Professor David Lindsay

Professor David Lindsay

Professor David Lindsay is an expert in technology law, copyright law and privacy law, and is widely published in these areas. He is the co-author (with Graham Greenleaf) of Public Rights: Copyright’s Public Domains (CUP, Cambridge, 2018), a major new study of comparative and international copyright law from the perspective of uses that do not require permission from the copyright owner. He is General Editor of the Australian Intellectual Property Journal and a board member of the Australian Privacy Foundation (APF). Much of David’s current research focusses on challenges arising from the use of AI, including issues facing the legal profession and human rights challenges. He has recently taken up an appointment as Professor of Law at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), where he a leader of their technology law program and is responsible for the Applied Project in Law, Innovation and Technology.

presents

Taming the Machine? Human Rights Implications of Artificial Intelligence

Considerable resources are being expended in the development and deployment of artificial intelligence (AI). While these transformative technologies give rise to both significant opportunities and risks, analysis of the legal and social implications lags behind the rapid pace of technological change. In particular, although some attention is being given to developing ethical frameworks for AI, analysis of the implications of AI for human rights is at an early stage of development. This presentation will address two of Michael Kirby’s abiding concerns – human rights, and law and technology – by identifying and examining some of the most important human rights implications of AI technologies. Specifically, the presentation will: describe the current state of development of AI technologies, including an explanation of why the technologies are now being implemented; identify the main international initiatives aimed at establishing ethical or human rights frameworks for the development of AI; analysis the implications of AI for particular human rights, especially the rights to privacy and non-discrimination; and draw some conclusions about the merits of potential regulatory interventions, especially those aimed at promoting algorithmic transparency.