Section 1: Achievement of national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Policy (AEP) Goals in 2016 and plans for future years

Please provide evidence of:

  • strategies you have implemented which seek to achieve the AEP goals and your assessment of whether these strategies are working;
  • constraints on your ability to achieve the AEP goals; and
  • plans for future improvement of existing strategies or implementation of new strategies to meet each of the AEP goals relevant to higher education.

The AEP goals (paraphrased) relating to higher education are to:

  1. Establish effective arrangements for the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in educational decision-making.
  2. Increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples employed, as academic and non-academic staff in higher education institutions.
  3. Ensure equitable access of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to higher education.
  4. Achieve the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in higher education, at rates commensurate with those of all other Australians.
  5. Enable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to attain the same graduation rates from award courses in higher education as for other Australians.
  6. To provide all Australian students with an understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander traditional and contemporary cultures.
AEP Goal 1: Participation in educational decision-making

1. Establish effective arrangements for the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in educational decision-making.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

  • The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people involved in School/Directorate governance and decision-making bodies and processes and the nature of their involvement,
    i.e. memberships on boards, committees etc.
  • If there is no Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander membership on key governance and decision-making bodies, please provide an explanation.
  • The roles and responsibilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders within your institution.

Encouraging and increasing Indigenous representation within governing and decision-making bodies, such as the University of New England (UNE) Council, Academic Board and other University Committees, as well as in management positions, is a core focus for UNE, as set out in the University’s Strategic Plan.

Participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on decision-making bodies and in decision-making processes as part of the institutional governance of the University was found within the following positions and representation in 2016 as set out below:

  • Lisa Shipley, an Indigenous lecturer in the School of Rural Medicine, is a member of the UNE Academic Board.
  • Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) is the University Ethics Committee includes the Oorala Director.
  • Directorship of the Oorala Aboriginal Centre
  • The role of Elder-in-Residence, Oorala
  • University Teaching and Learning Committee: Leader of Oorala Academic team
  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy Governance Committee: Oorala Indigenous Academic Advisor and UNE Aboriginal Employment Officer.
  • Council of Heads of School: Oorala Director
  • Enrolment Steering Committee: Oorala Student Services Manager
  • Student Administration & Services Forum: Oorala Student Services Manager.
  • An Indigenous scholars served on the Course Advisory Board for the Bachelor of Media and Communications and related courses that underwent a major review in November 2016. He has also advised on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander content in units in his area of expertise.
  • In the School of Health, the CEO of the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) is a member of the Bachelor of Nursing stakeholder group.
  • School of Education Teaching and Learning Committee: Senior Lecturer, Oorala
  • Library Advisory Committee: Oorala Lecturer
  • First-year Experience Committee: Oorala Lecturer
  • UNE’s WH&S Working Group, HR User Group and Finance User Group: Resource & Compliance Officer.
  • The University’s academic schools take advice from advisory committees, with both internal and external representation (depending upon purpose) at the School, discipline or course level. This is designed to ensure that perspectives and needs of key stakeholders are included. For example, the School of Health consults and reviews with its External Advisory Committees on the development of nursing and counselling curricula; the relevant Nursing Committee includes Indigenous representation from UNE and the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses (CATSIN).
  • School of Law Advisory Board includes the Director, Oorala Aboriginal Centre, as an ex-officio member.
  • The School of Law has an Aboriginal academic as a member of the School’s Teaching and Learning Committee.
  • The School of Education has Mr Steve Widders, an Anaiwan Elder, is Patron of the School of Education and is invited to significant occasions held in the School.
  • The Oorala Aboriginal Centre is represented on the School of Education Teaching & Learning Committee by Mr Guido Posthausen for the TRACKS Tertiary Preparation Program.
  • A local Aboriginal Clinical and Counselling Psychologist was invited to be a member of the Clinical Psychology Advising Liaison Committee that meets twice per year.

In 2016, Aboriginal representation on governance committees is limited to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy Governance Committee. There are a minimum of 3 Aboriginal staff members on this Committee.

In last 2016 UNE decided to establish an Indigenous Governance Working Party to examine best practice in the areas of education policy directed at Indigenous students, employment policy and in Indigenous governance. This working party will be chaired by the Oorala Director and will report to the UNE Executive in mid-2017.

Future plans

Discussions have begun with a senior consultant for Aboriginal Employment, Ms Pam Widders, on a training scheme to involve three Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in a possible TAFE articulated scheme where practicum work is undertaken in the Schools of Environmental and Rural Sciences and Science and Technology.

AEP Goal 2: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff numbers

2. Increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff employed as academic and non-academic staff in higher education institutions.

Your response to this goal needs to address, but is not limited to, the following points:

  • An outline of your current Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy including details on its current status, who has responsibility for its implementation, how is progress measured, how and when is progress reviewed or evaluated.
  • Information on your strategies for increasing numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff employed in your School/Directorate. (Please provide a link to your Employment statement).
  • The number of Indigenous-specific positions at your University, detailed by occupation and level.
  • The current number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff at your University and their roles across the University (including numbers in academic and non-academic roles, and by level).

Aboriginal Lecturer in the School of Rural Medicine, Ms Lisa Shipley, and Aboriginal Support Officer, Ms Shannon Smith, were appointed to develop and run the Kruki Summer School for Indigenous medical students. These short-term contract appointments were funded by a Higher Education Participation and Partnership Program (HEPPP) grant from the Australian Government Department of Education and Training.

In late 2016, Lisa Shipley was directly appointed on a 0.5 FTE basis. With ongoing HEPPP funding, the School of Rural Medicine will continue to employ Lisa Shipley in 2017 at a lecturer level on a full-time basis to both deliver the HEPPP program and to assist with delivering the Indigenous health curriculum of the Joint Medical Program (a joint initiative with the University of Newcastle), to increase engagement with those Indigenous students enrolled in the JMP at UNE and to progress her research profile.

The School of Arts continued to engage an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research Assistant on the research project, “Nourishing Culture and Developing Social Capital in a Community Garden. This project is led by Dr Katherine Wright, postdoctoral research Fellow in the School of Arts. There is ongoing opportunity for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Creative Practice Scholars in the School of Arts, to be involved in marking and teaching within units that are relevant to their expertise.

The School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences engaged a local Indigenous Psychologist to provide training for psychology students and to work closely with the Deputy Head of School and Director of the Psychology Clinical Program.  A criminology research group examining Indigenous Adult Education in Bourke NSW engaged an Indigenous research assistant. Indigenous HDR students were recruited as research assistants on natural resource management projects

Table 1 – Permanent positions

School/Directorate

Academic/Non-Academic by level

Position title

School

Academic C

Senior Lecturer

School

Academic B

Lecturer

School

Non-Academic HEO4

Administrative Assistant

Directorates

Non-Academic HEO7

Elder in Residence

Online Learning Student Engagement Officer

Student Services Manager

Senior HR Consultant (Aboriginal Employment)

Non-Academic HEO6

Student Services Officer

Systems Analyst/Programmer

Non-Academic HEO5

Client Services Officer

Non-Academic HEO4

Administrative Assistant

Student Services Administrative Assistant

Customer Service Officer

Plumber

Child Care Worker

Total

Total Academic: 2

 

Total Non-Academic: 17

Table 2 – Casual and fixed-term positions

School/Directorate

Academic/Non-Academic by level

Position title

Directorate (VC Office)

Fixed Term Academic B

VC’s Australian Indigenous Research Fellow

School

Fixed Term Academic A

Pre Doctoral Fellowship in Law

Associate Lecturer

School

Casual Academic

Casual Academic

School

Fixed Term Non-Academic HEO5

Aboriginal Support Officer

Executive Assistant

School

Casual Non-Academic HEO5

Casual General

School

Casual Non-Academic HEO4

Casual Technical Officer

Directorates

Contract Non-Academic

Director Oorala Aboriginal Centre

 

