Achievement of National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Policy (AEP) Goals in 2015 and Plans For Future Years

Please provide evidence of:

  • strategies you have implemented which seek to achieve the AEP goals and your assessment of whether these strategies are working;
  • constraints on your ability to achieve the AEP goals; and
  • plans for future improvement of existing strategies or implementation of new strategies to meet each of the AEP goals relevant to higher education.

The AEP goals (paraphrased) relating to higher education are to:

  1. Establish effective arrangements for the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in educational decision-making.
  2. Increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples employed, as academic and non-academic staff in higher education institutions.
  3. Ensure equitable access of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to higher education.
  4. Achieve the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in higher education, at rates commensurate with those of all other Australians.
  5. Enable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to attain the same graduation rates from award courses in higher education as for other Australians.
  6. To provide all Australian students with an understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander traditional and contemporary cultures.
AEP Goal 1: Participation in educational decision-making

1. Establish effective arrangements for the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in educational decision-making.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

  • The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people involved in institutional governance and decision-making bodies and processes and the nature of their involvement, i.e. memberships on boards, committees etc.
  • If there is no Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander membership on key governance and decision making bodies, please provide an explanation.
  • The roles and responsibilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders within your institution.

The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people involved in institutional governance and decision-making bodies and processes and the nature of their involvement at UNE

Encouraging and increasing Indigenous representation within governing and decision-making bodies, such as the University of New England (UNE) Council, Academic Board and other University Committees, as well as in management positions, is a core focus for UNE. Organisational commitment to this is expressed in the Compact and operationalised through the UNE Regional Aboriginal Higher Education Strategy.

Effective participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on decision-making bodies and in decision-making processes as part of the institutional governance of the University is found within the following positions and the 2015 representation is set out below:

  • The UNE Council has two Aboriginal members:
    • Aboriginal student as the elected UNE Undergraduate Student Representative, and
    • Aboriginal member as a ministerial appointee.
  • The Infrastructure Committee of the UNE Council includes the Aboriginal ministerial Council appointee as a member
  • Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) is the University Ethics Committee which approves all research ethics applications related to research on human subjects. This Committee includes three places for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representatives who vet and approve all applications with Indigenous content, in accordance with NHMRC, ARC and related policies and legislation. These members have power of veto over all aspects of any Indigenous research applications from UNE and advise the Chair on all matters relating to the conduct of Indigenous research at UNE.
  • Directorship of the Oorala Aboriginal Centre
  • The role of the Indigenous Academic Advisor, Oorala
  • University Teaching and Learning Committee (previously known as Academic T&L Committee) (1): Indigenous Academic member of staff
  • Four Aboriginal staff members sit on UNE’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy Governance Committee.
  • The School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Science (BCSS) invited a local Aboriginal Clinical and Counselling Psychologist to be a member of the Clinical Psychology Advising Liaison Committee that meets twice yearly.
  • The School of Arts Strategic Plan 2012–2015 includes the objective “4. Promote improved student access to higher education opportunities from diverse groups and encourage social inclusiveness.” One of the strategies to achieve this objective is “4.4 Collaborate with Oorala on enhanced integration.” During 2015 the Head of School collaborated with the Director of Oorala and the Deputy Director of Research Services about the establishment of 4 designated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Creative Practice HDR Scholarships (which have been filled).
  • School of Law Advisory Board (1) Oorala Director as Indigenous Academic Advisor.
  • School of Law Teaching & Learning Committee (1) Oorala Director Oorala Indigenous Academic Advisor
  • Social Work External Advisory Committee (1) Oorala Indigenous Academic Advisor
  • Vice-Chancellor’s Executive Communication Day (previously known as VC’s Committee) (1) Oorala Indigenous Academic Advisor/Director Oorala
  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy Governance Committee (2) Oorala Indigenous Academic Advisor and UNE Aboriginal Employment Officer.
  • Council of Heads of School (1) Director, Oorala
  • Enrolment Steering Committee (1): Oorala Student Services Manager
  • Student Administration & Services Forums (1): Oorala Student Services Manager.
  • Expressions of interest were advertised in 2015 for permanent members of the University Teaching and Learning Committee from permanent and fixed-term academic staff who identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

In addition to the above, non-Indigenous Oorala staff represented the Centre as nominees to the following due to their professional roles:

  • School of Education Teaching and Learning Committee (1) Senior Lecturer, Oorala
  • Library Advisory Committee, Dixson Library (1): Lecturer
  • First-year Experience Committee (1): Lecturer
  • UNE’s WH&S Working Group, HR User Group and Finance User Group (1): Resource & Compliance Officer.
  • The University’s academic schools take advice from advisory committees with both internal and external representation (depending upon purpose) at the school, discipline or course level. This is designed to ensure that perspectives and needs of key stakeholders are included. For example, the School of Health consults and reviews with its External Advisory Committees on the development of nursing and counselling curricula; the relevant Nursing Committee includes Indigenous representation from UNE and the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses (CATSIN).

If there is no Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander membership on key governance and decision-making bodies, please provide an explanation.

In addition to the formal representation outlined above there are opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff to be members of other University committees, including the Academic Board. However, as staff are not required to identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, the representation will not be identified as such.

The roles and responsibilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders within UNE

The roles and responsibilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders at UNE is to provide advice and input on matters related to UNE’s governance, strategies, policies and procedures as a higher educational institution.

  • The two Aboriginal appointments to the UNE Council continued in 2015, being among the 17 members of the UNE Council who are responsible for the governance of the University and are involved in the decision-making and overseeing of UNE’s operations for the benefit of its students, staff, academic community and the wider community as a whole.
  • The role of the Director of the Oorala Aboriginal Centre includes leadership at UNE through involvement in committees and high level liaison with Schools and Directorates on matters and issues that relate to academic support and outcomes in recruitment, access, participation, retention and completion for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in higher education, as well as providing strategic direction for the Centre’s role in the University’s community and student engagement, academic programs and cultural competency. The Director’s role was vacant during most of 2015, with a new Director recruited in November.
  • The role of Indigenous Academic Advisor at Oorala Aboriginal Centre was established in 2015 for leadership on academic matters at Oorala, for the interim period whilst the Director’s position was vacant.
  • The role of Elder-in-Residence continued to represent Oorala and UNE in 2015. Local Aboriginal community leaders, including Oorala’s Elder-in-Residence, are invited by UNE schools and directorates to provide consultation and participation in protocols for official events, programs and projects, including Welcome to Country and incorporation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives.
  • A new Indigenous pre-graduation sashing ceremony for all Indigenous graduates has been adopted in the Autumn graduation season, involving participation by the Elder-in-Residence, Oorala Director and other staff and students.
  • The Vice-Chancellor’s Aboriginal Research Fellow appointed in 2013, who is an Aboriginal academic seconded from Oorala, continued through 2015 to advise on a number of UNE research projects.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff from Oorala and across the University are involved extensively in engaging with community groups in the region, providing valuable expertise to the University, gained through their academic and professional experience and community engagement. These staff provided input on UNE employment and student support matters.
  • The Aboriginal Employment Officer develops and maintains relationships with the community and represents UNE on government and community organisations and sits on the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy Governance Committee that oversees its implementation.
  • In 2015 the Indigenous Student Association continued to be active at UNE, progressing in its goal to advance Indigenous student representation on student and UNE committees.
  • Steve Widders, an Anaiwan elder, is an honorary patron of the School of Education. He provides advice to the Head of School, and is guest speaker at the first School meeting each year and on other significant occasions. An Oorala representative is invited to School meetings and has a seat on the School’s Teaching and Learning Committee.

Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s role in educational decision-making

The Director, Elder-in-Residence and other staff of Oorala, throughout 2015, maintained involvement in several groups engaging with the community and the higher education sector. The Director was also involved in consultation and decision-making at UNE through several University committees, boards and working parties, as listed above.

In the broader higher education sector Oorala represented UNE on:

  • The National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Consortium (NATSIHEC) (2): Oorala Director and Oorala Elder-in-Residence. The Indigenous Academic Advisor also attended during the interim period when the Oorala Director’s position was vacant.
  • The National Indigenous Elders Think Tank (1): Oorala Elder-in-Residence

Across the local community Oorala’s participation by Aboriginal staff included:

  • Gayinyaga Aboriginal Advisory Committee (1)
  • Local Armidale lnter-agency Committee (1)
  • East Armidale Community Garden Project (2)
  • Armidale Clontarf Academy Awards Night (2)
  • Regular informal discussions between Oorala staff and key members of the local Aboriginal community.
AEP Goal 2: ATSI staff numbers

2. Increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff employed as academic and non-academic staff in higher education institutions.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

  • An outline of your current Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy including details on its current status, who has responsibility for its implementation, how is progress measured, how and when is progress reviewed or evaluated.
  • Information on your strategies for increasing numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff employed at your University. (Please provide a link to your Employment statement).
  • The number of Indigenous-specific positions at your University, detailed by occupation and level.
  • The current number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff at your University and their roles across the University (including numbers in academic and non-academic roles, and by level).

An outline of UNE’s current Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy including details on its current status, who has responsibility for its implementation, how is progress measured, how and when is progress reviewed or evaluated

UNE identifies attracting and retaining Indigenous staff as a major priority in its Mission-based Compact and this is echoed in the University of New England Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy 2013–2018.

The UNE Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy 2013–2018 was developed to provide a platform for increasing employment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples within UNE with a strong focus on recruitment, employment retention and career development for current and future staff of UNE. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy 2013–2018 also guides the development of strategies that target appropriate workplace culture and practices, employment opportunities, career development plans and academic career paths, for both staff and students. The Provost and Deputy Vice-Chancellor chair the ATSI Employment Strategy Governance Committee that provides advice to the Vice-Chancellor in the oversight of the implementation of the strategy.

The strategy was authored by the Aboriginal Employment Officer in consultation with Human Resource Services, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, local community representatives, the Director of Oorala Aboriginal Centre and UNE senior staff.

The Employment Strategy identifies objectives and initiatives aimed at increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment across all UNE Schools and Directorates through:

  • Community partnerships – strengthening relationships between the community and UNE.
  • Career development – building meaningful career paths for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff.
  • Becoming a good employer – building understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and appropriate workforce management practices.
  • Attracting and retaining – increasing meaningful employment options for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Key objectives are:

  • Achieving ongoing representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at UNE.
  • Identifying and introducing specific strategies to support the attraction of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander professional and academic staff.
  • Establishing and promoting career development options for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees.

Whilst overall responsibility for the strategy’s implementation rests with the Provost and Deputy Vice-Chancellor the University expectation is that all managers and staff will support its implementation. A Governance Committee, chaired by the Provost and Deputy Vice-Chancellor, oversees the implementation of the Strategy and comprises UNE representatives from Schools, Directorates, unions, and other members are co-opted as required. Local Aboriginal Elders and community representatives from local organisations are engaged through the Armidale Aboriginal Interagency Committee in a consultative capacity to support the governance committee’s implementation of the Strategy.

The Committee receives quarterly reports on the Strategy’s progress through its UNE representatives and evaluation of the Strategy by HR Services is based on progress of each activity, with feedback and data also collated for annual reporting.

The University continues to implement the strategies outlined in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 2013–2018 strategy. During the last twelve months there have been fluctuations in employment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with retention presenting as an issue.

The Employment Strategy contains aspirational targets to increase employees in continuing positions. In 2016 the University is devolving these targets to Schools and Directorates to ensure shared accountability.

Strategies for increasing numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff employed at UNE (UNE’s ATSI Employment Strategy)

During 2014–2015 the Employment Strategy was refocused to concentrate on the attraction and retention of Aboriginal people into both Professional and Academic roles through “growing our own”.

