The lived experience of methamphetamine use and emotional wellbeing of injecting drug users attending the needle exchange program in Coledale Clinic NSW

Project aim

This study seeks to:

  • Report the demographic and injecting characteristics, and drug use patterns of clients collecting needle syringes from the Coledale Clinic needle exchange program (NSP);
  • Examine the history of NSP clients’ injection drug use;
  • Examine the influence of social and environmental factors on transitions in drug use;
  • Explore risk behaviours such as injecting conditions and sharing practices of people who inject drugs (PWID) in rural NSW;
  • Gain a greater understanding of people’s lived experience of methamphetamine use and their emotional wellbeing.

The information from this study could be employed to improve current efforts in harm reduction in order to better serve the people at risk. A better understanding of PWID’s lived experience of methamphetamine use and their emotional wellbeing will be important in guiding how to modify current harm reduction strategies or design new approaches to more specifically target high-risk populations and high-risk behaviours.

Methodology

When clients come to the Coledale Clinic to use the NSP, they will be asked if they wish to complete an anonymous survey that asks about their drug use, health and mental health. Clients will also be asked if they wish to take part in either a phone or face-to-face interview to gain a greater understanding of people’s lived experience of methamphetamine use and their emotional wellbeing. Potential participants will be offered a small reimbursement for their participation in the survey and interview.

All ethics approvals are in place.

Project Personnel