Casual Academic (ITAS)

Oorala ITAS Tutor

 

Casual Non-Academic HEO3

Casual General

Total

Total Academic: 5

 

Total Non-Academic: 9

Table 3 – Indigenous-specific positions

School/Directorate

Academic/Non-Academic by level

Position title

School

Permanent Academic C

Senior Lecturer

School

Permanent Academic B

Lecturer (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders)

School

Fixed Term Academic A

Pre Doctoral Fellowship in Law

Directorates

Fixed Term Academic B (VC’s Office)

VC’s Australian Indigenous Research Fellow

 

Contract Non-Academic

Director Oorala Aboriginal Centre

 

Permanent Non-Academic HEO7

Elder in Residence

Online Learning Student Engagement Officer

Student Services Manager

Senior HR Consultant (Aboriginal Employment)

 

Permanent Non-Academic HEO6

Student Services Officer

 

Fixed Term Non-Academic HEO5

Aboriginal Support Officer

 

Permanent Non-Academic HEO4

Administrative Assistant

Student Services Administration Assistant

Total

Total Academic: 4

Total Non-Academic: 9

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy

The UNE Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy 2013–2018 (the Strategy) details the University’s commitment to increasing the representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as UNE employees.

The Strategy identifies four objectives representing the key results areas of the Strategy:

  • Community Partnerships – strengthening relations between the community and UNE;
  • Career Development – building meaningful career paths for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff;
  • Becoming a Good Employer – building understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and appropriate workforce management practices;
  • Attracting and Retaining – increasing meaningful employment options for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples; and,
  • Includes aspirational employment targets for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait peoples in permanent/continuing positions across UNE.

Responsibility for meeting these targets has been devolved to the Schools and Directorates. An exemption from the Australian Human Rights Commission (NSW) was successfully sought to increase the number of targeted positions to 30 by the end of 2018.

In 2016, the Strategy was overseen by the UNE Human Resources Directorate.

Engagement with Schools and Directorates by the Aboriginal Employment Officer facilitates identification of suitable positions and candidates for identified or designated positions. Relationships with local job agencies has also been established.

To promote a culturally appropriate workforce the University introduced a one-day cultural awareness workshop that has been attended by senior management and staff from across the University. These workshops promote an awareness and understanding of the valuable contribution of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community has made to UNE and to foster a strong commitment from staff at all levels to the recruitment and retention of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff.

In 2016 the University increased the number of Indigenous PhD candidates by awarding four fully-funded stipends for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students commencing in the 2016 academic year, with an additional four to be awarded commencing in 2017. Fully funded stipends beyond 2017 will be subject to the availability of ongoing funds. These stipends are awarded for students studying toward the achievement of a research masters/doctoral qualification. Casual engagement in academic roles has been established. Future employment in academic roles is a possible outcome for these students on completion of their studies with the potential to address the under representation of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander academic staff in the future.

In 2016 UNE formed an Indigenous Governance Working Party to work on the three connected issues of increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment, developing an Indigenous Employment Policy and Indigenous governance at UNE. The Working Party has representation from Schools, Directorates and senior executive. It is due to report in 2017.

AEP Goal 3: Equitable access to higher education

3. Ensure equitable access of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to higher education.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

  • Commencing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student numbers for 2016 (access rate) as compared to 2015 (please provide an all student comparison).
  • Programs run, by the University, to improve access by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.
  • Details on outreach activities and their effectiveness, in attracting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. (See table below).
  • Details of Indigenous-specific and other scholarships offered by your University.(See table below).
  • Promotion of scholarships to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and take-up rates, including reasons for low take-up of available scholarships.
  • Indigenous Education/Support Unit’s role.

UNE identifies Indigenous access, participation and retention in higher education as a strategic priority and this is reflected in UNE’s Mission-based Compact 2014–2016. The provision of alternative entry pathways to UNE for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students has proven to be a successful strategy to improve access, with the number of commencing Indigenous students growing steadily (see table below).

Retention and completion remain the focus for ongoing improvement activity and UNE acknowledges that improving access to higher education for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates will require a sustained University-wide commitment to implement short, medium and long-term priorities as outlined in UNE’s Strategic Plan 2016–2020 and it subordinate Teaching and Learning Strategic Plan 2012–2016 and the Research Plan 2016–2020, that include the following strategies:

  • Provide effective academic scaffolding and support services.
  • Innovate in the recruitment and retention of regional, remote and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and staff, particularly within the New England region.
  • Employ innovative recruitment and retention activities aimed at regional, remote and Indigenous students, particularly within the New England region.
  • Develop innovative partnerships focused on students from low SES areas and Indigenous students (e.g. alternative entry pathways, scholarships, strategic courses) that build capacity in these students and their communities.
  • Ensure our graduate attributes promote social and cultural understanding including an appreciation of Indigenous culture and history.
  • Establish alternative pathways and academic support programs that address Indigenous and low SES student participation in higher degree programs.

Commencing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

2015

2016

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

391

340

Non-Indigenous students (Domestic students only):

9,179

8,538

Programs to improve access (Oorala)

Program name

Target audience

Outline of program

Outcome

TRACKS Tertiary Preparation Program

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants (18 years and over)

Ongoing alternative entry program offered on campus and online through Oorala; Tertiary preparation assists Indigenous students to develop their study skills and their transition to mainstream UNE courses (TRACKS includes five core TRAX units and one undergraduate unit).

In 2016, there were a total of 68 students enrolled in Oorala's TRACKS program, comprising 43 commencing and 25 continuing students. Forty-five students were enrolled off campus and on-campus and 23 on-campus.

In 2016, eleven students successfully completed the TRACKS program.

In 2016, 19 Indigenous students studying at UNE had come through the TRACKS program.

Internal Selection Program (ISP)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants (18 years and over)

Ongoing alternative entry program offered on campus through Oorala; Testing and assessment for UNE course admission; applicants are either recommended for admission to their selected UNE degree or alternatively the TRACKS Program or other tertiary study options

In 2016, eight prospective students participated in the ISP program for admission to commence undergraduate study in Trimesters 1 and 2, 2016, and Trimester 1, 2017. All of these applicants were subsequently successful in admission to UNE undergraduate courses.

UNE Pathways Enabling Course

All applicants who do not meet standard entry requirements for UNE undergraduate courses and have not successfully completed any part of a university course.

Ongoing enabling program offered online through UNE. It prepares students for admission to UNE undergraduate courses. Pathways includes two foundation units and two undergraduate units, with mentoring and additional tutorial support.

Total enrolments of Indigenous students in UNE’s Pathways Enabling Course were 43 in 2015 and 37 in 2016.

Programs to improve access (School of Rural Medicine)

Program name

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

Miroma Bunbilla Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Medical Entry Program

The Joint Medical Program (JMP) offers up to 17 positions each year across UNE and Newcastle campuses to students who identify as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

Eligible Indigenous applicants attend a one-week program for pre-entry to Medicine (testing, interviews, assessments) run by Wollotuka Institute, University of Newcastle.

Lisa Shipley attended the Miroma Bunbilla program held in 2016 and some of the students participating in the Miroma Bunbilla program travelled to Armidale to spend two days at UNE.

2 applicants from the Newcastle based Miroma Bunbilla Aboriginal Entry Pathway visited UNE for 2 days.

3 students started Medicine at UNE   in 2016.From this visit UNE gained 1 Aboriginal student (of the 9 who were   offered places for 2017 in the JMP).