The following actions have been taken to increase the employment of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples in accordance with the Employment Strategy:

  • The School of Arts in collaboration with Research Services have established and awarded four PhD Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scholarships. The scholarship holders have the opportunity to develop academic careers within the University. Another successful example is the creation of an additional academic role (Pre-Doctoral Fellow in Law) in the UNE School of Law to be filled in June 2015.
  • The BCSS School engaged a local Indigenous Psychologist to provide training for psychology students and to work closely with the Deputy Head of School and Director of the Psychology Clinical Program. A criminology research group examining Indigenous Adult Education in Bourke NSW engaged an Indigenous research assistant.
  • The School of Arts employed a casual ATSI Research Assistant to assist with the research project “Nourishing Culture and Developing Social Capital in a Community Garden. This project is led by Dr Katherine Wright, postdoctoral research fellow.
  • A pilot Cultural Immersion program was conducted in September 2015 and six programs have been offered to date [34 staff completed this course in 2015]. The program has been attended by Senior Executives and Senior Managers of the University. We will continue to offer this program to staff and supervisors to improve cultural competency in engaging with students and staff.
  • An Aboriginal lecturer in the School of Rural Medicine and an Aboriginal Support Officer were appointed to support the School’s ATSI students and to develop and run the Kruki Summer School. These short-term contract appointments were funded by a Higher Education Participation and Partnership (HEPP) grant from the Australian Government Department of Education and Training. Pending continuation of funding, the School of Rural Medicine will continue to employ Ms Shipley in 2016 to assist with delivering the Indigenous Health curriculum of the Joint Medical Program (JMP) (a joint program with the University of Newcastle) and to increase engagement with Indigenous students enrolled in the JMP at UNE.
  • The ATSI Employment Strategy is progressing well in the School of Law, with staff numbers ahead of projected targets. An additional academic role (Pre-Doctoral Fellow in Law) was filled in May 2015.
  • Establishment of a ‘buddying’ program for newly appointed Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander employees to assist with the on-boarding process has commenced. Culturally appropriate buddies are sourced from existing UNE staff.
  • A career development program has been developed and offered to existing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff. In response to feedback the direction of this initiative has now shifted to encouraging participation in leadership and development programs offered to all UNE staff and supervisors.
  • Facilitating secondments for current Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff to broaden their view of career opportunities within the University whilst enhancing and promoting their skills.
  • Engagement with local employment providers has commenced to enlist their support in pre-employment initiatives.

The strategy is on the UNE webpage, at a link accessible to UNE and the public via ‘Information for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community’ at: http://www.une.edu.au/staff-current/working/equity/atsi-emplyment/aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-employment-strategy

The number of Indigenous-specific positions at UNE, detailed by occupation and level

Table 1a: Indigenous-specific permanent positions

Faculty/Institute/Section

Academic/Non-Academic

Position title

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic (Contract)

Director (Executive)

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Elder-in-Residence, HEO7A

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Student Services Administrative Assistant, HEO4

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Administrative Assistant, HEO4

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Student Services Officer, HEO6

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Student Services Manager, HEO7

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Special Projects Officer, HEO6

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic

Associate Lecturer, ATA

School of Humanities – History

Academic

Lecturer, ATB

Human Resource Services

Non-Academic

Aboriginal Employment Officer, HEO7

Student Administration and Services

Non-Academic

Customer Service Officer, HEO4

Total

11

 

Table 1b: Indigenous-specific fixed-term positions

Table 1b: Indigenous-specific fixed-term positions

Faculty/Institute/Section

Academic/
Non-Academic

Position title

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Student Service Officer – Retention, HEO6

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic

Indigenous Academic Advisor, ATD

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

PACES Community Outreach Officer (Moree), HEO6

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

PACES Community Outreach Officer (Armidale), HEO6

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Admin. Assistant, HEO4

Deputy Vice-Chancellor’s Office

Academic

Vice Chancellor's ATSI Research Fellowship, ATB

School of Rural Medicine

Non-Academic

Student Support Officer (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander), HEO4

School of Rural Medicine

Academic

Lecturer (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander), ATB

School of Law

Academic

Pre-Doctoral Fellowship in Law, ARA

Total

9

Table 2: Indigenous-specific Casual positions

Table 2: Indigenous-specific Casual positions

Faculty/Institute/Section

Academic/Non-Academic

Position title

Arts

Non-academic

Research Assistant to assist with the research project, “Nourishing Culture and Developing Social Capital in a Community Garden.

Total

Nil

 

Compared to 2014 there was an increase of 9 in the number of Indigenous-specific positions at UNE in 2015.

The current number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff at UNE and their roles across the University (including numbers in academic and non-academic roles, and by level)

Table 3: Current ATSI staff at UNE

Faculty/Institute/Section

Academic/Non-Academic

Position title

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic (Contract)

Director, (Executive)

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Student Services Manager, HEO7

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Student Services Officer, HEO6

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Elder-in-Residence, HEO7A

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic (fixed term and casual)

Associate Lecturer, ATA and Academic Mentor (CA)

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic

Indigenous Academic Advisor, ATD

Oorala Aboriginal Centre and Human Resource Services

Non-Academic

Admin. Assistant, HEO4 (Oorala) and HR Services Assistant, HEO4 (HRS secondment)

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

Student Services Admin. Assistant, HEO4

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

PACES Outreach Officer (Armidale), HEO6

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic

PACES Outreach Officer (Moree), HEO6

School of Humanities – History

Academic

Lecturer, ATB

School of Science & Technology

Non-Academic

Admin. Assistant, HEO4

School of Rural Medicine & Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic (fixed term and casual)

Student Support Officer, HEO4, (Rural Medicine) and Admin. Assistant, Casual General, HEO 4 (Oorala)

School of Law

Academic

Pre Doctoral Fellowship in Law, ARA

Deputy Vice-Chancellor's Office

Academic

Vice-Chancellor’s Aboriginal Research Fellowship (ARB)

IT – Client Services

Non-Academic

Client Services Officer, HEO5

Student Administration & Services

Non-Academic

Admin. Assistant (Customer Service Officer), HEO4

Student Administration & Services

Non-Academic

Admin. Assistant (Customer Service Officer), HEO4

University Library Information Resources

Non-Academic

Library Assistant, HEO4

Yarm Gwanga Child Care Centre

Non-Academic

Trained Child Care Worker, HEO4

School of Environmental & Rural Science

Non-Academic

Technical Assistant, HEO2

School of Environmental & Rural Science

Non-Academic

Technical Assistant, HEO3

School of Environmental & Rural Science

Non-Academic

Technical Assistant, HEO3

School of Environmental & Rural Science

Non-Academic

Laboratory Assistant, HEO2

Human Resource Services and School of Arts

Non-Academic

Aboriginal Employment Officer, HEO7* and Casual General, HEO6*

Facilities Management Services – Operations

Non-Academic

Plumber, HEO4

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic (casual)

Correctional Centre Tutor, (CA1)

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic (casual)

Academic (CA) and ITAS Tutor (CA)

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic (casual)

Academic (CA) and ITAS Tutor (CA)

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic (casual)

ITAS Tutor (CA)

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic (casual)

ITAS Tutor (CA)

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic (casual) and Non-Academic (casual)

ITAS Tutor (CA) and Student Casual HEO Student Level 1

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic (casual) and Non-Academic (casual)

ITAS Tutor (CA) and Student Casual HEO Student Level 1

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic (casual)

Senior Project Officer, HEO7

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic (casual and fixed term)

Student Services Officer (Retention), HEO6 and Casual General, HEO6

Oorala Aboriginal Centre and School of Rural Medicine

Non-Academic (casual) and

Academic (fixed term)

Casual General, HEO6 (Oorala) and Lecturer, ATB (Rural Medicine)

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic (casual and fixed term)

Casual General, HEO4, and PACES Outreach Officer (Armidale), HEO6

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic (casual and fixed term)

Casual General HEO4 and Admin. Assistant, HEO4

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Non-Academic (casual)

Student Casual, HEO Student Level 2

Oorala Aboriginal Centre, School of Education and Dixson Library

Academic (casual) and
Non-Academic (casual)

1 staff member employed in multiple positions:

  • ITAS Tutor, Casual Academic (workshops) (Oorala)
  • Casual General, HEO5 (Education)
  • Student Casual, HEO Student Level 1 (Oorala) and Level 2 (Library)

Oorala Aboriginal Centre and School of Rural Medicine

Academic (casual) and Non-Academic (casual)

ITAS Tutor (Academic) and Casual General Student 1 (Oorala)

Casual General, HEO2 (Rural Medicine)

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Academic (casual) and Non-Academic (casual)

ITAS Tutor (CA) and Student Casual, HEO Student Level 1

Research Services

Non-Academic (casual)

Casual General, HEO6

Facilities Management Services – Operations

Non-Academic (casual)

Casual General, HEO3

School of Behavioural, Cognitive & Social Science and Environmental & Rural Science

Non-Academic (casual and fixed term)

Casual General, HEO4 (BCSS), Casual General, HEO5 and Project Officer, HEO5 (ERS)

Total

45

 

Data provided by UNE Human Resources.

The above data indicates an increase of 14 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff employed at UNE, compared to 2014.

In addition to the above staff, 6 student casuals were employed by Oorala (Student Casual, HEO Student Level 1).

AEP Goal 3: Equitable access to higher education

3. Ensure equitable access of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to higher education.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

  • Commencing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student numbers for 2015 (access rate) as compared to 2014 (please provide an all student comparison).
  • Programs run, by the University, to improve access by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.
  • Details on outreach activities and their effectiveness, in attracting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. (See table below).
  • Details of Indigenous-specific and other scholarships offered by your University.
    (See table below).
  • Promotion of scholarships to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and take-up rates, including reasons for low take-up of available scholarships.
  • Indigenous Education/Support Unit’s role.

UNE identifies Indigenous access, participation and retention in higher education as a long-term strategic priority and is reflected in UNE’s Mission-based Compact 2014–2016. The provision of alternative entry pathways to UNE for ATSI students has proven to be a successful strategy to improve access, with the number of commencing ATSI students growing by 27% in 2014, compared to 2% over the same period in the non-ATSI domestic population. Retention and completion remain the focus for ongoing improvement activity and UNE acknowledges that improving access to higher education for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates will require a sustained University-wide commitment to implement short, medium and long-term priorities as outlined in UNE’s Strategic Plan 2011–2015 and it subordinate Teaching and Learning Plan 2012–2015 and Research Plan 2012–2015, which include the following strategies.

  • Provide effective academic scaffolding and support services.
  • Innovate in the recruitment and retention of regional, remote and ATSI students and staff, particularly within the New England region.
  • Employ innovative recruitment and retention activities aimed at regional, remote and Indigenous students, particularly within the New England region.
  • Develop innovative partnerships focused on students from low SES areas and Indigenous students (e.g. alternative entry pathways, scholarships, strategic courses) that build capacity in these students and their communities.
  • Ensure our graduate attributes promote social and cultural understanding including an appreciation of Indigenous culture and history.
  • Establish alternative pathways and academic support programs that address Indigenous and low SES student participation in higher degree programs.

During 2015 UNE developed its new Strategic Plan 2016–2020 in consultation with academic and directorate areas of the University and this Plan is currently being implemented.

In addition, in 2013 UNE developed a Regional Aboriginal Higher Education Strategy (RAHES) which focuses on meeting two discrete but equally important strategic aims of the University:

  • innovate in the recruitment of regional, remote and ATSI students, particularly within the New England region, and
  • support collaboration between education providers to ensure a coordinated approach to engaging with Aboriginal communities to assist in building educational aspiration, relevant pathways to higher education and rates of retention and completion of higher education by Aboriginal students.

During 2015 The Arts School developed three diploma courses that could be lead into a relevant Bachelor degree: Diploma in Music Skills, Diploma in Music Technology, and Diploma in Professional Communication. It is hoped that these can be used as a pathway to Bachelor-level study.

