Dr Jean Holley

Postdoctoral Fellow - School of Environmental and Rural Science

Phone: +61 2 6773 3511

Email: jdrayto3@une.edu.au

Biography

Jean completed her PhD in the field of insect sexual behaviour and sexual selection. She has now focused her research on the ecosystem services that can arise from the reproductive behaviour of insects. Jean is currently working on dung beetles and is investigating the effect of climate change on the important ecosystem service that dung beetles provide, namely dung burial. She is also interested in the role that dung beetles can play in mitigating or accelerating greenhouse gas emissions from cattle manure.

Behavioural and Physiological Ecology

Qualifications

2011 - PhD Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

2004 - Bachelor of Science (Honours) Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

2003 - Bachelor of Science (Zoology) University of New England, Armidale, Australia

Research Interests

Insect Ecology Lab

Publications

Drayton, JM, Boeke, K & Jennions, MD. 2013. Immune challenge and pre- and post-copulatory female choice in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus. Journal of Insect Behaviour 26:176–190.

Drayton, JM, Hall, M, Hunt, J & Jennions, MD. 2012. Sexual signaling and immune function in the black field cricket Teleogryllus commodus. PLoS ONE 7(7): e39631. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0039631.

Drayton, JM & Jennions, MD. 2011. Inbreeding and measures of immune function in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus. Behavioral Ecology. 22: 486-492.

Drayton, JM, Milner, RNC, Hall, MD & Jennions, MD. 2011. Inbreeding and courtship calling in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus. Journal of Evolutionary Biology. 24: 47-58.

Reaney, LT, Drayton, JM & Jennions, MD. 2011. The role of body size and fighting experience in predicting contest behaviour in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 65:217-225.

Drayton, JM, Milner, RNC, Hunt, J & Jennions, MD. 2010. Inbreeding and advertisement calling in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus: laboratory and field experiments. Evolution. 64: 3069-3083.

Jennions, MD, Drayton, JM, Brooks, R & Hunt, J. 2007. Do female black field crickets Teleogryllus commodus benefit from polyandry? Journal of Evolutionary Biology. 20:1469-1477.

Drayton, JM, Hunt, J, Brooks, R & Jennions, MD. 2007. Sounds different: inbreeding depression in sexually selected traits in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus. Journal of Evolutionary Biology. 20:1138–1147.