Kruki Summer School, funded by HEPPP.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students attending high schools (years 9 to 12) in regional and rural NSW.

One week residential program experiencing medical school, attending anatomy classes, tutorials, a simulated emergency at the Tablelands Clinical School. Staying at the Mary While College at UNE with their families, participants enjoy UNE facilities including Sports UNE and the library.

20 participants were selected from the 35 applications received from the contact with High Schools. 18 students (from the 20 who accepted) attended KRUKI.

In addition, 15 parents/guardians attended.

KRUKI students came from the following high schools:

  • Armidale High School x 1
  • Coleambally High School x3
  • Gunnedah High School x1
  • Tamworth McCarthy Catholic College x1
  • Peel High School Tamworth x2
  • Walcha Central School x1
  • Miller Technology High School X2
  • Randwick Girls High x2
  • Nyngan High School x1
  • Kurri Kurri High School x1
  • James Fallon HIGH School x1
  • Canowindra High School x1
  • Five Islands Secondary College x1

Following the KRUKI Summer School an   article on the Oorala Facebook site received

  • Reach (3,500)
  • Reactions, comments, shares (136)
  • Post clicks (802)

KRUKI Information and Application Flyer

123 High Schools across the UNE   footprint and to promote the School of Rural Medicine, Aboriginal and Torres   Strait Islander entry pathway and the Kruki Summer School Program.

51 responses were received from  these schools. Of these 17 were from Careers Advisors/AEOs)

School Strategic driven change

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students attending high schools (years 9 to 12) in regional and rural NSW.

Funds were requested to contribute ($5000 per year) to the Miroma Bunbilla indigenous access program for activities to be delivered at UNE (new activity from 2017).

Approved.

Programs to improve access (Schools of Law and Business)

Programs to improve access Program name

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

HEPPP Project –

Direct engagement with New England and North West Aboriginal communities to increase enrolments in Law and Business Courses.

Indigenous High School Students

School visits to promote Indigenous participation in Law and Business degrees. Participate in Oorala Aboriginal Centre engagement activities including Aboriginal Youth Development Camps and UNE On-Campus Experience Days.

Increased Indigenous enrolments by 10%.

Further HEPP funding has been secured to continue this program in 2017, with a full-time project officer appointed to continue outreach activities and develop Aboriginal student retention initiatives.

Place-based Aboriginal Community Engagement

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander School Students and Community Members

To foster community relationships and build aspirations for tertiary study in communities within the New England, North West and North Coast Areas, providing outreach support and promotion of Higher Education in Law and Business.

Discussions held with local Aboriginal Education Consultative Groups, Lands Councils, Elders, Students, Principals, Teachers and Families.

Diploma of Business

All students including Indigenous students

Students have options to undertake 8 units with some specific Indigenous focus (equating to an Indigenous Organisation Management Major) that may lead into the Bachelor of Business.

 

Engagement of Aboriginal Support Officer, UNE Business School and School of Law

All indigenous students

HEPPP Funded project to improve retention rates and to increase numbers of Indigenous students undertaking tertiary studies in Business and Law.

To support successful completion of units and courses.

Programs to improve access (Schools of Humanities)

Programs to improve access Program name

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

PALS for HUMS

(HEPPP funded)

Low-SES students

Peer mentors in the new BA foundation unit HUMS103

Planned in 2016, will commence in T2 2017

Programs to improve access (Schools of Health)

Programs to improve access Program name

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

Cadetship with NSW Health

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Any Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nursing student entering an undergraduate degree

About 6 signed up for 2017

Cadetship with NSW Health

Direct Entry (Interview pathway)

Any nursing student

An alternative pathway for enrolment

About 35 (with 5 being Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander)

Direct Entry (Interview pathway)

Outreach activities (Oorala)

Outreach activity

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

4 HEPPP-funded Experience Days

Low-SES regional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander high schools students

The program successfully showcased a number of UNE disciplines and engaged high students in workshops, demonstrations and lectures.

Staff from local high schools provided supervision of students and actively participated in the various sessions.

Apart from extending students’ expectations of their ability to complete a university course, the program also created stronger links between the Oorala Centre, UNE staff and participating high schools.

A total of 56 student participants and 15 supervising adults attended the fours experience days. The number of participants exceeded the projected number of attendees of 40. Survey feedback from all participants was extremely positive.

2 HEPPP-funded camps

Low-SES regional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander high schools students

A two-day camp was held for 15 Aboriginal high school boys on 18-19 August. Highly successful. Positive feedback from participants and sponsors.

Post camp survey findings:

  • Significant increase in students’ knowledge of Indigenous heritage.
  • Better knowledge of university options and Oorala Support Services.
  • Increased understanding of influence of their actions in the community.
  • Significant shift in the student’s motivation levels and broader career choices.

Outreach activities (Schools of Business and Law)

Outreach activity

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

High School Visits, New England, North West and North Coast Region

Years 9-12

26 High Schools were visited engaging over 400 students to discuss with students careers and study options in the field of business and law.

Increase enrolments of Aboriginal students at UNE beyond 2016.

Kimika Urala Camp ( Youth Leadership Camp) – Oorala to report

Years 8-10

Oorala to report

Oorala to report

UNE Law and Business Experience Day

Years 9-12

Oorala to report

Oorala to report

Outreach activities (School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences)

  • BCSS is committed to enhancing the learning outcome for ATSI students by embedding indigenous content in the curriculum, consulting with indigenous experts on course content, and including material and relevant links on the units Moodle site.

Outreach activity

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

Information session

As part of Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s University Experience Days, the Criminology unit at BCSS will be holding an information sessions for ATSI year 10 and 11 students from local high schools in June 2017.

None anticipated

Participation and promotion

Outreach activities (School of Environmental and Rural Sciences, and the School of Science and Technology)

Outreach activity

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

HSC Booster Day

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups, low socio economic areas and rural and regional areas.

The target audience for this activity is Year 12 students from rural and regional NSW. ERS and S&T offer intensive sessions in 14 different HSC subject areas to Year 12 students. We particularly encourage students to attend from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups and low socio economic areas. We facilitate this by providing meals and accommodation for the students who live over 100km from Armidale.

ERS and S&T staff provided intensive help to students with their HSC studies, and to ‘boost’ the students’ experience in their HSC subjects. We also provided Campus Tours to showcase the University and study opportunities. Many of the students attend this event to access the hands on activities.

Far Out Science

Far out Science is a two day event held at UNE and is designed to showcase to the students the wide world of Science and to celebrate the fun, exciting and intriguing side of Science

The excitement and stories that the students take home from this event, to share with their siblings and communities, helps to raise the profile of science and higher education to family, friends and the wider community.

UNE GRASS Teacher Professional Development Days

The UNE GRASS (Growing Regional and Agricultural Students in Science) Teacher Professional Development Days are run over two days and include an event dinner with a guest speaker. This event aims to showcase to Science teachers the variety of opportunities available to their students in the science and agricultural fields.

The outcome of this program is that teachers can return to the classroom to share with their students’ new activities and enthusiasm for opportunities in the world of science and agriculture.

UNE GRASS Industry Placement Scholarship

The UNE GRASS Industry Placement Scholarship showcases to Years 11 and 12 students, the broad range of exciting science-based careers that support primary industries. Full Industry Placement Scholarship offerings are made following an application, interview and after working with students at the camp.

The outcome of this program is that more students from these areas and backgrounds are encouraged to attend University and once they have completed their education, they are more likely to take this knowledge back to their communities.

Oorala Experience Day

Years 9 and 10 Indigenous Students

Science and Technology staff ran a chemistry practical experience and an encounter with ants.