Commencing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students
(all student comparison access rate, 2014–2015)

Table 4: Commencing ATSI students

Type of student

2014

2015

% increase

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

286

364

27%

Non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (Domestic students only)

8,545

8,693

2%

Note: The number reported for 2014 in this report will not match that reported in the 2014 report for two reasons:

  1. This year the number of persons has been reported rather than the number of enrolments, it was felt that this more closely represents the number of students as a student may have two enrolments in one year.
  2. Timing differences in reporting result in small changes to reportable numbers due to administrative action.
Table 5: Changes in commencing students 2014-2015

Commencing students and enrolments

2014

2015

% increase

Total commencing on campus ATSI students (including enabling programs)

77

90

17%

Total commencing off campus ATSI students (including enabling programs)

224

301

34%

ATSI enrolments in TRACKS course

22

52

236%

ATSI enrolments in Bachelor of Arts

11

21

90%

ATSI enrolments in Bachelor of Social Work

7

13

86%

ATSI enrolments in Bachelor of Education (Early Childhood Education)

0

9

900%

ATSI enrolments in Bachelor of Biomedical Science

7

13

86%

Table 6: Total Indigenous students as a percentage of total student numbers at UNE
Mode of Study

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Off campus/External

1.9%

2.2%

2.4%

2.4%

2.4%

2.9%

On campus/Internal

2.2%

2.7%

2.9%

3.0%

3.2%

3.6%

Total

2.0%

2.3%

2.5%

2.5%

2.6%

3.0%

While various Schools and total commencing numbers show some volatility from year to year, the overall situation at UNE over the last five years has seen steadily increasing numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students as a percentage of all students.

Programs run by UNE to improve access by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

The provision of alternative entry pathways is a significant component of UNE’s current and successful approach to ensuring Indigenous student access, which includes a flexible approach to entry requirements through Oorala’s Direct Entry (ISP) and TRACKS Programs. UNE’s sub-degree undergraduate programs also play a valuable role as qualifications requiring shorter duration of study, which also offer pathways into further study at the Bachelors level. This approach has resulted in consistently excellent outcomes, with UNE meeting enrolment targets in successive years. However, UNE has identified potential for expansion of Diploma level programs to include more content with Indigenous knowledge and perspectives.

Table 7: Programs run by UNE in 2015 to improve access for ATSI students

Program Name

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

TRACKS Tertiary Preparation Program

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants (18 years and over)

Ongoing alternative entry program offered on campus and online through Oorala; Tertiary preparation assists Indigenous students to develop their study skills and their transition to mainstream UNE courses (TRACKS includes five core TRAX units and one undergraduate unit).

Significant increases in enrolments for 2015. (See data under ‘Oorala’s Role – Access Programs’ on page 19.)

TAFE link to TRACKS program

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander TAFE students

Throughout 2015 Oorala continued to develop a partnership with New England TAFE to offer a pathway into the TRACKS Program. Oorala received HEPP funding in late 2014 for this program which continued in 2015. This cross-sectorial partnership offers students a first step towards university learning as well as specific foundational learning support to ensure readiness for the university learning experience. It aims to enable a greater number of Aboriginal people in the New England region to consider university study.

Seven TAFE students participated across Trimester 1 & 2, 2015 and the Student Support Mentor (Aboriginal Academic) was employed by Oorala throughout the project to mentor students over both trimesters.  After Trimester 1, one student chose to join the TRACKS.

Two other participants successfully completed their Certificate IV whilst participating in our program across Trimester 2, and have now been admitted to undergraduate programs at UNE commencing in Trimester 1, 2016.

Internal Selection Program

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants (18 years and over)

Ongoing alternative entry program offered on campus through Oorala; Testing and assessment for UNE course admission; applicants are either recommended for admission to their selected UNE degree or alternatively the TRACKS Program or other tertiary study options

See data under ‘Oorala’s Role – Access Programs’

Place-based Aboriginal Community Engagement Strategy (PACES)

ATSI School Children and Community members

Designed to foster community relationships and build aspirations for university study in communities within the New England/North West region through the training and employment of Community Engagement Officers, to promote higher education and provide outreach support.

  • Discussions held with school principals in target communities to   develop improved strategies to improve ATSI students access to UNE and to   promote AIME and Youth Leadership Program.
  • Work undertaken with UNE Marketing re arranging campus visits by   Armidale schools to develop aspirations by students in Years 7–11 to apply   for UNE.
  • Exhibited with Oorala’s Student Support team at the 2015 Koori   Knockout in Dubbo to actively promote UNE courses, entry pathways, services   and support, including scholarships. Over 400 people visited the Oorala stall   during the three-day event.
  • Connecting with community organisations (Armidale Council,   Aboriginal Lands Council, Aboriginal Legal Service, Aboriginal Employment   Officer at Best Employment, Homes North, the Aboriginal Liaison Officers at the   Attorney General’s Department, TAFE NSW and others) to improve Oorala’s   relationships with the Indigenous community.
  • Development of ATSI-specific promotional materials targeting   teaching, nursing, and medicine.

UNE Pathways Enabling Course

All applicants who do not meet standard entry requirements for UNE undergraduate courses and have not successfully completed any part of a university course.

Ongoing enabling program offered online through UNE. It prepares students for admission to UNE undergraduate courses. Pathways includes two foundation units and two undergraduate units, with mentoring and additional tutorial support.

Commencing enrolments of Indigenous students in UNE’s Pathways Enabling Course were 31 in 2014 and the same number in 2015.

MOU with Northern Region Forum

NSW north and north-west Aboriginal communities

In August 2015 UNE signed a Memorandum of Understanding with The Northern Region Forum – an umbrella group representing 14 local Aboriginal Land Councils – to promote access to education for local Aboriginal people.

A series of school visits and meetings with communities were scheduled for 2016 and future years.

‘Miroma Bunbilla’ Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Pre-entry to Medicine Program

New Indigenous applicants for Joint Medical Program selecting enrolment at University of Newcastle or UNE

Eligible Indigenous applicants attend one-week Program for Pre-Entry to Medicine, to gain an understanding of the commitment required to complete the medical program, and the learning and teaching methods included in the group-based learning environment. Run by Wollotuka Institute, University of Newcastle.

Involvement of Oorala Student Support staff with Wollotuka in the Program; 4 Indigenous students were admitted to commence JMP at UNE in 2015

Kruki Summer School

New Indigenous applicants to the Joint Medical Program selecting enrolment at University of Newcastle or UNE

Eligible Indigenous applicants attend one-week program for pre-entry to medicine (testing, interviews, assessments) run by Wollotuka Institute, University of Newcastle. The Director of Oorala and Student Support staff attended the Miroma Bunbilla program held on 2015. From 2016, all students participating in the Miroma Bunbilla program will travel to Armidale and spend a day at UNE.

Three students with Indigenous background have commenced their first year medical training at UNE in 2016.

Vice-Chancellor’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Fellowship Scheme

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates

Inaugural Aboriginal Research Fellowship which commenced under this scheme for 2013-2016 continued in 2015.

Level A ‘Pre-Doc’ Fellow position, established in 2014, (School of Law, three-year research fellowship for PhD candidate, with 0.5 teaching load).

Continuation of inaugural fellowship; School of Law Fellow commenced in 2015

ATSI Creative Practice Scholars Program

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates

UNE School of Arts is using its strong creative practice profile as a vehicle to develop deep links and knowledge-sharing with Indigenous scholars

4 HDR scholarships were offered and accepted in 2015 (2 Masters and 2 PhD candidates)

Diploma of Business

All students including Indigenous students

Students have option to undertake 8 Humanities units with a specific Indigenous focus (equating to an Indigenous Organisation Management major) that may lead into Bachelor of Business

Two Indigenous students enrolled in Dip Business in 2015 and 2 to date in 2016. Targeted promotion required.

GRASS Industry Placement Scholarship

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups, rural and other remote and low-socio economic rural and remote students.

The UNE GRASS Industry Placement Scholarship showcases to Years 11 and 12 students, the broad range of exciting science-based careers that support primary industries. Full Industry Placement Scholarship offerings are made following an application, interview and after working with students at the camp.

More students from these areas and backgrounds are encouraged to attend University and once they have completed their education, they are more likely to take this knowledge back to their communities.

Table 8: Total ATSI students in UNE Pathways Enabling Course
 

Total enrolments

Commencing enrolments

 

2014

2015

2014

2015

Pathways Enabling Course

36

43

31

31

Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s role – Access programs

Oorala offers alternative entry programs specifically for Indigenous people: the Internal Selection Program (ISP) and the TRACKS Tertiary Preparation Program (TRACKS). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students receive advice through Student Services and Oorala to choose the access programs that are most appropriate to their prior learning and educational goals. Through Oorala's program activities, UNE academic staff also offer academic advice relevant to students' areas of interest.

In ISP, participating applicants for admission are assessed by Oorala to gain entry to a UNE course. In 2015, six prospective students participated in the ISP program for admission to commence undergraduate study in Trimesters 1 and 2, 2015, and Trimester 1, 2016. All of these applicants were subsequently successful in admission to UNE undergraduate courses.

In 2015 there were a total of 62 students enrolled in Oorala's TRACKS program, comprising 52 commencing and 10 continuing students. Twenty-four of these students were enrolled on-campus and 38 enrolled off campus. Of the 62 students enrolled in 2015, thirteen successfully completed TRACKS. Eight of these students progressed to study in UNE undergraduate courses for 2015 and two enrolled at another institution. Twenty-one students are continuing the course in 2015.

Table 9: Enrolments in Oorala's TRACKS Program, 2010-2015

TRACKS enrolments

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

On campus

8

15

14

14

12

24

Off campus

22

35

34

24

21

38

Total

30

50

48

38

33

62

Oorala's further initiatives during 2015 to improve access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students at UNE included:

  • 'Aboriginal Resilience and the Arts' has been listed as an elective undergraduate unit in the TRACKS Program for students interested in arts and media disciplines. It provides TRACKS students with the opportunity to transition into undergraduate studies.
  • Support mechanisms available through Oorala and UNE for TRACKS students were reviewed at the end of 2015 and strategies developed to strengthen effectiveness of services, to improve retention and progress into undergraduate courses. These included tutorial support sessions through Oorala's Student Support Team, starting in trimester 1 2016. So far 21 students have taken up this opportunity.
  • The TAFE/TRACKS Pathway program saw a total of 7 students participating across Trimester 1 & 2, 2015. After Trimester 1, one student chose to join the TRACKS program rather than continuing at TAFE to gain his Certificate IV. This student is aiming to complete TRACKS at the end of Trimester 3, 2015, and intends to apply for admission to a Bachelor of Languages in 2016.
  • Two other participants successfully completed their Certificate IV whilst participating in the TRACKS program across Trimester 2 and have now been admitted to undergraduate programs at UNE (Bachelor of Criminology and Bachelor of Nursing) commencing in Trimester 1, 2016. Oorala was again successful in attracting funding from the UNE VC’s Scholars program to provide high achieving undergraduate students an opportunity to interact and mentor TRACKS students. Four scholars have taken up this opportunity.
  • The successful Pre-Orientation Program (POP) for TRACKS students continued in 2015. This was linked with more support such as mentoring through the VC’s Scholars program, to increase its effectiveness in early student engagement. Forty TRACKS students studying on-line or on-campus attended the pre-orientation programs run at the beginning of all three trimesters.
  • Oorala staff contributed to the design and implementation of UNE’s new online admission system, resulting in a streamlined process for TRACKS admissions. This contributed positively to the significant increase in applications to the program. All Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants can now also request referral to the Oorala Centre via UNE’s Student Relationship Management system.

UNE’s outreach activities and their effectiveness, in attracting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

During 2015 UNE was involved in a number of community projects that would assist in generating aspiration for higher education. These outreach programs are aimed at addressing specific areas of community need, with the potential for participants to see further possibilities after achieving success in higher education. The approaches are either a natural extension of UNE academic programs or research, or making use of current UNE facilities.

The UNE School of Law is also represented (through the Pre-Doctoral Fellow) on the National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network (NIRAKN), funded by the Australian Research Council. Through NIRAKN the Pre-doctoral fellow is engaged in a number of capacity building activities to support Indigenous research and academic professional development.

