities of the Honours Coordinator

To ensure timely grading of the thesis, the Honours Coordinator (in consultation with the supervisor) will organise the appointment of the thesis examiners several weeks before the thesis submission date. The Honours Coordinator will ensure all marks for the various assessment tasks are recorded for ratification by the relevant Teaching and Learning Committee.

Additional Information

Written Assignments (other than thesis)

All written work should be on A4 paper, Times New Roman, 1.5 spaced with 12-point fonts. All written work must be submitted through the University’s e-submission system via the assignment submission portal on the SCI400 Moodle site. Appropriate feedback and an allocated mark will be provided to the student. (For thesis requirements see p17-18)

Plagiarism

Plagiarism in any work handed in for assessment will be managed under the rules and policies of the University. Ensure you acknowledge all sources and assistance with any work completed. If in doubt, visit the plagiarism information page for further details.

Induction

Schools run Induction Days for their Higher Degree Research (HDR) students.  Depending on the nature of the project, supervisors may ask Honours students to attend the relevant HDR Induction Days run by the Schools. These days provide general advice about University and School procedures such as fieldwork safety procedures, University vehicles, library services etc.  All on-campus students are encouraged to attend regardless of their project. In addition there will be a series of additional training opportunities for Honours students throughout their program which will be announced on the Honours Moodle Site.

Equipment, Travel, University Vehicles

Detailed information relevant to particular areas is available in the relevant Discipline requirements.

Students must consult their supervisor(s) in all matters relating to the use of equipment, travel and University vehicles if required for completion of their project.

Appropriate travel forms (SmartBook) and Fieldwork Safety forms (4.13a,b,c,d,e) need to be completed for any field trips. Forms need to be signed by you and your supervisor before submission to the School Resource Office. Travel should not be undertaken unless these forms have been completed and lodged with the relevant School Office.

If funding allows, University vehicles may be used for research, and your supervisor should be consulted for full details. Use of 4WD vehicles requires the user to pass the relevant driving test. Please refer to the University Travel Policy that is available on the following UNE website. Please find form and information at http://www.une.edu.au/financial-services/financial-services-directorate/business-units/vehicle-pool/

Ethics

Students whose project involves animal or humans must be aware of the University’s guidelines and policies in relation to human and animal ethics.

Standard operating procedures and other relevant issues in relation to animal ethics can be found on the Animal Research Ethics page.

Information in relation to human ethics can be found on the Human Research Ethics page.

Students must consult their supervisor(s) in any proposed use of humans and/or animals for research purposes

Financial Support for Honours Students

Some Schools provide financial support for Honours students.  Students should consult their supervisor and the Honours course coordinator about financial support. The School Resource Office manages the grant, and the student and supervisor decide on how the funds are to be used. Your supervisor will advise as to the correct procedures for the purchase of necessary items. Access to photocopying facilities will be made available via an individual access code. The cost of preparation of the thesis is the responsibility of the student, but note that computer facilities are available in the School.

Office space and computing resources will be made available where possible by the supervisor.

Occasionally, Honours scholarships or additional funding may be available for specific projects. Supervisors also may know where additional funds may be sought, and applying for such funds is a valuable experience for Honours students.

Library services

For information on what the Dixson Library at UNE may be able to assist with in the course of your Honours year, please see their web page.

Books, journals, completed theses, etc. may be borrowed from the School libraries. Students should consult their School Office.

Where essential journal articles are not available via the UNE library Honours students are eligible for a limited number of Interlibrary document requests. Please see the link for further information and access to request form http://www.une.edu.au/library/borrowing/interlibrary-loans

Lodgment of Plant and Animal Vouchers

Depending on the research being undertaken, it may be necessary for the student to lodge plant and animal vouchers arising from their Honours work. The vouchers must be correctly prepared and accompanied by appropriate collecting information.

In the case of plant vouchers (even for a primarily non-botanical study), students and supervisors should discuss this aspect of the project with the Director of the N.C.W. Beadle Herbarium (NE). Students will generally be provided with necessary equipment and materials and guides to facilitate collection and preparation of useful and appropriate vouchers to maximise outcomes. Access to the NE database of the herbarium collection can also be provided to students for planning fieldwork or for other purposes. If a permit is needed only to collect voucher specimens in NSW, then the Director may be able to endorse you on his N.C.W. Beadle Herbarium permit. Contact: Prof. Jeremy Bruhl.

Students must consult their supervisor(s) in all matters relating to the lodgement of plant and animal vouchers very early in the project.

Permits and Permissions

Some projects may involve the collection of material from, or working in, National Parks and State Forests.  This type of work usually requires a permit. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that where permits are required these are arranged as soon as possible with the assistance of the supervisor.

Permission to work on private property must also be obtained in writing. Ensure that the supervisor is aware of all such arrangements and retains a photocopy of all permit applications, permits granted and written permission.

Students must consult their supervisor(s) beforehand in relation to any permits or permissions required.

Safety and Security

All buildings have Safety Officers and have first aid kits, fire extinguishers, designated meeting points for evacuations of buildings, etc.  All buildings have good signage in relation to safety issues.  Students should become familiar with the various facilities in their building(s).

Each School/Discipline has guidelines on providing access to buildings after hours and at weekends.  Students should consult their supervisor(s) in the first instance.

All accidents must be reported immediately. Students undertaking fieldwork can access first aid kits, EPIRBs, Satellite phones from the School Office, as well as 4WD recovery gear from the Motor Pool.

Honours students will often need access to buildings and laboratories at nights and weekends. If this is the case, students should ensure that “After hours Registers” are filled out correctly. Any suspicious activity after hours in buildings should be immediately reported to UNE Security on ext 2099. Notify the Administrative Assistant or Technical staff of any failures of essential services or faults. In the case of emergency requiring police, fire, or ambulance services, dial 0 for an outside line then 000.

Student Support

The University is committed to providing all students with a high quality learning experience.  Effective support services are available to assist you throughout the course of your studies. These services include information on academic, administrative, financial, IT, personal and resource needs. To access the information relating to these resources, go to the Student Support Team page, and follow the links.