In the chemistry lab the students made aspirin and also did some basic calculations to work out how efficient their experiments were in terms of their yield of aspirin. It was highly rated for engagement, and student’s had friendly competition with one another in getting the best result.

Students also attended to a presentation on the diverse world of ants, then spent some time collecting ants outside and then in the lab using scientific information to try and identify the genus and species of the ants they found.

Outreach activities (School of Rural Medicine)

Outreach activity

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

Teddy Bear Doctors

Young primary school children

The School identifies local schools (including those with high proportion of indigenous students) to discuss health issues using students own teddy bears as the focus.

Paediatrician accompanied by several Year 4 students visit and enjoy a few hours talking with students about problems or health issues they relay through their teddy bear.

Medical students learn communication skills with young children. Young indigenous children learn to talk about health issues with health practitioners.

Relationship with schools opens doors to more visits and identification of children with aspirations towards studying in health-related areas.

Presentations by the School of Rural Medicine Aboriginal Academic

Parramatta Futures Campus

Video Conference Presentation to Regional Careers Advisors Conference in Partnership with Oorala staff.

20+ in attendance.

2 x NAIDOC events

Armidale and Tamworth

To create a UNE/School of Rural Medicine presence at a community level.

300+ people in attendance over all.

Aboriginal Interagency/Community Meetings

Armidale x2

Tamworth x2 Toomelah x1

to promote the JMP/School of Rural Medicine

60+ people in attendance overall.

Presentations from the School of Rural Medicine Aboriginal Academic

Aboriginal students (in years 9-12 inclusive):

  • Armidale High School,
  • Duval High School,
  • New England Girls Grammar School,
  • Tamworth High School,
  • O’Connor Catholic School.

50+ students in attendance

9+ staff in attendance,

5+ parents in attendance over all.

Outreach activities (School of Health)

Outreach activity

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

Youth Development day (Male and Female run through Oorala)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

A1 day orientation or workshop for school aged children with nursing staff in attendance to discuss the BN program

Small numbers are recruited (about 2 in 2017)

Outreach activities (School of Humanities)

Outreach activity

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

Narran Lakes Project

Indigenous community members in the Walgett, Lightning Ridge, Angledool area

A research engagement between the Narran Lakes Nature Reserve Co-Management Committee, UNE (Archaeology), OEH, and NSW NPWS including School visits and talks at the Walgett School (staff and students from UNE) and on country at Narran Lakes

Engagement continues, no students yet recruited due to short time frame

Walcha Community project

Indigenous community members in the Walcha area

Visited local Aboriginal cultural heritage sites with Indigenous community members

Engagement continues

Outreach activities (Marketing and Public Affairs)

Outreach activity

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

MGOALS

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students

Collaboration with Oorala Aboriginal Centre and MPA on the MGoals project.

The MGoals program supports Aboriginal Culture and Education by providing local Aboriginal communities and schools with an online project that assists students to create their goals for living and learning.

MGoals components:

The first is a website building project. The project encourages schools to collaborate with their local Aboriginal community in building a local community website resource. The website is used to share and celebrate local history, cultural information and programs that are being run in support of Aboriginal Education;

An online goal-setting program, where students interact with teachers, parents and mentors to set goals for living and learning.

Planning phase completed 2016 for implementation 2017.

National advertising

Prospective indigenous students

Promotion of mainstream courses plus Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-specific pathways in online and offline media channels.

Completed 2016

Scholarship promotions

Prospective indigenous students

Promotion of scholarships to Early Entry applicants, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-specific application pathways.

Completed 2016

Marketing materials, and re-branding for Aboriginal Centre

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students – current and future

Development of prospectus and a range of marketing and informational materials for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and re-branding.

Awaiting final approval 2016

Oorala website redevelopment

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students – current and future

Redevelopment of the Oorala Aboriginal Centre website

Awaiting final approval 2016

Scholarships

Scholarship details

Government/ Private/
University

No. Allocated

Cost

No. awarded

Comments

UNE Indigenous-specific scholarships, 2016

Hunter New England Population Health Aboriginal Nursing Scholarship

University Donor Scholarship

3

(1 each for 1st Year, 2nd Year and 3rd Year Students)

First Year Student $5,000.00 for Full-time studies or $2,500.00 for Part-time studies

Second Year Student: $6,000.00 for Full-time studies or $3,000.00 for Part-time studies

Third Year Student:$7,500.00 for Full-time studies or $3750.00 for Part-time studies

1
(1st year)

1 awarded to 1st year applicant.

No applications from 2nd or 3rd year Student

Ella Schroder Indigenous Residential Scholarship

University Donor Scholarship

1

Annual Accommodation cost to a maximum of $10,000

0

Open to school leavers with financial and geographical disadvantage, who have completed high school at boarding school. For applicants who will study on campus and live in a UNE residential college. No applicants in 2016

Max Schroder Scholarship

University Donor Scholarship

4

1 awarded to 1st year applicant. No applicants for 2nd or 3rd Year Student places.

3

Open to school leavers and current

students with financial and geographical disadvantage, for on campus study. (2 of 4 places were allocated for Teaching and Nursing degrees; in 2015 the donor approved award to students in any discipline).

Max Schroder Male Indigenous Mentoring Scholarship

University Donor Scholarship

1

Full residential scholarship
or up to $8000pa

1

Open to final year undergraduate students and postgraduate students.

Awarded to an Undergraduate student

Max Schroder Female Indigenous Mentoring Scholarship

University Donor Scholarship

1

Full residential scholarship or up to $8000pa

1

Open to final year undergraduate students and postgraduate students.

Awarded to undergraduate student

Max Schroder SportUNE Scholarship

University Donor Scholarship

2

$3000 for 1 year

0

Open to Indigenous school leaver and gap year applicants who demonstrate sporting achievements at high level and financial disadvantage.

No applicants in 2016.

Indigenous Student Reward Scholarship to attend the World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Education (WIPCE) in Canada in July 2017 School and Oorala Centre 4 $3000 4 The School nominated a student for this award in 2017.

Total Indigenous-specific

16

10

Scholarships (continued)

Scholarship details

Government/ Private/
University

No. Allocated

Cost

No. Awarded

Comments

Other Scholarships, 2016

Equity Scholarships (Open to Equity Groups)

UNE

Variable

Variable amount depending on the application

(for items to directly assist capacity to study)

1

Open to applicants from Equity groups; high number of applications (2 out of 31 applicants were Indigenous)

ATSIPP Indigenous Student Conference Attendance Award

Australian Psychological Society (APS)2 per year$12000The School of BCSS encourages Psychology Indigenous students to apply for this scholarship to attend the annual APS conference.
Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme (PHMSS)Government1Up to $15000 per year0The School of BCSS encourages Psychology Indigenous students to apply for this scholarship.
Australian Psychological Society Bendi Lango BursaryAustralian Psychological Society (APS)VariousUp to $15000 per year0 

Total other scholarships

   

1

 

NEW 2016 Indigenous Commonwealth Equity Scholarships

Scholarship details

Government/ Private/
University

No. Allocated

Cost

No. Awarded

Comments

IAS

Government

32

$156,928.00

24

 

IAS Additional funding for Trimester 2 2016

Government

4

$19,616.00

  

ICAS

Government

7

$36,393.00

7

 

IECAS

Government

5

$25,995.00

1

 

ICECS

Government

22

$57,178.00

17

 

ICECS Additional funding for T2 2016

Government

10

$25,990.00

  

IECECS

Government

25

$64,975.00

8

 

IECECS Additional for T2 2016

Government

4

$10,396.00

  

Total

 

109

$397,471.00

57

 