The School of Law hosts the Australian Centre for Agriculture and Law (ACAL), which is involved in a number of collaborative research projects with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. ACAL appointed Jack Beetson as an Adjunct Professor to facilitate its Indigenous social justice work and has collaborated with researchers from other universities in Australia and the USA around these issues.

Table 10: UNE 2015 HEPP projects

Title

Target audience

Description

Outcomes

Schools & University Connect

Low socio-economic school students in north and north-west NSW

The project has collaborated across project component areas and across government sectors to introduce social work students in schools to support teachers in addressing some of the well-recognised underlying social determinants in education, health, housing and employment which contribute to the inhibition of educational outcomes for students from low SES backgrounds.

A very well received Schools and University Connect Project conference at Coffs Harbour presented the project’s outcomes over the year to over 80 delegates from schools’ senior managers across our project’s footprint.

Speaking of Sacred Ground: Aboriginal Cemeteries in Walcha

Aboriginal community in Walcha

A partnership between local Aboriginal people in Walcha and UNE to preserve local Aboriginal histories in formats and places that are accessible for future generations. UNE hopes the project will build a relationship between the Walcha community, youth and Elders, and encourage Aboriginal people to consider undertaking historical studies at university.

32 interviews with community Elders, assisted by young people, to capture oral histories and memories of the cemeteries at Walcha, Summervale, Woolbrook and Ingleba. These interviews have been preserved in their entirety, and recorded on CDs as well as in MP3 formats. Together they form a library of resources for future generations.

The Project Coordinator has enrolled in the Bachelor of Historical Inquiry at UNE, and two of the participants undertaking the HSC this year and next, are also intending to enrol in the Bachelor of Historical Inquiry in 2017 and 2018.

Table 11: 2015 outreach activities

Table 11: 2015 outreach activities
Outreach activity Target audience Outline of Program Outcome
Elder-in-Residence Program Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples Oorala Elder-in-Residence has advisory role to Oorala and UNE on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student and community engagement and protocols Elder-in-Residence involved in Oorala and official UNE functions, community networks; representation on key committees and other groups

Increased Oorala involvement with local Elders’ groups

Implementation of the QuickSmart program in schools, prisons and remote workplaces Educationally disadvantaged groups who are experiencing learning problems or delays and, hence, not achieving their academic potential (see simerr.une.edu.au/quicksmart)

The QuickSmart program is a second-chance responsive small-group intervention that aims to develop fluent (Quick) and efficient (Smart) processing and understanding. QuickSmart uses research-based instructional approaches to support the learning of persistently low-achieving at-risk learners so that they are more actively and successfully engaged and prepared for further learning and eventually employment.

Independent (federal, state-wide or standardised tests) assessments gathered from QuickSmart and comparison students over fifteen years consistently show that Indigenous and non-Indigenous QuickSmart students have made substantial academic improvement. These gains are typically maintained and enhanced after the completion of the program.

Community Garden project

Open

The Community Garden project, led by Dr Katherine Wright, and supported by the School of Arts, ran a number of community engagement events in 2015. These included:

  • Open Day in May, A Public Conversation with Frances Bodkin in   August;
  • A public lecture in November “Aboriginal Astronomy: Stories,   Science and the Stars” presented by William Stevens, Aboriginal Astronomer at   the Sydney Observatory.

Both events were well attended.

Provided public access to novel aspects of Aboriginal culture.

1 Deadly Step

Aboriginal families

1-day health event where Aboriginal families can learn about preventing and managing chronic disease. 1 Deadly Step includes working with local services to put on a rugby league themed community event featuring live entertainment, appearances by Aboriginal NRL stars, skills games for the kids and health/community information stall holders. Community members can go through a series of screening Stages and receive a free 1 Deadly Step jersey after speaking with a medical professional about their results.

Two medical students volunteered with other JMP students from Tamworth. This is now a regular event on the Year4 student calendar. Offers students valuable experience in liaising directly with Aboriginal community in discussing Aboriginal health issues. Offers medical health prevention and screening for Aboriginal community.

Teddy Bear Doctors

Young primary school children

The School identifies local schools (including Minimbah, Rocky River with high proportion of indigenous students) to discuss health issues using students own teddy bears as the focus. Pediatrician accompanied by several Year 4 students visit and enjoy a few hours talking with students about problems or health issues they relay through their teddy bear.

Medical students learn communication skills with young children. Young indigenous children learn to talk about health issues with health practitioners. Relationship with schools opens doors to more visits and identification of children with aspirations towards studying in health related areas.

Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s Role – Outreach activities

2015 was another busy year for the Student Support Team in various areas from supporting our current Internal and External students to working with schools and communities in our local area and further afield to provide a better understanding about The Oorala Aboriginal Centre the Alternative Pathways and support we provide, and about the University Of New England. We have worked very hard with our current students on and off campus as well as the schools and communities to enhance community engagement and to build that relationship and trust with them.

The aims of all our events, career expo’s, community and schools visits is to inform and improve educational opportunities for Aboriginal people, to engage and support with retention issues with our current students , communities, schools and organisations about future studies.

During 2015 we have worked with various schools from our local area to schools in the northern part of the state, they are as follows:

School visits

Tamworth High School, Oxley High School
Moree Secondary College
Moree Secondary College (Sista Speak)
New England Girls School (met with parents)
Armidale High School (Clontarf boys group)
Lightning Ridge Central School (NAIDOC celebrations and Career Expo)
O’Connor Catholic College
Nambucca Heads High School
Macksville High School
Toormina High School
Orara High School
Walcha Central School
Tenterfield High School
Guyra Central School
Duval High School
Coonamble Central School
Moree Primary
Mungindi Central School
Boggabilla Central School
Toomelah Primary School
McIntyre High School
Ashford High School
Stellar Project (Maclean High, Grafton High, South Grafton High & McCauley Catholic College).

We also had a number of schools speak to us about working together for their students in the future:
Goodooga Central School
Walget Central School
Coonamble Central School
Woolgoolga High School
Bellingen High School
Dorrigo High School
Coffs Harbour High School
South Grafton High School

Presentations

We made several presentations in 2015 to promote the Oorala Aboriginal Centre to the following organisations

  • Smith Family – Tamworth (working with various schools from the Tamworth region)
  • Stellar Project – Clarence Valley (Working with schools from the Clarence low socio- ecomics areas, kids from year 8 & 9. Grafton, South Grafton, McCauley Catholic College Grafton and Maclean High School)
  • Career Advisors Summit UNE Campus, to present to all Career advisors about Alternative Pathways for Aboriginal students, and the support that Oorala provides here at UNE. Career advisors came from all over the State.
  • University Community Connect Conference – Coffs Harbour (Jim White) Principals, Career Advisors, Social Workers in schools, and executive staff.
  • Schools and Community Connect Forum, on Campus (Jim White) Aboriginal Education Officers Armidale, Inverell, Ashford, Guyra, Walcha and Uralla.
  • Myall Creek Memorial Site: With Liz Taylor UNE (Pace Officer) and Moree Secondary College Students for NAIDOC.
  • O’Connor Catholic College NAIDOC flag raising
  • Armidale High School Clontarf employment Day
  • Armidale High Well-being Day.
Expos

We have also attended Career Expo’s throughout the state, we chose these expo’s due to the amount of Aboriginal Students we know are in these areas and in these schools. Throughout the years we have noticed that the numbers have fallen in regards to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students attending these events due to various reasons, but these expo’s had a great turn up of Aboriginal students. When possible depending on UNE School Liaison Team work load we work side by side with them at various expo’s throughout the year.

Forbes & Dubbo- May

In Forbes this career expo was held at Red Bend Catholic College this school, this school is a boarding school and the majority of the Aboriginal students are borders from far western NSW. In Dubbo the career expo was held at Dubbo Senior College.

We hadn’t been to these expo’s in a quiet a few years due to restraints and the belief that we were intruding on other Universities captured areas, this is a misinformed thought as we know students will choose a University that suits their needs not what is closes to home. On this trip we communicated between 100 to 150 students who years ranged from Yr 7 to Yr 12, we spoke to them about University Degree’s, pathways not only Oorala’s but Principal recommendation and the support here at UNE, we also spoke to Career Advisors, AEO and community people.

Tamworth Expo - May

Unfortunately we didn’t get here this year, but this is a great expo for our local schools as this is the only career expo held in the region. (We will be attending this next year).

Coastal Run Lismore to Taree – July

This expo runs over 4 days from Lismore to Taree, this is a huge four-day event where schools come together at certain areas of the Far North Coast, North Coast and Mid-North Coast to attend these expo’s. At these expo’s we spoke to roughly 200 Aboriginal Students.

Lismore

Lismore Trinity Catholic College

Other expos

Coffs Harbour Senior Campus

Camden Haven High School

Chatham High School (Taree)

Youth Experience Expo UNE Lazenby Hall

2015 Aboriginal Knockout Dubbo

The majorities of these schools are in the North West Region of the state and are in low socio-economic areas, and in the University of New England Catchment area. Some of these schools are in very remote areas; we have traveled to other areas of the state when we have been invited to attend their events. We know that from liaising with community members and schools that the information and opportunities can be scare in these areas due to the remoteness and lack of resources. Since the funding cost of years ago for example (Croc Festival, Deadly Days, Vibe Alive just to name a few) many Universities and organisations don’t go to these places, we have noticed that the Oorala Aboriginal Centre is one of the only Aboriginal Units that go to career expo’s unless they are specifically for Aboriginal students.

Due to the financial burdens on these schools and due to the distances between some of these remote communities traveling hundreds of kilometers to attend a career expo isn’t viable so once again they are not informed and they miss out.

By traveling to these communities and schools throughout the year in some cases long distances it shows these communities and schools that we are committed to assisting them in their dreams for their futures and for the future of their communities. We need to encourage these communities that University is not out of their reach but with assistance and information being given to them they can succeed in their chosen fields. By providing the correct information about pathways, studying by distance and University degree’s then they can make the right decisions for themselves. By visiting these communities it’s about showing that we are here to assist and support the students and communities to make the right choices for them and that the opportunities are available.

Indigenous-specific and other scholarships offered by UNE

UNE offers government and industry scholarships, and scholarships are available through diverse organisations in Law, Health, Nursing, Medicine and Pharmacy, Education, Political Science. UNE’s scholarships include Residential Scholarships and Indigenous Mentoring Scholarships.

Table 12: New 2015 Indigenous Commonwealth Equity Scholarships*

Scholarship details

Government/

Private/
University

No. allocated

Total

cost

No. awarded

Comments

IAS

Government

20

$96,460

27

7 additional IAS allocated (initial allocation was 20)

ICAS

Government

7

$35,609

7

 

IECAS

Government

5

$25,435

5

 

ICECS

Government

17

$43,231

19

2 additional ICECS allocated (initial allocation was 17)

IECECS

Government

15

$38,145

16

1 additional IECECS allocated

Total

64

$238,880

74

Table 13: Continuing 2015 Indigenous Commonwealth Equity Scholarships*

Scholarship details

Government/

Private/
University

No. allocated

Total
cost

No. awarded

Comments

ICAS

Government

15

$76,305

2

13 ICAS not continued in 2015 scholarship periods

ICECS

Government

25

$63,575

4

21 ICECS not continued in 2015 scholarship periods

Total

Government

40

$139,880

6

*Data sourced from ‘Attachment B – Reconciliation Form’, completed by UNE Scholarships Office for 2015 Reconciliation Process (Indigenous Commonwealth Scholarships Programme).

Table 14: 2015 UNE Scholarships - Undergraduate**

Scholarship details

Government/
Private/
University

No. Allocated

Cost

No. Awarded to Indigenous Students

Comments

Indigenous-specific scholarships

Ella Schroder Indigenous Residential Scholarship

University

(donor scholarship)

1

Annual Accommodation cost to a maximum of $10,000

0

Open to school leavers with financial and geographical disadvantage, who have completed high school at boarding school. For applicants who will study on campus and live in a UNE residential college.

No applicants in 2015.