Continuing 2016 Indigenous Commonwealth Equity Scholarships

Scholarship details

Government/ Private/University

No. Allocated

Cost

No. Awarded

Comments

ICAS

Government

10

$51,980

6

4 ICAS not continued in 2016 periods

ICECS

Government

20

$51,980

9

5 ICECS not continued in 2016 periods

School of Education

  • The School of Education supported Mr Michael Kirk to attend two conferences run by the Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Program (HEPPP) “Schools and University Connect Project” – the conferences were held in Coffs Harbour (24-26 November 2016) and Parramatta (30 November – 02 December 2016).
  • The NSW Department of Education provides scholarships for students to teach in high Aboriginal student enrolment schools (known as the Enhanced Teacher Education Training Project), to undertake a program which includes addressing specific issues in working with Aboriginal children in schools and with their local communities. As part of this program, each student must undertake a project with the local Indigenous community, working with the local community, its Elders and liaison officers in Schools. This project, coordinated by the Head of School, must be approved by Oorala, to ensure cultural appropriateness, as well as sustainable outcomes for the students at the school and in the local community. Enhanced links were made with Oorala to provide local indigenous knowledge in a formal manner to the students involved.
  • The School of Education supported Mr Michael Kirk in tailoring his academic program so he could be included in the New Colombo Plan $3,000 scholarship to engage with the Short Study Program held in Bhutan October 2016.

Promotion of scholarships to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

UNE promotion of scholarship opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in 2016 included:

  • UNE Undergraduate and Commonwealth Equity Scholarships are advertised on UNE’s Scholarships homepage at: http://www.une.edu.au/study/scholarships/undergraduate-scholarships
  • In 2016 UNE also increased targeted online promotions through its ‘blog’ and social media channels, direct promotion via bulk emails to all enrolled Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and to enrolment cohorts from this group who met specific eligibility. These strategies, together with information for dissemination through Oorala Aboriginal Centre, aimed to increase demand for scholarships where low take-up rates were identified. UNE Schools also promoted scholarships to students in specific disciplines.
AEP Goal 4: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student participation rate

4. Achieve the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in higher education, at rates commensurate with those of all other Australians.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

  • The total number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student enrolments for 2016, compared to 2015 (please provide an all student comparison).
  • Details of your Universities’ strategies to address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student participation.
  • Indigenous Education/Support Unit’s role.

The total number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student enrolments is as follows:

 

2015

2016

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students:

696

706

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (Domestic students only):

21,633

21,066

Strategies to address participation (School of Rural Medicine)

Strategies

Outline of strategies

Constraints

Outcome

Submission of School strategic driven change proposal

Funds were requested to assist with supporting existing students to attend the Aboriginal Indigenous Doctors’ association (AIDA) annual event, noting AIDA’s goal to reach population parity of Aboriginal Doctors

Attending this conference provides these Indigenous medical students to establish networks – an important consideration given the absence of an established Aboriginal Medical Service in Armidale.

The University of Newcastle supports 8 AIDA registrations /year – four from the School and four from Wollotuka – the equivalent of Oorala Centre.

Non-recurrent funding

(2- 3 students per year, totalling $10k).

Strategies to address participation (Schools of Business and Law)

Strategies

Outline of strategies

Constraints

Outcome

UNE Business School continued to offer courses with Indigenous content

UNE Business School continued to offer courses with Indigenous content

Dependent upon allocation of targeted promotion to prospective students.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander enrolments in Business continue to increase.

Law students Indigenous Community Moodle site

This site was created to build an online community for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander law students at UNE, it provides information on news and events, academic supports, career and professional development opportunities.

The site currently managed by School of Law academic staff, within existing workloads and budgets.

Student engagement with the site is being monitored.

Build the number of indigenous HDR students

Scholarships to support student participation.

Funding allocation

Increase number of HDR students.

Strategies to address participation (School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences)

Strategies

Outline of strategies

Constraints

Outcome

Information session

As part of Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s University Experience Days, the Criminology unit at BCSS will be holding an information sessions for ATSI year 10 and 11 students from local high schools in June 2017.

None anticipated

Participation and promotion

Respecting Indigeneity Strategic Plan

The School created the Respecting lndigeneity Strategic Plan to guide the School’s overall operations and partly to increase applications for the School's Muriel Snow Scholarship for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, details available at:

http://www.une.edu.au/about-une/academic-schools/bcss/current-students/scholarships-and-awards/bcss-prizes

No additional funding required

Underpins the School’s strategic planning and service provision

Strategies to address participation (School of Health)

Strategies

Outline of strategies

Constraints

Outcome

Oorala relationship

Academic staff met with each Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student individually to outline course expectations

No

Great relationships with all Indigenous students and staff and positive outcomes for ATIS students in the School

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student support academic

An academic has responsibility for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander liaison and support as an on-going aspect of their role.

Limited number, only 1

Provides excellent link s between Oorala, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and the Bachelor of Nursing program

All academic staff participle[ate in Oorala activities (e.g. NADOCH, Close the Gap Day)

All SOH staff are encouraged and supported to attend and participate in ATIS cultural events at the University or in the local community.

Time and workload commitments

Keeps staff current with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander issues And allows for staff engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural practices.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural Awareness day

Offered to all university staff on a monthly basis through Professional Development.

Only offered once a month and staff workloads and time commitments.

Positive insights into ATIS culture with stronger relationships and networks with Oorala

Strategies to address participation (School of Arts)

Strategies

Outline of strategies

Constraints

Outcome

Indigenous Mentoring Program

An Indigenous mentoring program was formulated the School of Arts in consultation with Paul Callaghan in 2016 for 2017 implementation to be delivered by the 2015 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Creative Practice Scholars.

No additional resources to run this program

Good feedback from students who participated.

Strategies to address participation (Oorala)

Strategies

Outline of strategies

Constraints

Outcome

Employment of an Online Engagement Officer

In 2016 we used HEPPP project funds to develop a Moodle site specifically for Indigenous students, providing a chat room, and a vehicle for communication between the students and between Oorala staff and students.

Regular posts to the Oorala Facebook page has greatly increased the level of interest and the number of “likes”.

Students are bombarded by emails, social media posts and other communications from UNE, friends and other sources at a time when they are busy with their studies. It is hard to make an impact in that environment.

The position has made a significant impact on Oorala’s reach with its Facebook page and we have built a Moodle site for Indigenous students.

Student support

Oorala offers are wide range of services to promote the participation of Indigenous students at UNE. These include:

  • General assistance for student by phone and face-to-face with their issues;
  • Personalised case management of students “at risk” of dropping out;
  • Tutoring program;
  • An on-campus student lab with computers and wifi access;
  • An Elder-in-Residence;
  • Public events to mark NAIDOC Week, Sorry Day etc.

The physical constraints of the resources we have available.

About 2/3 of our students are online and it is more difficult to cater to their needs, hence the creation of the above position.

A significant number of students use Oorala’s services, especially tutoring and the student lab. We have testimonials from many graduating students praising the work of Oorala staff and the services we provide.

Tutoring

Oorala provides tutoring support specifically tailored to the needs of Indigenous students. During 2016 Oorala’s Student Support Team coordinated the provision of 3260 hours of tutoring to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students at UNE.

Requests for tutoring continued to rise through the year. We were forced to seek an additional funding of $60,000 from UNE to meet the needs of students.

A greatly increased number of tutoring hours provided, compared to 2015.

Case management of at risk students

Students deemed “at risk” by the UNE Automated Wellness Engine are assigned to a Student Support Officer at Oorala to provide a range of support.

Large number of students per student support worker

Significant improvement in retention rate in 2016.

AEP Goal 5: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student graduation rate

5. Enable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to attain the same completion rates from award courses in higher education as for other Australians.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

  • The total number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student completions at Bachelor level and above in 2016, compared to 2015 (please provide an all student comparison).
  • Support mechanisms you have in place to assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to complete their study.
  • Indigenous Education/Support Unit’s role.

The totals for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student completions at Bachelor level and above (62 in 2014, 41 in 2015 and 42 in 2016) reflect an unacceptably low rate compared to all students. In response, UNE and the Oorala Aboriginal Centre refocussed efforts directed towards improving student retention and completion.

UNE’s strategies to increase access and support for students in Bachelor degrees and postgraduate courses including higher degrees, are expected to improve this trend over the medium term. We expect completions to increase in the coming years because the commencing numbers have increased from 286 to 364 from 2014 to 2015. The slight drop to 340 commencing students in 2016 is not seen at this stage to be part of a trend. Oorala’s student numbers in its pathways program – TRACKS – continues to increase. We are employing a consultant in 2017 to develop some statistics around why people who complete the TRACK program don’t enrol in a course and whether those who do have greater success than non-TRACKS students.

Degree and postgraduate student completions, 2013–15

Graduations - prepared 03/05/2017

Year is reporting year to govt and include graduations from 1 April of the previous year to 31 March of the reporting year

Higher Degree by Research

2013

2014

2015

2016

ATSI

  

1

 

non ATSI

77

83

87

97

Support mechanisms (Library)

Support mechanisms

Description

Constraints

Outcome

Targeted Library Orientation Sessions

Orientation sessions conducted by Library staff to inform Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students about library services and resources. Consultation between Library staff and Oorala staff to provide sessions designed for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

Staff resource limitations

Increased engagement with the Library. Service to be reviewed regularly with Oorala staff and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

Support mechanisms (Schools of Business and Law)

Support mechanisms

Description

Constraints

Outcome

Engagement of full time Aboriginal Support Officer within the School

Student support

Dependent on students willing to engage.

Improved academic performance, improved student engagement with academic staff

HEPPP funded peer support program for low socio economic students

Student support

Dependent on students willing to engage.

Improved academic performance, improved student engagement with academic staff

Support mechanisms (School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences)

Support mechanisms

Description

Constraints

Outcome

Added information on all BCSS Moodle unit site

In line with the BCSS Cultural Awareness Policy, the Moodle site for each unit in offered by the School has a Welcome to Country & Indigenous Program statement, a Welcome to Country Video, link to the Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme, and the AIME program

None

Easy access for students

Support mechanisms (School of Education)

Support mechanisms

Description

Constraints

Outcome

Identifying disciplinary literacy needs of ITE students seeking support for academic study through Oorala Centre

Embedding culturally responsive literacy support within selected units of study

Research collaboration with Oorala Centre staff to provided targeted support to increase retention and completion

(Chan, Devrim, Posthausen, Carter)

Research collaboration with Oorala Centre staff to provided targeted support to increase retention and completion

(Chan, Devrim, Posthausen, Carter)

(project in progress)

Support mechanisms (Oorala)

Support mechanisms

Description

Constraints

Outcome

Case management of “at risk” students

From July to December 2017 Oorala Aboriginal Centre (OAC) trialled direct contact of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students who were identified via the Automated Wellness Engine (AWE). This system identifies students who are likely to be ‘at risk’ in their enrolled units at UNE. 540 individual Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students were contacted

The no. of at risk students per Student Support Officer were high and a strain on resources throughout 2016.

The process was developed and documented by a Project Officer. A follow-up survey was conducted with a select number of students. Survey results included:

All students felt that they could be open and honest case manager;

A low number of student (29%) had a tutor

Those students with tutors were very satisfied with the service (100%)

Study load was an issue for some students

There is a need for specialised services and counseling

Some students would like additional services, e.g. childminding and accommodation

More academic workshops were requested, Moodle, UNE Systems and referencing.

AEP Goal 6: Understanding and respect for traditional and contemporary culture

6. To provide all Australian students with an understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander traditional and contemporary cultures.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

  • Details of how and to what extent Indigenous perspectives are reflected in curriculum at your University.
  • How the University addresses the cultural competency of its staff and students.
  • The University’s involvement with Indigenous community members in working toward this goal.
  • Indigenous Education/Support Unit’s role.

Curriculum

The units offered by the Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Students taking the units offered by Oorala:

 

2015

2016

OORA100 Aboriginal Resilience and the Arts

33

35

OORA200 Working with Aboriginal People

172

340

OORA300 Aboriginal Resilience and the Arts

8

5

OORA400 Working with Aboriginal People

12

5

OORA100

Core unit

Listed

Bachelor of Music

TRACKS Tertiary Preparation Program

Bachelor of Education (K-6 Teaching)

Diploma in Music Skills

Diploma in Professional Communication

OORA200

Core

Prescribed

Listed

Bachelor of Nursing
(Rule (a) and (d);
Rule (b),
Rule (c))

Bachelor of Social Work

Master of Nursing Practice

Advanced Diploma in Arts (Indigenous Studies)

Bachelor of Arts (Indigenous Studies)

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Business (Bachelor of Arts component – Indigenous Studies)

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Laws (Bachelor of Arts component – Indigenous Studies)

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science (Bachelor of Arts component – Indigenous Studies)

Bachelor of Education (Primary) (Schedule 2 – Contextual Studies in Education; Rural and Remote Education and Indigenous Communities)

Bachelor of Audiometry (General Program)

Bachelor of Criminology

Bachelor of Criminology/Bachelor of Laws (Bachelor of Criminology component)

Bachelor of Education (K-6 Teaching) (English; Language; Mathematics; Science and Technology)

Bachelor of Educational Studies

Bachelor of Social Science (Aboriginal Perspectives)

Diploma in Business (Indigenous Organisation Management)

Diploma in Community Welfare and Wellbeing (General Program)

Diploma in Educational Studies

Diploma in Professional Communication

OORA300

Listed

Advanced Diploma in Arts (Indigenous Studies)

Bachelor of Arts (Indigenous Studies)

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Business (Bachelor of Arts component – Indigenous Studies)

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science (Bachelor of Arts component – Indigenous Studies)

Bachelor of Media and Communications (Media and Culture; Writing and Publishing)

Bachelor of Social Science (Aboriginal Perspectives)

Bachelor of Theatre and Performance

Master of Arts (Theatre and Performance – Rule (a), (b))

OORA400

Prescribed

Listed

Master of Arts (Indigenous Studies – Rule (c))

Graduate Certificate in Arts (Theatre and Performance – Rule (a) and (b))

Master of Nursing

Master of Nursing (General Program

School of Rural Medicine

The Joint Medical Program (with the University of Newcastle) (JMP) is accredited by the Australian Medical Council (AMC) as meeting AMC Standards for a primary medical program provided by an Australian University. In accrediting the JMP BMed program, the AMC has acknowledged that the graduates of the JMP meet the expected graduate attributes. The ability to work effectively, competently and safety in a diverse cultural environment include Indigenous cultures is one of the graduate attributes expected of a student completing the JMP. Graduates of the JMP are expected to have knowledge, understanding and skills in Indigenous Health. Students are required to complete the Indigenous Health component of the JMP BMed, and undertake the required assessments to demonstrate their knowledge of Indigenous Health and competencies in understanding the Indigenous culture. The course outcomes that were added to the BMedSc/MD which are specific to Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders are:

  • demonstrate that they respect and embrace the history, culture and diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples; and
  • demonstrate that they are committed to providing culturally competent, holistic, patient-centred care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