Max Schroder Scholarship

University

(donor scholarship)

4

$6,000 per annum for the duration of Course with a 4 year maximum (for UNE residential college fees)

4

Open to school leavers and current students with financial and geographical disadvantage, for on campus study. (2 of 4 places were allocated for Teaching and Nursing degrees; in 2015 the donor approved award to students in any discipline).

Max Schroder Male Indigenous Mentoring Scholarship

University

(donor scholarship)

1

Full residential scholarship (excluding meals) or up to $8,000pa

1

Open to final year undergraduate students and postgraduate students. Awarded to postgraduate student in 2015.

Max Schroder Female Indigenous Mentoring Scholarship

University

(donor scholarship)

1

Full residential scholarship (excluding meals) or up to $8,000pa

1

New scholarship in 2015, open to final year undergraduate students and postgraduate students. Awarded to undergraduate student in 2015.

Max Schroder SportUNE Scholarship

University

(donor scholarship)

2

$3,000 for 1 year

0

Open to Indigenous school leaver and gap year applicants who demonstrate sporting achievements at high level and financial disadvantage.

No applicants in 2015.

Hunter New England Population Health Aboriginal Nursing Scholarship

University

(donor scholarship)

3

(1 each for 1st Year, 2nd Year and 3rd Year Students)

$5,000 for First Year Student $6,000 for Second Year Student

$7,500 for Third Year Student

1

1 awarded to 1st year applicant. No applicants for 2nd or 3rd Year Student places.

Total Indigenous-specific

12

 

7

 

Other Scholarships

UNE Health Integrated Degrees Scholarship

University

1

$7,500 for 1 year of study

1

New scholarship in 2015, for applicants enrolled in B. Health Practice/B. Community Services or B. Health Practice.

Country Women’s Association of NSW/Earle Page College Equity Scholarship

University

(donor scholarship)

4

$2,000 per annum for 1 year

1

Open to applicants from Equity groups; high number of applications (3 out of 14 applicants were Indigenous).

Only 1 awarded due to eligibility.

Support Fund for Students with a Disability

University

10

Variable amount pending application

(for items to directly assist capacity to study)

2

Open to applicants from Equity groups (students with disability); high number of applications (2 out of 31 applicants were Indigenous).

Science and Industry Endowment Fund Scholarship

University

1

$8,000 per annum for 3 years

0

Equity scholarship open to applicants who are:

Either an Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander student; or have geographic disadvantage; and

From a low-SES background

For a student enrolled at Bachelor level in Sciences (Science, Computer Science, Biomedical Science, Engineering Technology) who will reside in UNE college for 1st year.

None of the 12 applicants were Indigenous in 2015.

The Lord’s Taverners Northern NSW Scholarship

University

(donor scholarship)

1

$7,000 for Duration of degree

0

Equity scholarship open to applicants with financial/geographical disadvantage, and applicants who are Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander, or from marginalized group. None of the applicants were Indigenous in 2015.

Austin College Entrance Scholarship

University

4

$1,000 for 1 year (for College fees)

1

Open to all commencing on campus students who intend to reside in Austin College, selection based on academic merit in HSC or equivalent and achievements in academia, sports, community service or performing arts.

Total other scholarships

21

5

Total of All

33

12

**Data sourced from UNE Scholarships Office, Student Administration & Services. (‘Cost’ is value of each scholarship place offered.) The above table of UNE Undergraduate Scholarships indicates under ‘Other’ the UNE scholarships for which Indigenous students are part of an overall cohort such as students from equity groups or meeting specific enrolment criteria.

Table 15: 2015 UNE Scholarships - Postgraduate***

Scholarship
details

Government/ Private/University

No. Allocated

Cost

No. Awarded to Indigenous Students

Comments

Indigenous-specific scholarships

     

Apted Honours and Postgraduate Scholarship for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students

University

6

$5,000

6

All awarded for part or full funding requested

UNE HDR ATSI Participation Scholarship (Creative Practice)

University

4

$25,849 p.a. for duration of HDR degree

4

All applicants received full funding requested to support study costs (2 awarded to Masters students, 2 awarded to PhD students)

***Data sourced from UNE’s Research Services. (‘Cost’ is value of each scholarship place offered.)

Promotion of scholarships to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

UNE promotion of scholarship opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in 2015 included:

  • UNE Undergraduate and Commonwealth Equity Scholarships are advertised on UNE’s Scholarships homepage at:
    http://www.une.edu.au/scholarships
  • UNE also promotes scholarships offered through external providers such as Aboriginal Education Council (NSW) and NSW Aboriginal Land Council, the public sector and others at the homepage: http://www.une.edu.au/scholarships/indigenous
  • In 2015 UNE also increased targeted online promotions through its ‘blog’ pages, direct promotion via bulk emails to all enrolled Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and to enrolment cohorts from this group who met specific eligibility. These strategies, together with information for dissemination through Oorala Aboriginal Centre, aimed to increase demand for scholarships where low take-up rates were identified. UNE Schools also promoted scholarships to students in specific disciplines.
  • All scholarships administered by Research Services are advertised on their website: http://www.une.edu.au/research/research-services/higher-degree-research/hdr-scholarships

Oorala Aboriginal Centre promotes all available scholarships to our students via our website, our Moodle Support site and in our printed Oorala Prospectus for future student information. In addition to this Oorala Outreach and Promotions staff provided printed summaries of popular scholarships at all Career Expo and outreach activities. This document contains a link to all available scholarship information.

Scholarship take-up rates

2015 take-up rates were as follows for scholarships offered for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students:

  • 114 Commonwealth Equity Scholarships were awarded to ATSI students by UNE in 2015
  • All Apted Honours and Postgraduate Scholarships for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students were awarded for 2015, with one of these pending the student’s acceptance for payment on their progression into the required level of study.
  • 100% take-up rate for UNE HDR ATSI Participation Scholarship applicants (Creative Practice Scholars Program through School of Arts). For PhD recipients these were awarded for up to 3 years and for Masters degree recipients were awarded for up to five years to encourage their progression to Doctorate study.
AEP Goal 4: ATSI student participation rate

4. Achieve the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in higher education, at rates commensurate with those of all other Australians.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

  • The total number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student enrolments for 2015, compared to 2014 (please provide an all student comparison).
  • Details of your Universities’ strategies to address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student   participation.
  • Indigenous Education/Support Unit’s role.

Total number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student enrolments for 2014 and 2015 (all student comparison)

From the total number of ATSI enrolments at UNE, on campus enrolments increased from 132 in 2014 to 146 in 2015. This was a greater rate of increase than in the previous reporting period, and there has been an increase of 64.04% for this cohort since 2010. Off campus enrolments also increased at a higher rate than previously, with a total of 458 in 2014 and 550 in 2015 and an increase of 94% since 2010. In 2015, the largest numbers of total ATSI student enrolments were in courses offered through the Schools of Education (21.69%), Health (11.78%), Humanities (9.48%) and Science & Technology (8.04%).

From the overall domestic student cohort in 2015 the proportion of all ATSI enrolments was 3.11%. The parity target set in the Compact for ATSI students in higher education equates to 2.3%, with progressive targets set for each year including only the numbers of undergraduate, postgraduate and HDR students by headcount. For 2015 the parity target was exceeded for the number of ATSI undergraduate students (472, 3.2%). However, not for postgraduate, HDR students or the total student number against the progressive target.

Table 16: Total ATSI and non-ATSI student numbers, 2014-2015
Students

2014

2015

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students:

590

696

Non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (Domestic students only):

21,396

21,633

UNE Strategies to address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student participation

As detailed in 1.3, participation by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in higher education is one of UNE’s strategic priorities stated in the Compact and other key documents. UNE’s Research Plan 2012–2015 emphasises pathways and academic support programs as strategies to address participation in higher degree programs. The Regional Aboriginal Higher Education Strategy (RAHES) also prioritises Community Engagement principles as key to meeting strategic goals in participation and other educational outcomes. Specifically, the RAHES expresses a commitment to building and maintaining relationships with regional Aboriginal communities and providing a culturally safe environment for Aboriginal students and staff.

The services, facilities and engagement activities through Oorala Aboriginal Centre are pivotal in UNE’s participation strategies, as well as the academic programs through UNE Schools which consistently attract strong continuing enrolments from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. Since 2010 there has been a 56.42% increase in continuing enrolments in UNE’s undergraduate and postgraduate awards.

Table 17: UNE Strategies to address participation

Strategies

Outline of strategies

Constraints

Outcome

Build the number of indigenous HDR students

Three new Apted Honours and Postgraduate Scholarships offered for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Students (2014). Research Fellowships through Vice-Chancellor’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Fellowship Scheme (from 2013). New HDR Participation Scholarships for ATSI Masters and PhD students (2015).

 

All new Apted scholarships awarded in 2015. Continuation of inaugural Fellowship;

School of Law Fellow was recruited in 2015. Four new UNE HDR Participation Scholarships for ATSI Masters and PhD students to be offered in 2015.

(See details under ‘Programs to improve access’.)

UNE Business School continued to offer courses with Indigenous content

UNE Business School continued to offer courses with Indigenous content.

Dependent upon allocation of targeted promotion to prospective students

ATSI enrolments in Business steadily increase (25 in 2013, 28 in 2014, 42 in 2015) for courses from Diploma through to undergraduate and postgraduate level, with a promising increase in postgraduate Business degree enrolments (8 in 2013, 12 in 2014, 14 in 2015). Increases from 2014 to 2015 were mainly in the Bachelor of Business and Bachelor of Organisational Leadership.

UNE MATSITI Exploratory Research Project

Funded by the ‘More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teachers Initiative’ (MATSITI), commenced in 2014 by School of Education with Oorala Aboriginal Centre, includes strategy development to improve participation by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teacher education students at UNE.

MATSITI Funding guidelines and voluntary student participation

The research phase concluded in 2015, with the final report due for publication in the second quarter of 2016

Law Students Indigenous Community Moodle site

This site was been created to build an online community for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander law students at UNE, and provides information on news and events, academic supports, career and professional development opportunities, profiles of successful Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander alumni, and news items relevant to Indigenous students.

The site is currently managed by School of Law academic staff, within existing workloads and budgets.

Student engagement with the site is being monitored.

School of Humanities Indigenous Heritage project

The ongoing ARC grant led by Associate Professor Beck titled ‘Indigenous Heritage: Working ancient wetlands for social benefit and cultural understanding’ has as one of its aims encouraging local Aboriginal youth to enrol at UNE, through fieldwork participation.

Funding is for 3 years.

 

School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences Respecting Indigeneity Strategic Plan

The School created the Respecting lndigeneity Strategic Plan to guide the School’s overall operations and partly to increase applications for the School's Muriel Snow Scholarship for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, details available at:

No additional funding required

Underpins the School’s strategic planning and service provision

Support to attend CATSINaM conference

The School of Health supported six Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to attend CATSINaM (Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives) in Darwin in 2015 and participate in student leadership activity. Outline of strategies

students have other commitments (e.g. family, work)

Timing of the congress can impact on student clinical placement so attendance was considered part of placement activity.

Students reported feeling proud to be Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nursing students and appreciated the role modelling of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives. Several indicated they previously had no idea of the numbers and calibre of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives as clinicians, educators, researchers and leaders. Those graduating were able to form direct links with the professional leaders in nursing. Other students stated they would provide informal mentoring for other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in the School on their return to campus in 2016.

Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s role – Participation

In 2015, Oorala’s strategies to improve participation included:

  • Orientation activities including the Centre’s Pre-Orientation Program (‘POP’) for on and off campus TRACKS students and involvement in major UNE orientation events for commencing UNE students (‘Townies’ Welcome BBQ, Lifesaver Day, etc.), to foster early engagement and participation by local and regional students.
  • Oorala’s successful extension of its HEPPP funded Student Retention Project continued to increase the Centre’s student engagement with its support services and ITAS tutoring.
  • Involvement in ‘Youth Expo’ and ‘Well Fair Day’ at UNE, ‘A Day in the Dale’ organised by Armidale Dumaresq Council and other events with the UNE and local communities featuring Aboriginal services, organisations and local cultural activities.
  • Oorala was successful in a number of proposals for HEPP funded projects to increase Aboriginal people’s participation from target regions in higher education through community engagement. [List Oorala HEPP projects.]
  • Items noted under Oorala’s role in Access, Outreach and Support are also relevant to participation.
  • The Student Grievance Unit (SGU) has worked closely with Oorala to improve the complaints-handling process for Aboriginal and Torres Strait students and to ensure cultural sensitivity.
AEP Goal 5: ATSI student graduation rate

5. Enable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to attain the same graduation rates from award courses in higher education as for other Australians.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

  • The total number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student completions at Bachelor level and above in 2015, compared to 2014 (please provide an all student comparison).
  • Support mechanisms you have in place to assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to complete their study.
  • Indigenous Education/Support Unit’s role.

Total number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student completions at Bachelor level and above in 2015, compared to 2014 (all student comparison)

The totals for ATSI completions at Bachelor level and above (62 in 2014, 41 in 2015) reflect a decrease in completions in postgraduate degrees and overall total for award courses at Bachelor level and above. However, UNE’s strategies to increase access and support for students in Bachelor degrees and postgraduate courses including higher degrees, are expected to improve this trend over the long term. We expect completions to increase in the coming years because the commencing numbers have increased from 286 to 364 from 2014 to 2015. Also because the number of students enrolled in TRACKS has increased dramatically, and the number of students making use of the ITAS program, also point to likely higher completion rates in future years.

In addition to the completion data in the following table, there were completions by ATSI students in courses below Bachelor level (2 in 2014, 7 in 2015).

Comparison data for non-ATSI students includes completions by domestic students only. It is significant that the data for completions by non-ATSI students also indicates a decrease in postgraduate and overall total for award courses. These completions by both ATSI and non-ATSI students may reflect that recent trends in the higher education sector and changes in course offerings by UNE have had an impact on completions by domestic students at UNE, especially in the category of ‘other postgraduate’ courses (including Graduate Certificate and Graduate Diploma courses).

[Note the 2014 completions exceeded the target of 47 set for all ATSI completions in the Compact. However, we did not meet the target of 49 set for 2015.]

Table 18: Numbers of ATSI degree and postgraduate students, 2014–15

Table 18: Numbers of ATSI degree and postgraduate students, 2014-15
Students

2014

2015

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Higher Degree)

10

4

Non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Higher Degree)

728

724

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Other postgraduate)

13

2

Non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Other postgraduate)

826

665

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Bachelor degree)

39

35

Non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Bachelor degree)

1,643

1,706

UNE Support mechanisms for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

Table 19: UNE support mechanisms for ATSI students

Table 19: UNE support mechanisms for ATSI students

Support mechanisms

Description

Constraints

Outcome

Oorala Student Retention Project

HEPP funded project to improve retention rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander undergraduate students, including a number of strategies to support academic progress This has led to the development of a retention model specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students working in collaboration/consultation with SA&S.

Funding was secured for a further year to cover 2015.

  • A short video to promote the Retention Project Plan.
  • Recruitment of Aboriginal Engagement Officer (AEO), UNE’s Tamworth   Study Centre
  • A survey was developed to explore how students feel about their   engagement with UNE.
  • A model   comprising of two main parts:
    Intensive case management for facilitating support for students at risk of   early attrition to improve academic success; and
    Building resilience and self-efficacy as learners and retain Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students   – the Oorala Student Support team to implement interventions or approaches   that are student specific and UNE wide.

Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme (ITAS)

Provides additional academic tutorial assistance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students; coordinated by Oorala with Commonwealth funding

Scope limited by ITAS funding guidelines and availability of ongoing funding;

Availability of suitable tutors in local areas for off campus students in non-local regions

Intensive promotion and other strategies resulted in increased no. of students tutored (from 58 in 2014 to 62 in 2015) and increase in number of hours for which students were tutored (2330.04 in 2014; 2899.35 in 2015).

The number of ATSI tutors increased from 44 (5 Indigenous) in 2014 to 49 (10 Indigenous) in 2015.

Targeted Library Orientation Sessions

Orientation sessions conducted by Library staff to inform indigenous students about library services and resources. Consultation with Oorala staff to provide sessions designed for indigenous students.

Funding and staff resource limitations

Increased student engagement with the Library; service to be reviewed regularly with Indigenous staff and students.

UNE MATSITI Exploratory Research Project

Funded by the ‘More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teachers Initiative’ (MATSITI), commenced in 2014 by School of Education with Oorala Aboriginal Centre as a project partner, to expand support strategies which aim to improve retention and graduation rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teacher education students at UNE.

MATSITI Funding guidelines and voluntary student participation

The research phase concluded in 2015, with the final report due for publication in the second quarter of 2016

Student Progress and Success Model Tool

In development by UNE’s Strategy & Planning office, to allow for closer monitoring of trends in rates of retention, progression and completion of particular student cohorts.

Staff resources to complete development work on the Model Tool.

It is anticipated that UNE will be able to interrogate data on ATSI students at the cohort level (i.e. Aboriginal students entering UNE with a specific basis of admission, SES status etc.) to facilitate review and improvement of support mechanisms across the University.

National Indigenous Legal Conference 2015

The School of Law facilitated sponsorship from the NSW Bar Association for two Aboriginal law students (Scott Lindsay and Bryce Wilson) to attend the National Indigenous Legal Conference 2015,
3–4 September in Melbourne (hosted by Tawirri Indigenous Law Students and Lawyers Association of Victoria).

The school will be seeking increased sources of sponsorship in 2016.

The students reported that ‘The conference was a chance to engage with some truly inspirational legal advocates and politicians, while also offering an opportunity to network with other Indigenous law students from across the country. The conference was informative and eye-opening about the continued pursuit, and struggle, for legal equality.’

UNE also links Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students with opportunities such as those offered through the National Indigenous Cadetship Project, which provides paid work placements with government and industry employers for full-time students completing their degree qualifications.

UNE’s agencies for support include the Student Administration & Services’ Student Support Team, Oorala Aboriginal Centre, Special Needs Office and the ‘Help with Homesickness’ homepage providing contacts for assistance.

Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s role – Support mechanisms

Oorala’s initiatives in student support and involvement with UNE to improve graduation rates included:

  • Oorala provides support for TRACKS and TAFE Pathways students, as well as for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in UNE courses. Key elements include Oorala’s orientation and project activities, ITAS tutoring, mentoring, community networks, online support hubs through Moodle and development of a multi-faceted approach collaborating with UNE’s services on engagement and retention.
  • Collaboration with UNE Schools and First Year Advisors to increase the uptake rate of ITAS tutoring and the pool of suitably qualified ITAS tutors, especially where students needed more targeted support such as Health and Law disciplines, or off campus students in remote areas. Promotion of ITAS tutoring through on campus sessions and retention visits resulted in improved uptake rates and outcomes. In 2015, 78% of units receiving ITAS tutoring obtained pass grades or higher.
  • Ongoing advice and support on scholarship and Abstudy matters, intensive schools and clinical placements.
  • Mentoring and socio-cultural support through the Elder-in-Residence/Student Relationship Officer assists student adjustment to university life. This staff member also joined UNE’s Special Needs Contact Network to provide specific support to special needs students and advise on UNE’s Disability Action Plan.
  • ‘Yarn-up’ event for commencing, continuing and future Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students with participation from 12 organisations and UNE service providers, to foster ongoing support networks for student peer groups with services in accommodation, health, careers, financial assistance and academic support.
  • Information sessions by ‘Career Trackers’ and motivational presentation by an Indigenous Educational Ambassador.
  • Event hosted at Oorala linking local community health providers with Aboriginal students in UNE Health awards, to improve arrangements for clinical and work placements.
  • Maintenance of Oorala’s focus on providing a culturally safe place for students, including study and learning facilities, equipment (computers, internet, printing, scanning, copying, etc.) and social spaces.
  • 15 retention and engagement visits to target areas which had shown high attrition rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (North Western NSW and North Coast of NSW). Visits included workshops and face-to-face group or individual support.
  • Continued liaison and collaboration with UNE Schools and Student Administration Services to identify strategies for improved outcomes, and visits to Aboriginal Support Units at other universities to review ‘best practice’ in support. Work with UNE included a focus on admission and enrolment processes, course requirements, advice and advocacy on academic progress issues, liaison with unit coordinators and referrals to specialised support services (first year advisors, Academic Skills Office, counsellors, etc.)
  • Oorala academics were project partners with School of Education in the UNE MATSITI Exploratory Research Project. The Centre’s student support staff provided consultation to the project’s research group to expand support strategies for ATSI teacher education students at UNE with the aim of increasing retention and completion. Surveys and discussion groups were developed and implemented in 2014, with data collection completed in 2015. The report is due for publication in the second quarter of 2016 Oorala’s involvement broadened the School’s awareness of culturally relevant and authentic ways in which to support Indigenous students.
  • An academic from the Oorala Centre was a member of the steering committee for a HEPP-funded project which employed an Indigenous academic and an administrative assistant in the School of Rural Medicine.
  • Oorala also provided input to School of Education on other support methods for education students, e.g. specific orientation initiatives, cultural awareness training for School staff and pathways for AEO’s into education degrees.
AEP Goal 6: Understanding and respect for traditional and contemporary culture

6. To provide all Australian students with an understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander traditional and contemporary cultures.

Your response to this goal needs to address but is not limited to the following points:

  • Details of how and to what extent Indigenous perspectives are reflected in curriculum at your University.
  • How the University addresses the cultural competency of its staff and students.
  • The University’s involvement with Indigenous community members in working toward this goal.
  • Indigenous Education/Support Unit’s role.

Indigenous perspectives in curriculum at UNE

UNE graduate attributes are embedded in course learning outcomes.

  • Ethical Conduct and Social Responsibility is one of the University’s graduate attributes: Graduates will behave ethically and with social responsibility within their discipline and educational context.
  • This is further expanded in the Teaching and Learning Plan 2012–2015: Ensure our graduate attributes promote social and cultural understanding including an appreciation of Indigenous culture and history.

The UNE Graduate Attributes are the generic characteristics and personal qualities that define UNE graduates, together with the core knowledge, skills and capabilities specific to a student’s course of study and are therefore embedded in course learning outcomes. Course mapping is a means by which UNE ensures that graduate attributes are given an appropriate focus which may be discipline-nuanced, are aligned with course content and are achieved. The attribute of ethical conduct and social responsibility instils in UNE graduates the ability to recognise, reflect on and respond appropriately to social, cultural and ethical issues.

In 2014 UNE identified that a whole-of-university approach requires Indigenous cultural content to be included in units and a more inclusive approach to pedagogy. This makes the content more accessible to Indigenous students, as well as increasing the cultural capital and competency of the University as a whole and of students in their learning and qualifications. During 2015, the Oorala Director engaged pro-actively with UNE’s Schools including Arts, Education, Law, Health, Humanities and UNE Business School, to improve linkage and discussion on Indigenous knowledges in curriculum.

The School of Health continues to work in collaboration with Indigenous stakeholder groups such as the peak body CATSINaM (Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives) to ensure that the nursing curriculum at UNE reflects a strong Indigenous health component. The School also adheres to the Australian Nursing and Midwives Association Committee’s accreditation requirement that nursing curriculum include an Indigenous health focus. Several clinical practice settings for students have been available including placement in an Indigenous community health setting, for example Coledale Community, Tamworth. An Indigenous focus is further incorporated into other core units in the pre-registration Nursing program.

Oorala linked with the School of Education’s Indigenous Research Network, which included discussion on Indigenous knowledges in curriculum. This research network aims to increase focus on Indigenous education research, and to support Indigenous people to undertake and be supported in higher degree research programs. A number of academic staff specifically seek ATSI students for HDR. A number of Indigenous HDR students are enrolled and receive additional support through the Indigenous Education Research Network. This network will become the Equity and Diversity Network in 2016, and include a wider membership of staff.

Oorala offers the units OORA100/300: Aboriginal Resilience and the Arts and OORA200/400: Working with Aboriginal People which are included in the TRACKS Program, undergraduate and postgraduate UNE courses as core or listed units as outlined below.

Table 20: 2015 units run by Oorala offered in UNE courses as core, listed or elective units

OORA200/400

Core

Listed

Bachelor of Nursing

Bachelor of Social Science

Master of Nursing Practice

Bachelor of Education (Primary)

Bachelor of Social Work

Bachelor of Criminology

 

Bachelor of Criminology/Law

OORA100/300

Core

Listed

Bachelor of Music

Bachelor of Theatre and Performance

 

Bachelor of Media and Communication

Table 21: Enrolments in Oorala units in 2015

Unit code

Unit name

Enrolments

OORA100

Aboriginal Resilience and the Arts

33

OORA200

Working with Aboriginal People

172

OORA300

Aboriginal Resilience and the Arts

8

OORA400

Working with Aboriginal People

12

Total

225

The units are offered on campus and online in Trimesters 1 and 2 and attract Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, other domestic students and a significant cohort of international students.

During 2015 there were an additional 21 units of study offered providing specific Indigenous content across UNE courses. These include:

The School of Humanities offers content from ten units to contribute to Oorala’s TRACKS Tertiary Preparation Program. In addition the school offers nine units in history and indigenous studies which solely focus on ATSI content. In 2015, following a whole of School review in 2014, Humanities undertook a review of the Indigenous Studies Major, involving across UNE, including Oorala. The new major will commence in 2017.

  • The EDCX unit Aboriginal Education which is mandatory across all of the School of Education’s Teaching awards at Bachelor and Masters level. The unit is presented in conjunction with Indigenous Education Consultants from the Tamworth office of the NSW Department of Education & Training and at 300 and 500 level requires students to complete 20 days Professional Experience.
  • EDCX 515 Indigenous Australian Education: Issues and Policies, which is a key unit in the Master of Education (coursework) and EDSS328/428 Secondary Education: Aboriginal Studies, offered in Teaching degrees for secondary teachers.
  • The JMP BMed is accredited by the Australian Medical Council (AMC) as meeting AMC Standards for a primary medical program provided by an Australian University. In accrediting the JMP BMed program, the AMC has acknowledged that the graduates of the JMP meet the expected graduate attributes. The ability to work effectively, competently and safety in a diverse cultural environments include Indigenous cultures is one of the graduate attributes expected of a student completing the JMP. Graduates of the JMP are expected to have knowledge, understanding and skills in Indigenous Health. Students are required to complete the Indigenous Health component of the JMP BMed, and undertake the required assessments to demonstrate their knowledge of Indigenous Health and competencies in understanding the Indigenous culture.
  • The School of Law is leading a national Office for Learning and Teaching grant entitled “Indigenous Cultural Competency for Legal Academics Program.” This project will develop a framework, professional development module and teaching resources to support the inclusion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledges and cultural competency in legal education.

There were also units offered with some Indigenous content:

  • Indigenous content is embedded in a number of courses and units through UNE Business School, e.g. GSB722 ‘Managing Diversity’ which includes the main study topic ‘Employing Indigenous Australians’; also MM200 ‘Contemporary Management’ has a broad focus on cultural diversity and social inclusion is addressed. The UNE Business School’s Master of Economic and Regional Development includes a major in Indigenous Futures which seeks to prepare students for a career involved in community and regional development projects.
  • Within the UNE Bachelor of Laws program there are 6 core units and 6 elective units that include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander content (LAW101, LAW157, LAW164, LAW 272, LAW281, LAW301, LAW312, LAW313, LAW314, LAW341, LAW358, LAW389, LAW400). For example the core unit LAW101, Law in Context, includes Race and the Law with a focus on the colonisation and the historical treatment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. There are two Indigenous specific elective units – LAW164 Indigenous Australians and the Law; and LLM532 Indigenous Natural Resource Issues. LAW164 Indigenous Australians and Law – was revised in 2015 to include a learning outcome on Indigenous protocols and cultural competency from 2017. In 2015 the LLM unit Innovation Law (LLM537) also introduced a seminar on “Indigenous Innovations and Aspirations: International and Domestic Support”. Indigenous content is also included in LLM553 Australian Common Law System.
  • The School of Behavioural and Social Sciences has 21 units with   some ATSI content including Indigenous languages, linguistics, Language and   the Law, psychology and sociology.
  • All Bachelor of Nursing/Master of Nursing   units in School of Health contain at least one theme of Indigenous Health   focused learning, including understanding and respect for traditional and   contemporary Indigenous culture. The elective unit HSNS527 Rural and Remote Contexts of Practice has a major component of Indigenous content.
  • The Arts School unit Australian Film includes Indigenous cultural contents in the modules on the Language of (Australian) Cinema; and the unit Minorities and Majorities in Australian Theatre explores issues of power and identity (including gender, race, class and sexuality) within the context of recent Australian theatre, covered Aboriginal theatre.
  • Through the School of Environmental & Rural Science, Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander perspectives are presented in CANI310/510 ‘Wild Dog Ecology’ in relation to the role of dogs in Indigenous societies, and the influence of customs and culture on wild dog management and dingo conservation. The unit includes teaching materials produced by Aboriginal people and an opportunity for students to gain Aboriginal community experience through participating in a dog health program in the Tiwi Islands.
  • In the School of Science and Technology, two Pharmacy units (PHAR320/360) included cultural awareness training done in 2015 as a 4 hours workshop, with a plan to expand to a full-day workshop in 2016. PHAR450 is a Pharmacy practicum unit and students after completion of their third year undertake a four-week placement in either a community or hospital pharmacy. Students who elect rural and remote placements undergo mandatory cultural awareness training at Oorala. The unit (PHAR460) Rural and remote Pharmacy covers multidisciplinary care, primary care and health promotion, challenges in the provision of accessible, clinically and culturally appropriate health care in rural and remote settings including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

How UNE addresses the cultural competency of its staff and students

Cultural awareness training has been made available to all staff by UNE’s Human Resource Services directorate to improve staff competencies in engagement with students and staff from diverse cultural backgrounds.

A one-day pilot cultural awareness program was offered and delivered to staff across the School of Environmental Rural Sciences. After this initial program it was decided that a more in-depth cultural immersion program would be more appropriate and would affect greater attitudinal change across the University. The immersion program will be run over two days, with one day on campus and the next visiting sites of cultural significance in the local area under the guidance of local Aboriginal Elders and National Parks. Human Resource Services are currently in the process of investigating, costing and implementing such an Aboriginal Cultural Immersion Program.

Cultural awareness training has application to the general UNE student body, especially for those students who may engage professionally with Indigenous people through practical placements or as early career graduates going into their field, and students who benefit from developing their overall professional skills. For example, Medical students who attended University Departments of Rural Health in Tamworth or Taree undertook cultural training. The program has been run a number of times during 2015 and has been successful both in terms of demand and positive feedback from participants.

Cultural competency for UNE students is largely through Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander content and perspectives in curriculum and involvement by Elders, Oorala staff and community members in a range of professional networks, events, programs and projects. The increased involvement of Aboriginal representatives on UNE Council and the Human Research Ethics Committee also serves to enhance the level of cultural competency in high level consultation and decision-making on governance, teaching and research matters.

UNE’s website includes the link ‘Information for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community’, accessible on the UNE homepage by public, staff and students. This promotes UNE’s ‘Acknowledgement of Country’ statement, Reconciliation Statement, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy, course and unit information and other relevant information.

During 2015 Members of the Executive of the School of Rural Medicine (SRM) liaised with Oorala Aboriginal Centre to develop a tailored cultural awareness training program for staff of the School. Indigenous health is a core component of the Joint Medical Program (JMP) BMed program delivered by SRM. Students receive training in this component as well in communication skills with culturally-diverse groups, including Indigenous peoples.

UNE’s involvement with Indigenous community members in working toward this goal

Welcome to Country presented by Aboriginal community members or Acknowledgement of Country is a quality standard in UNE official proceedings including meetings of the UNE Council and its committees, graduation ceremonies, orientation days and other major events of Schools and Directorates.

The annual Frank Archibald Memorial Lecture and NAIDOC Week are two key UNE events in the University’s community engagement, coordinated by Oorala. Both events involve a high level of Aboriginal community protocol and participation in official proceedings and associated activities. Established in 1986, the Archibald Lecture is Australia’s longest running university lecture in honour of an Aboriginal person and is dedicated to Mr Frank Archibald, a revered Aboriginal community member of the Armidale area, as well as his descendants and Aboriginal people of the New England region.

Several UNE research projects specifically relate to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander issues and culture, linking with UNE curriculum and extensive community involvement. One example is the ARC research project (commenced in 2012) on 'Indigenous heritage: working ancient wetlands for social benefit and cultural understanding' which focuses on the local New England region, and its archaeology. This research is being carried out in partnership with a number of Local Aboriginal Land Councils and in 2015 involved field trips to sites of significance with participation from UNE’s archaeology discipline, Aboriginal cultural advisors and young Aboriginal people engaging in training and education.

UNE’s Indigenous Education Research Network (IERN) lead by academics in the School of Education (SOE) during 2015 worked in partnership with Oorala, an Aboriginal Advisory Group and researchers from other UNE Schools, to align SOE’s research with Aboriginal-determined priorities. The IERN has worked towards addressing areas such as greater inclusion of Aboriginal perspectives in the Teacher Education curriculum, and how research, pedagogical and institutional practices engage with Indigenous knowledge. The Network also supports development of relevant research projects by SOE staff and HDR students, building research capacity that will contribute to addressing Indigenous disadvantage in education.

Oorala Aboriginal Centre’s Role in Cultural Competency at UNE

  • The School of Education (SOE) at UNE runs a joint program with the NSW Department of Education to provide scholarships for students to teach in high Aboriginal student enrolment schools, and to undertake a program to prepare them for this context. In this program students take two units, one through Oorala, and in the School of Education, to address specific issues in working with Aboriginal children in schools and with their local communities. Placements in 2015 included Moree, Grafton, Dubbo, and Gilgandra. This is a highly successful program that involves excellent partnerships between Oorala, SOE and schools and communities throughout NSW.
  • Since 2015, Oorala has supported the Enhanced Teacher Education Internships, a Department of Education Initiative which places high achieving teacher education students in schools with a high Indigenous student population. As part of their program, 10 students were required to enrol in OORA200 in 2015.
  • OORA units offered through Oorala have enhanced the opportunities for undergraduate and postgraduate students to study Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander content within their degrees.
  • Oorala includes Aboriginal guest presenters in lectures for OORA units and input from the Elder-in-Residence and other Aboriginal staff into cultural perspectives for the Centre’s TRACKS Program. Program activities included excursions to local sites of cultural significance with community presenters.
  • Oorala Aboriginal Student Support staff provide input to UNE First Year Advisors on cultural awareness training.
  • Oorala’s Elder-in-Residence presents Welcome to Country at official UNE events and in Oorala’s student activities, also participating on several local community committees and boards and providing consultation to UNE projects such as the ‘Ancient Wetlands’ project.
  • Oorala and Aboriginal staff continued to support the East Armidale Community Garden, a postdoctoral research project Nourishing Culture and Developing Social Capital in a Community Garden. The project leader collaborates with members of Armidale's Aboriginal community and local organisations as partners, to develop a garden in East Armidale on the border of Narwan Village, a former Aboriginal reserve, with a focus on positive engagement with place through caring for Country. The East Armidale Indigenous Community Garden is a collaborative project with involvement of the Aboriginal Oorala Centre, TAFE New England, Jobs Australia, Best Employment, the Clontarf Academy (Armidale High School), The Armidale School and UNE.
  • The 2015 Frank Archibald Memorial Lecture was presented by Professor Rhonda Marriott, (PhD Murd., RN, Midwife), Professor, Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing, Murdoch University, WA. Prof Marriott presented her lecture on ‘Valuing Ngaarda Ways in Research’, speaking about cultural safety and ethical research practice in partnerships with Aboriginal people of the Pilbara, region of WA. Through Oorala’s engagement associated with her visit, Prof Marriott met with local Aboriginal health professionals and UNE academics to discuss issues in Aboriginal health research.
  • Oorala’s 2015 community engagement was increased involvement by local Aboriginal Elders’ groups in the Centre’s events, programs and student support activities.
  • Oorala’s Director and senior staff attended   the following to maintain development of cultural competency within the   Centre’s role at UNE:
    • September–October – National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network (NIRAKN) and National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Consortium Aboriginal Corporation (NATSIHEC-AC) (Adelaide), Dr Rhonda Wilson.
    • October – The Australia New Zealand Society for Ecological Economics (ANZSEE) 2015 Conference “Thriving Through Transformation – Local to Global Sustainability” University of New England Business School, Armidale. Indigenous Participant Sponsorship, Dr Rhonda Wilson.
    • November – National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Consortium, Aboriginal Corporation (NATSIHEC-AC) (Melbourne), Mr Gregory Davison.