For the Unit MEDI1101A, the specific unit outcomes are:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the core principles of cultural competence and the skills for sensitively identifying patients of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin;
  • apply fundamental tools and principles of epidemiology to identify and measure the burden of illness of major health challenges facing Australia and other countries, including the gaps in health status and outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people;
  • apply fundamental tools and principles of epidemiology to identify and measure the burden of illness of major health challenges facing Australia and other countries, including the gaps in health status and outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
School of Health
  • The BN curriculum is inclusive of the current guidelines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, culture and health set by the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives.
  • All undergraduate BN / MNP students in the School of Health undertake the Aboriginal Health unit delivered through Oorala.
  • Other units offer case studies and address specific health needs of ATIS peoples at a range of points within the BN and MNP courses.
School of Education
  • Acknowledgement of Country is included at the beginning of every formal lecture (and lecture recording).
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures and Histories is a cross-curriculum priority area in the Australian Curriculum.  Selected resources, texts for student analysis and readings incorporating Indigenous perspectives are included in unit materials and activities.
  • All Course and Unit Coordinators are specifically invited to include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives, readings and education implications in their courses and units.  All Education courses (undergraduate and postgraduate) include Aboriginal Education units, which detail Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives and also cover the history of education, policy and government acts in Australia with implications for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
School of Environmental and Rural Sciences
  • Traditional Ecological knowledge is taught in first year in ECOL100 (Ecology: Concepts and Applications) and at higher levels (e.g. EM353 Conservation Biology). Our lecturers explain that Science is one of many knowledge systems, but that it is important to consider other systems for additional information that can inform holistic management of ecosystems. An important axiom of what we teach is that traditional knowledge depends on country for its context and significance, and that Aboriginal systems of knowledge are place and people specific.
  • Indigenous perspectives are examined in the first year curriculum in unit RSNR110: Sustaining our Rural Environment 1 - taken by all environmental, agricultural and engineering courses in the School of ERS through field excursions, lectures and in class discussions. At the end of this unit students: understand the importance of land to cultural and spiritual identity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; know recent changes in legal opinion and government policy in relation to native title and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage; and appreciate the significance of changes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. They are examined on their cultural understanding in the final examination;
  • ERS includes a core unit at third year – EM312 Environmental Impact Assessment - where students learn about indigenous considerations and requirements for development. There are speakers in from Office of Environment and Heritage to explain the policy and legal safeguards for indigenous cultural heritage. Students are examined on this;
  • Throughout the programs ERS also have a number of elective units that consider natural resource management and policy in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander traditional and contemporary culture values are addressed.
  • In 2016 ERS had a review of Environmental Science courses at UNE and the Oorala Aboriginal Centre provided comprehensive consultation response as below.  Consequently, one of the recommendations in the review report was for increased and mapped integration of Indigenous perspectives into the degree and units, and to work with the Oorala Centre to explore pathways to better enable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to pursue the degrees.  The recommendations of the report are for a 5 year period. To work with the Oorala Centre is to be implemented.
School of Arts
  • The School of Arts Operational Plan 2016–2018 included a new initiative – Indigenous Arts and Knowledge – with the School to become a hub for the development of Indigenous-based arts curricula aimed at recruiting and retaining higher Indigenous student numbers and developing high-profile branding around Indigenous research and epistemologies, especially related to the creative arts.
  • COMM381/581: The Art of Documentary. This unit includes modules on The Language of (Australian) Cinema;
  • THEA318:  Minorities and Majorities in Australian Theatre. This unit explores issues of power and identity (including gender, race, class and sexuality) within the context of recent Australian Theatre. Some of the topics to be covered are: women's theatre; multicultural theatre; Aboriginal theatre; and gay and lesbian theatre.
School of Business

Indigenous content is embedded in a number of courses and units through UNE Business School, e.g. MM591 ‘Managing Across Cultures’ and MM545 ‘Organisational Leadership’ which includes topics regarding ‘Employing Indigenous Australians’; also MM200 ‘Contemporary Management’ has a broad focus on cultural diversity and social inclusion is addressed. The UNE Business School’s Master of Economic and Regional Development includes a major in Indigenous Futures which seeks to prepare students for a career involved in community and regional development projects.

School of Law

Within the UNE Bachelor of Laws program there are 6 core units and 6 elective units that include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander content (LAW101, LAW157, LAW164, LAW272, LAW281, LAW301, LAW312, LAW313, LAW314, LAW341, LAW358, LAW389, LAW400. For example, the core unit LAW101, Law in Context, includes Race and the Law with a focus on the colonization and the historical treatment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

School of Science and Technology
  • PHAR210 Pharmacy Practice I - Team written case study: students are required to develop a case on cross-cultural communication when trying to explain how medicines work.  While not specifically stipulated, the majority of students choose to develop a case involving an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patient;
  • PHAR222 Pharmacology I - Specific discussion of the differences in the risk factors and incidence/prevalence of cardiovascular disease in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australian populations;
  • PHAR310 Pharmacy Practice II - Specific discussion of cross-cultural communication with regards to patient counselling of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients with cardiovascular disease and discussion of differences in responses to medicines across different racial/ethnic groups including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals;
  • PHAR320 Pharmacy Practice III - Day-long Cultural Awareness training with Dave Widders, a local Anaiwan man. This was increased from the half-day session provided previously.  Specific discussion of cross-cultural communication with regards to patient counselling of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients with mental health disorders and discussion of differences in responses to medicines across different racial/ethnic groups including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals;
  • PHAR410 Pharmacy Practice IV and PHAR420 Pharmacy Practice V - Reinforce discussions from PHAR310 and PHAR320 regarding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients with cardiovascular disease and/or mental health disorders.
School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences
  • BCSS's Teaching and Learning Committee is exploring making OORA 200 a core or listed unit in courses offered by the School.
  • The Clinical Psychology Program provides students with a two day Intensive School delivered by an Aboriginal Psychologist, to support an understanding of sociocultural issues relevant to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  • The school has 21 units with some ATSI content including Indigenous languages, linguistics, Language and   the Law, psychology and sociology.
  • Indigenous issues are a feature of most of the criminology units (such as: CRIM314, CRIM324, CRIM305, CRIM306) with featured indigenous perspectives through guest lectures.
  • The staff at the Institute of Rural Futures (IRF) have research projects that deal with indigenous natural resource management which involves indigenous HDR students.
  • There are plans to develop an indigenous component on water allocations for a new post graduate course being developed for Geography and Planning.
  • New Geography degrees in Community Planning and Development will include units on indigenous issues and will likely be attractive to Local Land Councils.

Cultural competency

UNE’s Cultural Connections 2016 course was run by HR’s Senior Aboriginal Employment Consultant, in conjunction with the Oorala Aboriginal Centre. During 2016, 60 UNE staff participated in the workshops.

School of Rural Medicine (SRM)

Indigenous health is a core component of the JMP BMed program delivered by SRM. Students receive training in this component as well in communication skills with culturally diverse groups including Indigenous peoples. Staff are expected to attend cultural awareness training provided by UNE.

School of Arts

Staff are expected to participate in the University’s Cultural Immersion Program and are encouraged to avail themselves of other professional development opportunities.

School of Humanities

The School continues to contribute a range of units available in the TRACKS Tertiary Preparation Program. These currently include:

  • ARPA100            Great Excavations: Key Discoveries in Archaeology
  • ARPA104             Archaeology: Principles and Practices
  • ANCH111             Introduction to Ancient Rome
  • HIST150              Colonial Australia
  • HIST151              Modern Australia
  • PEAC100             Introduction to Peace Studies
  • RELS180             Exploring the Sacred
  • RELS182             World Religions Today
  • RELS184             Magic and the Supernatural in History and Culture

Other units with a focus on Aboriginal Australia include ARPA302 (Aboriginal Archaeology), ARPA352 (Public Archaeology and Management), HIST354 (Aboriginal History Since the Late 18th Century), and HIST338 (Australian Frontiers: Rural and Regional Histories).

The School continues to teach a suite of undergraduate and postgraduate units which focus on Indigeneity, addressed in the Australian context and comparatively with international examples. These units are available to Indigenous and non-Indigenous students and are offered in a range of awards. In the BA and related awards students can major in Indigenous Studies. Current (2017) Units taught are:

  • IDIG102                 Introduction to Indigenous Australia
  • IDIG103                 Indigeneity: A Global Experience
  • IDIG301/501          Analysing Change in Indigenous Societies: Politics and Public Policy
  • IDIG305/505          Indigenous Business and Community Development
  • IDIG306/506          Indigenous Health
  • IDIG311/511          Indigenous Peoples and Colonisation: Land & Nature.

In 2016, following the review of the Indigenous Studies Major, a revised Indigenous Studies major was agreed and has commenced in 2017. The course continues to offer national and global perspectives on indigeneity, including units taught through Oorala. Additionally, the School has developed a new Foundation unit (HUMS103) for the BA degree entitled “Controversies: Foundations of Critical Social Analysis” that includes case studies related to Indigenous issues in Australia.

School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences
  • A number of BCSS staff have completed the cultural awareness training made available to staff through the Human Resource Services directorate.
  • Senior staff in BCSS have met with Oorala staff to discuss strategies to enhance teaching and address issues and needs of Indigenous students.
  • There are number of ongoing research projects that involve aboriginal communities for example, a participatory model of community engagement and is collaborative with the Bourke and Enngonia Aboriginal communities. An informal session with community members has been hosted and catered by BCSS researchers in the field and it is anticipated that future sessions will be similarly hosted. Throughout the research it is hoped that access to education will be improved, as this access is a guiding principle of the research.
  • Sociology is intending on introducing an element of competence and sensitivity in their introductory unit (SOCY100) that will provide all Australian students with an understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander traditional and contemporary cultures.

Involvement with Indigenous community members

School of Rural Medicine (SRM)

Members of the Executive at SRM are liaising with Oorala Aboriginal Centre to develop a tailored cultural awareness training program for staff of the School.

Lisa Shipley, Lecturer is in working negotiations with the AMS’s i.e. Pat Dixon Centre (Armidale); Armajan (Inverell & Walcha); Pius X (Moree & Toomelah) and Tamworth Aboriginal Medical Service.

She has also:

  • attended meetings of the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet to advocate for equity in “Rural” Aboriginal education and health outcomes.
  • initiated discussions with Hunter New England Local Health District Population Health Aboriginal Team for future lecture and research relationships with the SRM.
  • established working relationship with UNE Futures Campus Parramatta who promoted Kruki through Sydney networks and through their social media
School of Arts

East Armidale New Indigenous Community Garden project is a collaborative project with involvement of the Aboriginal Oorala Centre, TAFE New England, Jobs Australia, Best Employment, the Clontarf Academy (Armidale High School), The Armidale School and UNE.

School of Health

The Coledale Health and Education Clinic is a partnership between the SoH, UNE and Walhallow Health (an Aboriginal Medical Service) for the purpose of providing health services to a disadvantaged community (primarily Aboriginal) and education opportunities to Indigenous and non-indigenous nursing and allied health students.

School of Humanities

The School has several researchers working directly with Indigenous communities on Indigenous issues. These include several staff in Archaeology such as Dr Mark Moore (e.g. Narran Lakes project), Prof Martin Gibbs (Walcha project), Adj Assoc Prof Wendy Beck (Working Ancient Wetlands ARC project) and Adj Prof June Ross (Kimberley Rock Art ARC Project). As UNE’s students are regularly involved in the field components of these research projects, they assist in helping students to develop an understanding of and respect for Aboriginal traditional and contemporary culture, alongside the many unit offerings outlined above.

School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences
  • The School of BCSS is committed to increasing a diverse range of indigenous voices in units, both through readings and invitations to guest lecture in units.
  • Geography and Planning staff on behalf of the NSW Department of Planning and Environment are expected to provide planning training for a number of Local Land Councils.
  • Criminology staff at the school work in partnership with the management committee of the Armidale Neighborhood Centre which supports family violence indigenous women.
  • An adjunct Senior Lecturer in Linguistics, Margaret Sharpe, met as a member of the Yugambeh Language Advisory Committee at the Yugambeh Museum at Beenleigh, Qld, in May to finalise the Yugambeh language orthography, and plan what should be covered in a last semester 2017 introduction of the course in Prep classes in a few schools on the Gold Coast, the traditional country of the Yugambeh people.
All enrolments

Enrolment year

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Bachelor of Medical Science

      

1

Bachelor of Medicine

4

3

2

6

7

8

5

Graduate Diploma in Applied Anatomy by Dissection

 

1

2

2

   

Total

4

4

4

8

7

8

6

Commencing
 

Enrolment year

 

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Bachelor of Medical Science

      

1

Bachelor of Medicine

1

 

1

3

4

3

 

Graduate Diploma in Applied Anatomy by Dissection

 

1

2

2

   

Total

1

1

3

5

4

3

1

Acknowledgements

Oorala Aboriginal Centre would like to thank the following Directorates and Schools of The University of New England for their contribution to the preparation of the 2016 Indigenous Education Statement:

The following UNE directorates contributed to this statement:

  • Oorala Aboriginal Centre
  • Audit and Risk
  • Stewardship and Research Officer
  • UNE Marketing
  • Strategy & Planning
  • Research Services
  • Human Resource Services
  • Corporate Intelligence Unit
  • UNE Life (including SportUNE)
  • Dixson Library
  • Teaching and Learning Support (TALS)

The following UNE academic schools contributed to this statement:

  • School of Arts
  • School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences
  • School of Business
  • School of Education
  • School of Environmental and Rural Sciences
  • School of Health
  • School of Humanities
  • School of Law
  • School of Rural Medicine
  • School of Science and Technology

Gregory Davison
Director, Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Section 2: Expenditure of Indigenous Support Program Grant (Attachment 1)

Please use the financial acquittal template attached to report on the expenditure of your University’s ISP grant for 2016, noting that a breakdown of expenditure is required (e.g. salary and travel breakdown). Where ISP expenditure does not match the audited annual financial statements for the year ending 31 December 2016 provided under section 19-10 of Higher Education Support Act 2003, please provide reconciliation.

This ISP report is a legislated requirement, under the Higher Education Support Act 2003 –
Other Grants Guidelines (Education) 2008.

NB: The accessible content of the forms appears below, and the signed forms are found in TRIM.

Section 3: Higher education provider’s contact information

Please nominate contact officers for all policy and operational matters regarding your Indigenous Education Statement, including name(s), position title, phone number and email address.

Where your Indigenous Education Unit has been consulted in the development of this Indigenous Education Statement, please provide the contact details of the relevant staff member.

 University OfficerIndigenous Education Support Unit Officer
Name: Professor Annabelle Duncan Mr Gregory Davison
Position Title: Vice-Chancellor & CEO University of New England Director
Oorala Aboriginal Centre
Phone Number: (02) 6773 2004
(02) 6773 4071
(02) 6773 5824
(02) 6773 2008
Email: vc@une.edu.augdaviso2@une.edu.au;
cc: ooralamgt@une.edu.au

Section 4: Publication of the Statement

Following approval of the IES by PM&C, universities are to publish the current and the previous two IES on their website. The documents are required to be externally accessible to the public.