Expenditure of Indigenous Support Program Grant

Please use the financial acquittal template attached to report on the expenditure of your University’s ISP grant for 2015, noting that a breakdown of expenditure is required. Where ISP expenditure does not match the audited annual financial statements for the year ending 31 December 2015 provided under section 19–10 of Higher Education Support Act 2003, please provide reconciliation.

This ISP report is a legislated requirement, under the Higher Education Support Act 2003 –
Other Grants Guidelines (Education) 2008.

NB: The accessible content of the forms appears below, and the signed forms are found in TRIM.

Financial Acquittal

Organisation: University of New England

Postal Address: Armidale NSW

Contact Person: Lyndel Taylor Title: Snr Management Accountant

Financial Acquittal

This financial acquittal proforma is designed to acquit all ISP Funds provided in 2015, including all interest or royalties/income derived from ISP Funds during 2015.

Document Attachments
Attachment Name of Attachment Checklist
1 Indigenous Support Program (ISP) X

For each attachment:

  • Part A seeks information on the GST component of funding provided to you under that element, if applicable.
    • If GST is paid to you, the amount of GST funding which is included in each payment is set out in a Recipient Created Tax Invoice (RCTI) issued to you at the time of the payment. You must state whether these amounts have been remitted to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) or committed for payment to the ATO.
    • If GST is not paid to you, do not complete Part A.
  • Part B seeks information about the funding received and expenditure and commitments, exclusive of any GST. Do not include the GST component of any expenditure in this part.

Certification

Complete this certification after you have completed the Financial Acquittal for any ISP funding which you have received in 2015 and after you have entered all relevant information in the Assets Register.

ISP Funding Recipient's Certification

I, Professor Annabelle Duncan, Vice-Chancellor & CEO, certify that:

  1. the details shown in this financial acquittal form and the accompanying pages — including the details of assets acquired and disposed of — represent a complete, true and correct summary of transactions that took place during the funding year under the Indigenous Education Program (ISP);
  2. Funds were spent on activities and initiatives to achieve the outcomes/targets indicated in the Higher Education Support Act 2003;
  3. any interest earned or royalties/income derived from these Funds was expended on activities to advance the objects of the Higher Education Support Act 2003; and

I understand that:

  • in the event that I have not remitted GST paid under the Agreement to the Australian Taxation Office, that it is my obligation to remit those amounts, as required under the A New Tax System (Goods and Services Tax) Act 1999; and
  • it is an offence under the Criminal Code Act 1995 to provide false or misleading information.

Signed: Annabelle Duncan (signed document is available in TRIM)
Date: 12 May 2016

Privacy Notice

The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C) collects your personal information (including your name, organisation and contact details) for the purposes of administering Indigenous Education Programmes. PM&C will not otherwise use or disclose your personal information without your consent unless required or authorised by or under law.

Attachment 1 Indigenous Support Program

Provider Name: University of New England

For the 2015 funding year (1 January - 31 December 2015:

Part A - If applicable, Goods and Services Tax (GST) paid under the Agreement:

GST Paid
GSTCost
1. If applicable, GST received by you in 2015 as part of the Indigenous Support Programme funding under the Higher Education Support Act 2003. This amount is stated on your Recipient Created Tax Invoices (RCTIs).$
2. If applicable, GST remitted or committed for payment to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) (in the remittance instalments shown below) 

Amount remitted: $
Date remitted:       /    /    

Amount remitted: $
Date remitted:       /    /

Amount remitted: $
Date remitted:       /    /

Part B - Acquittal Summary Details (excluding GST):

Income
Source of incomeAmount
1. Unexpended Indigenous Support Programme funds from 2014 which were committed for expenditure prior to 31/12/2014$162,943
(+) 2. Unexpended and uncommitted Indigenous Support Programme funds from 2013 which were approved for expenditure in 2015.$
(+) 3. Indigenous Support Programme funds provided in 2015. These amounts appear on Recipient Created Tax Invoices (RCTls) or Payment Advice Letters.$1,239,000
(+) 4. Interest, royalties and other income derived from Indigenous Support Programme funds in 2015.$123
(=) 5. Total Indigenous Support Programme funds to be acquitted in 2015.$1,402,066
Expenditure
ExpenditureCost
6. Total Indigenous Support Programme expenditure in 2015, excluding any GST.$1,160,278
(+) 7. Unexpended Indigenous Support Programme funds which were committed$
(+) 8. Requested carryover into 2015 of unexpended Indigenous Support Programme funds which were not committed for expenditure by 31/12/2015 - written approval date / .. ./2015. (The Department will only approve the rollover of unspent funds in exceptional circumstances.)$
(=) 9. Total Indigenous Support Programme funds which by 31/12/2015 were fully expended and/or committed for expenditure.$1,160,278

10. Returns of 2015 Indigenous Support Program Funds by 31/12/2015 = $0

11. Balance of Funds for 2015 (Unexpended/uncommitted Indigenous Support Programme funds to be returned or recovered from 2014 entitlements). = $241,787

12. Balance of provider's Indigenous Support Programme bank account or cost centre as at 31/12/2015 = $241,787

Section 7 - Breakdown of ISP Expenditure (excluding GST):

Salaries

The Centre's salaries account for 15 full, part-time and casual positions covering an FTE of 8.19 and an average salary plus on-costs of $102,642.

Salaries in the breakdown of ISP Expenditure
SalariesISP
Salaries$651,623
On-Costs$189,012
Total Salaries$840,635 
Operating costs in the breakdown of ISP expenditure
Non-salary operating costs - itemisedISP
Catering Services & Consumables $3,432
Computer Services$103
Fuel Purchases$2,014
Hire Charges$1,913
Membership Subs$945
Minor Consumables$3,214
Motor Vehicles$750
Parking Fees$300
Postages$691
Stationery$2,889
Telephone and Internet Charges$4,053
Staff Deployment$7.866
All Operating Costs$28,170 
Non-salary Program costs - itemised
CostsISP
Advertisinq & Promotional costs$10,817
Promotional Materials$15,444
Building Repairs & Maintenance$1,172
Minor Equipment$34,150
Other Student Activities$13,058
Professional Development$4,502
University Engagement Events$20,821
Student Engagement Activities includes Access, Retention & Recruitment$28,566
Office & Student Foyer Refurbishment as per 2013 elf approval - 2014 commitments spent in 2015$162,943

Total 2015 ISP Program Expenditure = $1,160,278

Optional Information

Breakdown of Non-ISP expenditure to support Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander students
ExpenditureCost
TeachingSalaries$328,693
Non Salaries$19,910
Teaching Total$348,603
Mentoring & Tutorial SupportSalaries$275,484
Non Salaries$5,622
Total Mentoring & Tutorial Support$281,106
HEPP Retention, Outreach & TAFE Pathways ProgramsSalaries$191,328
Non Salaries$41,198
Total HEPP Grants$232,526
= Total2015 Non-ISP expenditure$862,232

If your Institution lists items such as staffing costs, travel costs, services rendered, please provide a detailed description in the below table.

ISP STAFFING COSTS - Breakdown (Includes On-Costs)
PositionFTEIndigenous Centre/Faculty StaffCost
Director0.15Indigenous CentreRedacted
Elder in Residence (HEO7)0.54Indigenous CentreRedacted
Executive Assistant (HEO6)1.0Indigenous CentreRedacted
Policy & Planning Officer (HEO7)0.8Indigenous CentreRedacted
Resource & Compliance Officer (HEO7)1.0Indigenous CentreRedacted
Course Co-ordinator (AcadA/C)0.35Faculty staff assisting CentreRedacted
Lecturer (ATA/B 04)0.35Faculty staff assisting CentreRedacted
Admin Assistant (HE04) Academic Support0.6Faculty staff assisting CentreRedacted
Admin Assistant (HE04) Student Support0.56Indigenous CentreRedacted
Admin Assistant (HE04) Casual0.85Indigenous CentreRedacted
Special Projects Officer (HEO7) Casual0.21Indigenous CentreRedacted
Student Assistants0.11Indigenous CentreRedacted
Student Relationship Officer (HE04)0.46Indigenous CentreRedacted
Student Services Manager (HE07)1.00Indigenous CentreRedacted
Student Services Officer (HE06)1.00Indigenous CentreRedacted
ITAS Support Reimbursement0.8Indigenous CentreRedacted
Total Salary including On-Costs8.19 $840,635
ISP Non-Salary Costs Breakdown
CategoryItemisationCost
Operating Costs (see above table)Office consumables, stationary, postage, telecommunications, employment costs.$28,170
Advertising & Promotional costsStudent publications & Koori Mail Education brief.$10,817
Promotional MaterialsMaterials used for open days, career markets, community promotion events and promotional events.$15,444
Building Repairs & MaintenanceRepairs to Centre's buildings and furnishings.$1,172
Minor EquipmentUpdate staff computers $26k, promo Marquee $2.8k, Student kitchen amenities $2k, Office Equipment $3.4k.$34,150
Other Student ActivitiesStudent supplies for student centre, graduation events & funding two students to ATSI Conference.$13,058
Professional DevelopmentStaff training and conference attendance including FYHE conference.$4,502
University Engagement EventsCost incurred in attending or running university events including NAIDOC week, the annual Archibald Lecture, community days including "Clontarf", "Close the Gap", and "Heart Awareness" initiatives. Attending NATSIHEC meetings.$20,821
Student Engagement Activities Access, Retention & RecruitmentTravel and accommodation cost in attending 20 Career markets and outreach centre visits.$28,566
Office & Student Foyer Refurbishment as per 2013 elf approval - 2014 commitment's spent in 2015Provision of A/C and carpet to centres foyer area to improve the buildings suitability for functions meetings and student access. Improvements to student lab and admin block to improve air flow.$162,943

Higher Education Provider's Contact Information

Please nominate contact officers for all policy and operational matters regarding your Indigenous Education Statement, including name(s), position title, phone number and email address.

Where your Indigenous Education Unit has been consulted in the development of this Indigenous Education Statement, please provide the contact details of the relevant staff member.

Contact details for relevant staff

University Officer

Indigenous Education Support Unit Officer

Name: Professor Annabelle Duncan

Name: Mr Gregory Davison

Position Title: Vice-Chancellor & CEO,

University of New England

Position Title: Director,

Oorala Aboriginal Centre

Phone Number: (02) 6773 2004;

(02) 6773 4071

Phone number: (02) 6773 5824;

(02) 6773 2008

Email: vc@une.edu.au

Email: gdaviso2@une.edu.au;

cc: ooralamgt@une.edu.au

Publication of the Statement

Following approval of the IES by PM&C, Universities are to publish the current and the previous two IES on their website. The documents are required to be externally accessible to the public. Please provide PM&C with a link to these statements.

The previous four IES can be found at:

http://www.une.edu.au/about-une/executive/deputy-vice-chancellor/indigenous-education-statements